Drywall Over Plaster Ceiling


  #1  
Old 05-24-03, 05:03 PM
fred2002
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Drywall Over Plaster Ceiling

I recently bought a house built in the mid-60's which has what I am guessing is a veneer plaster over rock lath (I took out a small piece of wall and it looks like about 5/16" of drywall, about 3/16" of a gray cement-like substrate, and about a 1/16-1/8" veneer white finish plaster).

The kitchen/breakfast room ceiling looks terrible -- it has alot of water leak damage and ridges in the ceiling (about 16" apart -- that is also why I thought it was rock lath).

Instead of trying to repair the plaster damage, I thought the easiest thing to do would be to cover up the entire ceiling with 3/8" regular drywall. The area is about 12' by 20'. The house has 16" oc joists.

Is this the recommended thing to do?

If so, is there any pitfalls that I should be considering -- for example, too much additional weight for the joists, any problem with drywall screws through the rock lath, others???
 
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Old 05-26-03, 04:55 AM
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Hi Fred,

I'd say you've got your problem pegged pretty well from the description.

Assuming the cause of the water damage has been found & repaired. I'd say yes to go over it with drywall, however I'd go with 1/2" instead of the 3/8" (3/8 is too thin for lids, it'll sag in a few yrs)

Locate & mark all your joist prior to starting. Run you drywall across the studs, not with them. I typically use drywall nails to tack the sheet along the edges & screw off the rest with grabber drywall screws.

Make sure your fasteners are long enough to go thru the new drywall, plaster & lath & at least 1/2" into the studs. Recruit some help or else rent a drywall lift to get the sheets up. Sheets should be fastened on each stud with 5 fasteners, 1 in each recessed seam, about 1/2" in from edge, & the other 3 spaced equally in the field of the sheet, on every stud.

Hope that helps.

Good luck.
 
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Old 05-26-03, 05:15 AM
Gary7
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I agree with the first response, however there is something additional you may want to consider.

Prior to fastening the drywall to the existing ceiling, I recommend you screw 1x3 perpendicular to your ceiling joists. Beginning on one side, run your material at 12" centers. This will firm up the existing plaster/sheetrock and remove any apparent sags. Make certain to hit the ceiling joists when you screw the 1x3 in place with a 3" screw or better. Install the sheetrock as described in first response.
 
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Old 05-26-03, 05:51 AM
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I'd buy the idea of the 1"x3" securing the plaster a bit more, but removing any wave? If it's screwed to the studs it will form to the studs, thus you'll still have the wave. If the ceiling had noticible wave, I'd remove the plaster & lath, & install shims where needed to flatten the ceiling, but unless it's extremely pronounced, it'll be taken care of with the finishing process.
 
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Old 05-26-03, 01:24 PM
Gary7
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What wave.

You must have more information than me. I didn't read anything about a wave. However, if there was one, 1x3's can be shimed.
 
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Old 05-26-03, 06:24 PM
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Cool

I agree. Anything can be shimmed.
"Ridges"="Waves"=Same Thing, I guess.
Needs new drywall over old ceiling.
Mike
 
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Old 05-27-03, 05:46 AM
Gary7
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The reason there are ridges under the joists is because water leaking from above will travel along the joists. The result is a loosening of the plaster where the water has tended to concentrate. Is this case, the result was ridges on the joists. 1x3's will screwed into the joists will eliminate the ridges and flatten the ceiling to the joists.

Waves or ridges is the issue here. Achieving a firm base for new drywall is the objective and I don't think anyone can dispute the fact the stripping the ceiling out with 1x3 will produce an end result better then not stripping the ceiling.
 
 

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