wallboard over plaster


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Old 11-03-03, 10:48 AM
kralspace
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wallboard over plaster

I have a plaster ceiling that is cracked pretty bad. The owner wants to wallboard over it instead of taking it down and replacing with wallboard (cost and mess issues). Is it okay to cover? What size wallboard should be used (1/4, 3/8, or 1/2)? Does it matter?

Is there another solution that would work better than wallboard?

Thanks,
 
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Old 11-03-03, 11:17 AM
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I think the best way is to tear out and hang new. But it is a huge mess. I can understand why people just want to cover it. If it's just cracked but otherwise in good shape I would fix cracks and skim smooth. By good shape I mean It isn't falling off the ceiling. One test is to push on it. If it feels spongy or loose then better to cover it up.

The best size to cover plaster, in my opinion, is 3/8". 3/8" weighs less than 1/2". Also 1/4" will bend to every curve of your ceiling. 3/8" will be a bit straighter. Also 1/4" is very hard to handle. It breaks and chips very easily. I've simply picked a sheet up once and it broke.
 
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Old 11-03-03, 10:36 PM
kralspace
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Thanks for the test idea. I will check for spongy or loose on Thursday and go from there. I will be doing this ceiling without help so 3/8 will be the wallboard of choice then. If the ceiling is solid, wish me luck trying to convince the homeowner that I could fix the cracks and skim the entire ceiling faster and cheaper than wallboard. Someone must of told her to cover it, so she seems to be fixed on this idea.

Originally posted by coops28
I think the best way is to tear out and hang new. But it is a huge mess. I can understand why people just want to cover it. If it's just cracked but otherwise in good shape I would fix cracks and skim smooth. By good shape I mean It isn't falling off the ceiling. One test is to push on it. If it feels spongy or loose then better to cover it up.

The best size to cover plaster, in my opinion, is 3/8". 3/8" weighs less than 1/2". Also 1/4" will bend to every curve of your ceiling. 3/8" will be a bit straighter. Also 1/4" is very hard to handle. It breaks and chips very easily. I've simply picked a sheet up once and it broke.
 
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Old 11-04-03, 07:48 AM
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No problem. Doing it yourself? How big is your ceiling? They only sell 3/8" in 8' lengths so that is what you will get. Its going to be very hard to do it by yourself because the sheet will bend a lot. Its hard to line it up when the ends are sagging. What I do is nail a piece of 2x4 (about 2' long) ,about 1/2" down from the ceiling, to the wall. Then you can slide the one end on top of the board and have it hold that end up while you are at the other end. If you have a big ceiling (14' or so) then you can do the same thing with the butt joint. Nail the board so it covers the end of the first sheet and hangs out to catch the next sheet.

Boy that was wordy. I hope it helps.
 
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Old 11-04-03, 08:19 AM
kralspace
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Thanks for the 2x4 idea. I was thinking of making a T and prop up the wallboard in place. The short 2x4's is much more manageable. I will use screws of course and move them around as needed.

Thanks again for the information. I feeling better about this job already.

Do you know much about doors? I replaced an entry door between two exisitng side panels and had limited clearence for adjustments. I also had to remove the door to install the pre-hung frame and this was a mistake. The door now drops 1/8 from the top hinge and I need to straighten it out. I am not able to easily remove the frame now because the outside was recently stucco'd over. Can I just mortise the hinges more to make up for the offset or will this get me in more trouble?
 
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Old 11-04-03, 08:30 AM
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don't know a whole lot about the door stuff but, I have seen guys put a 3" screw in the top hinge to suck it up.
 
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Old 11-04-03, 11:22 AM
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Coops28:
Won't 3/8" tend to sag between the supports? If this were over joists, it would have to be 1/2" for 16" centers and 5/8" for 24" centers. I was always under the impression it didn't matter whether or not the board was over joists or over an existing ceiling; do I have some bad information?

kralspace:
You might also look into renting a drywall lift if you're working alone. You just place the board on the brackets, tilt it so the board is horizontal, and crank it up to the ceiling. I have used it in the past to put 12' pieces on the ceiling by myself. Much, much easier than lifting by hand and using the tees.

Bruce
 
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Old 11-05-03, 01:22 AM
kralspace
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I stopped and got a United Rentals catalog and saw the Drywall Jack. What a cool tool. If I rent it to take care of my customer, I'll also have to do my garage/shop that evening to justify the cost. I could also use 1/2 drywall because it won't be that heavy to handle alone.

Thanks for all the suggestions.

BTY, The project is a 12x13 bedroom ceiling (not worth renting equipment for). I'm not sure what caused the cracks because I haven't seen them yet. The customer is a new referral and I will be doing the work on Thursday. I will be patching the plaster wall cracks as well.
 
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Old 11-05-03, 10:16 PM
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I gotta tell if I was doin that ceiling 12'x13', I'd recruit a helper for 1/2 a day & use 12' 1/2" rock, would eliminate the butt joints in the ceiling. Use Coops idea with the 2"x4", the tees just end up in the way, or else breakin your sheet. I can hang 10 lid sheets that way alone in a pinch, but I do this for a living. Drywall lift, thought that was what the top of your head was for Just kiddin, lot of DIYers use them I guess, every rental yard I was ever in has one..

Bruce H to answer your question, the 3/8" would be fine in this case, you'd be going over a solid surface. Have used it alot in that sort of situation, gotta mark the studs & use long enough screw to hit them. Little drywall adhesive too.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 10:04 AM
kralspace
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The job is done and it looks great. Thanks for the tips. The 2x4's were absolutely the best along with my 8ft latter to balance sheet. I did have help also but still had trouble getting the corner fit on the first piece. The "lift" is what this kid is going to use the next time I have a ceiling to do. My shoulders are really sore today after hanging and taping the last two days.

Again, thanks for your input. Now I have another question that I will post as a separate chain.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 04:53 PM
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Good job. Glad to help.
 
 

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