Plaster Wall Replacement with Drywall

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  #1  
Old 04-28-03, 12:30 AM
c7r7i7s7
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Plaster Wall Replacement with Drywall

Hi this is my first post.
I am dealing with a wall that is not drywall. To be honest, it doesn't really feel like Plaster either. It's some kind've thin sheet, is this what sheet rock is like?

My question is that I want, not really want..but my wife wants me to replace it with drywall.

If it's plaster, will I have to tear out all those wood slats or "sticks", if i may, and will there be 2x4's behind them to attach the drywall too? I want to find out before I get into a mess I can't get out of.

By the way, I've never drywalled, but have seen the steps. Great huh?

Any advise or answers would be great.

I'm a heck of an electrician and plumber though
 
  #2  
Old 04-28-03, 07:02 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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There are a couple of ways to find out if the wall in question was constructed with sheetrock (drywall) or with plaster and lath (wood slats). The age of the home is probably the first way, but poking a small 'out of line of sight' hole in a closet is another, as is opening up an electrical switch and peeking through the box, as is using an old fashioned stud finder - the kind with the magnet. If you run the magnet type stud finder up and down the studs it will react to all of the many, MANY nails that were driven through the wood slats needed for the plaster.
 
  #3  
Old 04-29-03, 02:43 AM
c7r7i7s7
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Okay..Sheetrock is drywall..wasn't sure.
I did that last night on a different wall, and there are studs behind it, so that's good. The walls just feel so much more solid than drywall, i just wasn't sure.
Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 04-29-03, 06:33 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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Just for some better clarification; all walls have studs behind them. They could be wood, metal, and be 16 or 24 inches apart, perfectly plumb or crooked - all depending on the techniques popular at the time the wall in question was erected and dependent on the skills and ability of the installer.

How a wall 'feels' often isn't a good indication of it's composition - sheetrock or plaster - because sheetrock or drywall comes in various thicknesses and the thicker it is the more stable or sound it will feel. Plaster too, depending on how it was applied, how many coats, and it's total thickness will also feel more solid the thicker it is.

A stud finder will locate studs, but it won't tell you if it's plaster or drywall unless you scan a couple of studs from top to bottom with a magnetic stud finder.

Drywall will have a screw or nail approximatley every 6 +/- inches and the magnet will react to them every 6 +/- inches - but plaster lath walls have hundreds of horizontal narrow slats and, the nails used to fasten them to the studs are every 2 +/- inches apart, and the magnetic stud finder will react every 2 +/- inches - so scanning your stud with a magnetic stud finder will let you now where the nails are and how far apart they are and therefore give you the answer as to whether the wall is plaster or sheetrock - as will the other methods described above. Usually removing the cover to an electric wall switch and peeking in works.
 
 

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