Textured ceiling

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  #1  
Old 04-02-03, 11:50 AM
Bambi
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Textured ceiling

I had a friend helping me install a ceiling fan in the master bedroom and while in the attic, he had hit his head on one of the rafter beams, fell, and his knee cracked the ceiling in my living room. (Yes, I laid floor in the attic the following weekend.)

I'm in the final stages of repairing the ceiling. I inserted another piece of 2x4 between a couple of the boards in the attic. From the living room, I drove quite a few drywall screws through the 2x4 so I could draw the ceiling back up. I created a bevel along the crack, filled it with compound and that's where I'm at. The ceiling I'm working with has a light texture to it (it's not stomped). I don't know what to use in order to duplicate the pattern and blend in what's been fixed. Can you provide some guidance.

Thanks!

Bambi

Oh, and for inquiring minds, no, the ceiling fan hasn't been completed yet.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-02-03, 02:41 PM
Trying2Help's Avatar
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Sounds like you have orange peel texture applied to the ceiling. You have a couple of choices: 1) Home Depot, Lowes, etc.. sell a spray can of texture with various nozzles to adjust the texture pattern. Buy one of these, follow directions and spray the area, than paint.
2) Buy a small bucket of texture (premixed). Take some of this, put into a container and add some water to it. Dip a stiff bristled brush into it. Hold the brush up to the ceiling, about six inches away and fan the bristles. This will flick the texture of off the brush and onto the ceiling. Adjust the thickness and speckles according to the texture on the ceiling.
 
  #3  
Old 04-02-03, 07:13 PM
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Good advice trying,

Bambi,
Hello & welcome to the forums.

Be prepared, you'll probablly never match you're existing texture exactly. Just get it as close as possible and be happy. If you've got some scrap drywall around, practice a little before you tackle the patch. Good luck & let us know how your ceiling turns out.
 
  #4  
Old 04-04-03, 10:15 AM
Bambi
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textured ceiling

I want to thank you both for responding to my inquiry and welcoming me into the forum! I'm sure I'll have more inquiries in the near future and am really glad I came across this while surfing the internet looking for direction.

I'm pretty new at this and don't know the lango very well. I apologize because I just realized I failed to mention that there is a brush type pattern involved when I referenced it was light in texture. I believe that's an important piece of information (although I must say, Trying2Help, your second suggestion was a similar direction I was headed in with using a stiff bristil brush). Let me try again.....maybe it's better known as a swirl pattern. I'll try and describe it and maybe you guys can straighten me out and help me broaden my vocab.

It apears that a brush type tool was used. Approx. 6 inches long. The 'brush' was placed against the ceiling and was rotated 90 degrees (with one end of the tool remaining still). There's grooves from the brush marks that seems to have something (like sand although not quite that small) mixed in with the paint that was used.

Like Awesomedell said - get it as close as possible and be happy. That's all I want cuz I know it's not going to match perfectly considering I'm trying to match somebody elses work.

Thanks again guys and I will definitely keep you posted on the outcome once it's done.
 
  #5  
Old 04-04-03, 10:48 AM
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Test it on a old piece of drywall first to see what it will look like.

Sounds like whoever did the design, placed an thin amount of texture on the ceiling and that went back with a 6" flat brush (I can see this in my mind, but can not think of the name). I believe you can get on a the hardware store in the roofing, painting or texture areas. Nothing more than a brush 1" X 6" with a wooden handle.
Anyhow place the bush and rotate it 90 degrees to make the design. I have seen some rotated 180 degrees. 90 would make it look somewhat like a sea shell?

The small particales, I am not sure what they would be, but I know you can place "beads" in the texture or paint and maybe get the same effect. These are usually in the texture/paint area of the store.

As you can tell, don't feel bad about knowing the name of everythig, just hope you can get the point across. Someone with the name will come along.

I have done quite a few touch-ups and remodel jobs and alot of the time it has been trail and error. The nice thing with texture, is it is fairly easy to redo if you don't like the way it turns out. Just wet it and scrap it off.

Like AwesomeDell said, you probally will not match it, but should be able to get close.....It is all in the wrist.
 
  #6  
Old 04-04-03, 01:38 PM
HVAC hack
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One thing I do when matching brushed texturing is to go over the existing pattern with the clean brush in order to get used to the stroke for the pattern. If you do this a few times right before texturing you will become better familiar with the wrist movement used.
 
  #7  
Old 04-04-03, 02:12 PM
Bambi
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Textured ceiling

You guys are awesome.

I've already been to Lowe's and couldn't find the type of brush I was wanting. Never thought to try the hardware store down around the corner not to mention familiarizing myself with the brush stroke either.

I have some other tasks to complete in addition to this one. I'll definitely let you you guys know what I used and how it turned out should I get it accomplished over the weekend.

Thanks again!

Bambi
 
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