4x4 header/cedar wood

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Old 11-26-03, 04:27 PM
telefunken
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4x4 header/cedar wood

at home depot by me they now sell 4x4 [8ft long] studs, that appears would be perfect for a header.

the wood appears to be cedar however, would this be ok to use for a header in a non load bearing wall?
 
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Old 11-27-03, 04:56 AM
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8' cedar 4"x4", sounds like a mailbox post to me. Kind of overkill for a header in a non load-bearing wall don't ya think?
 
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Old 11-27-03, 08:02 AM
telefunken
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Re: 4x4 header/cedar wood

awesomedell, happy thanksgiving!

i was advised to use a 4x4 header [in the form of 2 2x4s and 1/2 mdf] for my door headers because the door im using is rather heavy, 1 5/8" solid core / 32" w/ 5/4 stock jamb.

also, ive been planning on using a 4x4 header for my window, the window is 7' wide, by 37 1/2" high. is this overkill? heck id love to just use a 2x4 on its side, save me a lot of trouble.

this is a basement that i am converting into a recording studio, so the window wont open its just a pane of glass in a wood jamb.
 
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Old 11-27-03, 09:16 PM
bungalow jeff
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The header provides no support for the door. 2-2x4's w/ 1/2" plywood or osb is the standard size for non-structural headers. It matches the 2x4 stud width (3 1/2").
 
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Old 11-28-03, 11:00 AM
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I think what jeff is trying to say, please correct me if I'm wrong, is that your support for your door is with the King stud and trimmers. In other words double up your studs on either side of the rough opening to provide more support. Forget about the 4x4.
 
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Old 11-28-03, 10:22 PM
bungalow jeff
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Originally posted by coops28
I think what jeff is trying to say, please correct me if I'm wrong, is that your support for your door is with the King stud and trimmers. In other words double up your studs on either side of the rough opening to provide more support. Forget about the 4x4.
yup.
 
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Old 11-29-03, 09:45 AM
telefunken
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so the header should just be a flat 2x4 if the wall is non load bearing, regardless of how wide the opening is for lets say a window?
 
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Old 11-29-03, 01:51 PM
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Yes, but you will still have to fill in with studs from the rough opening up to the ceiling. These studs are called jack studs I think.
 
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Old 11-29-03, 04:41 PM
brickeyee
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Studs less than full length are all 'cripple' studs, except the studs from sole plate to a header that are fillers or trimmers. King is sometimes used for the last full length stud beside an opening, particularly a door. Rafters are more descriptive. A jack never goes from plate to ridge board. Hip jacks go from plate to a hip rafter, valley jacks from the ridge to a valley rafter, and cripple jacks from a hip rafter to a valley rafter. For a very good reference see Feirer & Hutchins, ?Guide to Residential Carpentry?. Occasionally dated (copyright 1983) but a very good place to start.
 
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