paint sheetrock


  #1  
Old 06-16-03, 10:36 AM
anp856
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paint sheetrock

Hi there,

A pro painter tells me that I have to (or he has to) put a layer of plaster over our new sheetrock in order to be able to have a nice painted finish in the end.

Can't you just prime and paint the sheetrock?

He says the difference in texture/absorption between the joint compound and the sheetrock will show.

Thanks,
Carol
 
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Old 06-16-03, 11:07 AM
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Sounds like there was a miscommunication! Plaster is typically applied to lathe strips. Sheetrock is primed and painted. The primer will give you an even finish on sheetrock. It also cuts down on the number of coats of paint you have to apply to achieve the smooth and even finish. Using primer instead of standard paint makes all the difference in the world. That said, make sure the joints have been sanded smooth, use a cloth to remove any lingering dust and apply primer. Once that has dried, you can paint and enjoy your newly redone room!
Sandie
 
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Old 06-16-03, 01:32 PM
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If your walls are in good condition then paint them. He is right about the seems showing. It's called flashing. That is why you prime and then paint. Priming seals everything and then your color coat will dry evenly. If your walls are in bad shape then more work will have to be done. And don't use plaster use drywall mud.
 
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Old 06-16-03, 01:34 PM
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Ok just re read your post and you said new walls. Paint it!!
 
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Old 06-16-03, 04:43 PM
mudder
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paint sheetrock

Actually he's right about the diference in texture and feeling of a skim coated wall compared to just the taped sheetrock.BUT if the taping was done in an acceptable manner then he doesn't HAVE to. But if you have the extra money it does make a big difference.
 
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Old 06-17-03, 08:01 PM
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Mudder is right, must be a drywaller. Hopefully your painter is a pro & knows to use joint compound instead of the plaster. The primer is the key to hiding the seams under the paint tho. Keep in mind if there's imperfections in the wall before you prime they'll still show up in the finish paint.

 
 

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