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bedroom remodeling


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08-30-00, 02:34 PM   #1  
The house is a 1986 split-level. We want to remove the wall between the two 'back' bedrooms (at the end of the hall). In one room it's closet, in the other it is a wall with duct returns. I'm not sure if this is a load bearing wall. I would also like to knock out the ceiling to the roof level (in this master bedroom only) so as to put in skylights. Is this possible? Thank You.

 
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08-30-00, 09:38 PM   #2  
You will need to determine if the wall you want to remove is a bearing wall or not. If it runs in the same direction as the ridge of the roof over it, or if it runs in the opposite direction as the ceiling joists above it, treat it as a bearing wall.

THAT'S NOT HOW SKYLIGHTS ARE INSTALLED!! First, if the house was built in '86, more than likely it has trusses. DO NOT ALTER THEM! Plan the location of your skylights around where the trusses are, cut a hole in the roof for the skylight, use the trusses for the sidewalls of the shaft, and frame in the end walls of the shaft. The only portion of the ceiling you remove is the bottom of the light shaft. And make sure you insulate the walls of the shaft WELL! Skylights are very energy INEFFICIENT unless they are well insulated. (I used R-38 on mine.) <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Scuttle-Butt:
The house is a 1986 split-level. We want to remove the wall between the two 'back' bedrooms (at the end of the hall). In one room it's closet, in the other it is a wall with duct returns. I'm not sure if this is a load bearing wall. I would also like to knock out the ceiling to the roof level (in this master bedroom only) so as to put in skylights. Is this possible? Thank You.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


 
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09-01-00, 06:34 AM   #3  
Thanks Lefty! I am familiar with the method you describe for framing for a skylight, I should have said we are interested in a vaulted ceiling, but it sounds as if this would have had to have been planned for during construction.Yes?

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by lefty:
You will need to determine if the wall you want to remove is a bearing wall or not. If it runs in the same direction as the ridge of the roof over it, or if it runs in the opposite direction as the ceiling joists above it, treat it as a bearing wall.

THAT'S NOT HOW SKYLIGHTS ARE INSTALLED!! First, if the house was built in '86, more than likely it has trusses. DO NOT ALTER THEM! Plan the location of your skylights around where the trusses are, cut a hole in the roof for the skylight, use the trusses for the sidewalls of the shaft, and frame in the end walls of the shaft. The only portion of the ceiling you remove is the bottom of the light shaft. And make sure you insulate the walls of the shaft WELL! Skylights are very energy INEFFICIENT unless they are well insulated. (I used R-38 on mine.)
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



 
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