Dangerous Inhalation - Abestos

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  #1  
Old 06-14-03, 10:52 AM
Superman
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Dangerous Inhalation - Abestos

I heard that acoustic popcorn ceiling has abestos in it. I read many other posts from TwelvePole that it is better to leave it alone and hire a professional to remove it. I am planning to have it test.

How do I do that?

Also, I like to ask an additional important question. Besides abestos in ceiling, what other do-it-yourself project should I be careful in terms of Inhalation? When removing linolium tiles with adhesive underneath, does that also contain any abestos? In other words, what else that can effect the respiratory system?

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 06-14-03, 03:04 PM
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If you suspect a problem, it can be good idea to hire a professional to perform a test to determine exactly what you have.
 
  #3  
Old 06-14-03, 03:44 PM
Superman
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I am not suspecting anything but just want to be on the safe side. Still, I have lots of do-it-yourself projects coming up. What else should I watch out for such as deadly inhalation stuff. I did not even know about Abesto until someone mentioned it to me a few weeks ago.

I am going to hire someone to come to my house and do a test for Abesto.

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 06-14-03, 04:27 PM
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Some paints manufactured prior to 1975 may have lead in them. I don't remember when window and door glass was first required to have safety tempering, but glass manufactured prior to that will shatter rather than break into beads. Sliding glass door and glass doors now have tempered glass in them to prevent shattering into shards. Older houses with two wire circuits don't have the protective grounds now common in wiring. Older electric dryer circuits may not meet current wiring safety codes. Aluminum wiring is prone to create problems when used in fixtures not compatible with aluminum wiring. This may cause fires. Unfortunately, some DIY work done around houses was not done correctly and may present hidden hazards for structural inadequacy, improper wiring, poor plumbing work, and so forth.

It is important to collect information about what you plan to do and to use so that you can be aware of potential hazards with things that look odd, out of sorts, or just plain strange.

There is a vast offering of books out there and internet information. But best of all, we have all these folks here on this bulletin board. Even if you are not suspicious, being on the safe side is an excellent idea.

I am a big fan of being on the safe side.
Hope this helps, and bring your questions here for us to help.
 
  #5  
Old 06-14-03, 05:23 PM
Superman
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Greatly, Greatly appreciate your dedication to this thread Chfite. Yes, I agree that saftey is the number one thing. I am planning to have kids soon and want to make my house contaminate free.
 
  #6  
Old 06-16-03, 12:43 PM
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Acoustic texture was NOT manufactured prior to strict asbestos regulations. There is no and never was asbestos in Acoustic texture.
 
  #7  
Old 07-25-03, 10:54 PM
Superman
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When you say Acoustic texture, you mean popcorn right?

Thanks
 
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