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Removed wood panelling - salvage drywall?


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01-28-04, 08:06 PM   #1  
cruster
Removed wood panelling - salvage drywall?

Hey there - I'm a first time home owner trying to do some cosmetic remodelling to my basement rec room. The previous owner did a very nice job installing some truly awful "wood" panelling on one wall. I have taken it down with the hopes of patching the drywall underneath (walls were finished, just not painted), spray texturing the wall, and repainting.
What is the easiest way for me to prep the drywall? There is a lot of glue left on the walls, and it's not coming off easily - not without tearing the paper. I can deal with the nails and the little bit of patching that needs to be done, but I'm at a bit of a loss as to how to deal with the glue. I have tried scraping but it seems like I was doing more harm than good - I just don't want to make any more work for myself than is absolutely necessary...

 
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01-29-04, 05:32 AM   #2  
Welcome aboard cruster.

Dried liquid nails, break out the elec sander & just try to be careful & not eat thru the glue & paper & gypsum. Don't know no better way, other than overlaying the wall with fresh board, but that's maybe a bit more work than you were hoping for.

 
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01-29-04, 05:55 AM   #3  
Or you can scrape off the glue. Yes as you have been seen the face paper of the rock will come with it. After you get the glue off sand down the fuzzy brown paper. Put a skim of mud over it. Now you will have some blisters. cut them away and do another skim over the surface. One more coat and then sand lightly. Prime the entire wall. Now you will be able to see what will show. go back and touch up if needed.

 
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01-29-04, 06:20 AM   #4  
cruster
Thanks!

I'm fine with doing work - I want this done right!

What's the best way to scrape or sand the walls though so that I cause the least amount of damage? The construction adhesive is pretty brittle. Can I get away with an electric sander? Should I be using a sanding block? A scraper?

 
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01-29-04, 06:25 AM   #5  
How much drywall are you dealing with? Personally, I would rip out the old drywall and hang new. It will probably be faster than trying to restore the old stuff - and you'll get a nice new surface to work with.

 
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01-29-04, 09:08 AM   #6  
cruster
Well...

That's not the worst idea I've heard, and I'm kind of on a timeline so it might actually be the quickest too. It had crossed my mind...the problem is that I've never hung drywall before. The wall is exactly 32' long - there are 8 4'x8' panels up currently and I don't believe that they were cut or trimmed. The adjacent wall would also need to be finished, which is two full 4'x8' panels, plus a third panel with a cut-out for the doorway.

Hmm...I wonder if this would in fact be easier than trying to sand the current drywall, spread two coats of mud, then texture.

Actually...I wonder if alternatively I would be better off trying to get a quote for about 350 of drywall work, seeing as how I have guests coming in 10 days. Maybe if hanging new drywall is the best option this isn't the optimal time for me to learn.


Last edited by cruster; 01-29-04 at 09:22 AM.
 
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01-29-04, 10:17 AM   #7  
From my point of view, it's a no brainer. You'll spend hours (perhaps days) removing the old adhesive, then another day or so taping and sanding the patches in the old drywall.

From your description of the room, I would estimate a day (or less) to rip the old drywall and another day to hang new.

One idea might be to hire a handyman to help and let him/her show you how it's done.

 
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01-29-04, 10:53 AM   #8  
cruster
That's not a bad idea, seeing it actually happening would be the best experience...this might be a dumb question but any idea what something like that would cost...?

 
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01-29-04, 12:52 PM   #9  
Thats a fine idea but it will cost a lot more in material and you will have to finish the new rock. You will have to carry the old material out of the basement and get rid of it. Then carry the new stuff down. If you use 8' rock horizontally you will have 8 sheets to deal with. Another consideration is if you have textured ceilings. you will have to angle tape against it and fix the texture. For me I would get a good stiff sharp scraper and go for it.

 
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01-29-04, 01:12 PM   #10  
cruster
I'm in.

Alright, I'm going to try and sand and scrape and see what I can do. I figure that ultimately I'm doing orange peel texture on the wall (to match the adjoining walls) so the underlying drywall doesn't need to be pitch perfect. Wish me luck...and thanks for all the help, it is very much appreciated. I'm really glad I stumbled into this website. I'll report back.

 
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01-29-04, 04:47 PM   #11  
Several years ago, my price list went like this;

$30/hr to do the job
$40/hr if the customer wants to watch
$50/hr if the customer wants to help
$80/hr for lessons


 
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01-30-04, 03:50 PM   #12  
I faced the same problem after removing some awful paneling from the wall in our family room (see link to picture below).

I hired out this project to a drywall installer on the side. He "putty filled" this wall. The adhesive was NOT removed, he simply applied three coats of mud and then orange peel textured the wall. It turned out beautiful. The wall measured 8x17 feet and total cost was $325

http://www.impulse.net/~dmaxwell/drywall.jpg

 
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01-30-04, 04:20 PM   #13  
cruster
Take the couch away and that's EXACTLY what my walls look like...
$325 is very reasonable.

 
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01-31-04, 02:05 AM   #14  
Rainbird,
any chance we could see a pic of the refinished wall?

 
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01-31-04, 08:13 AM   #15  
Not a problem Dell (see link below).

A little more info for cruster. The drywall installer applied the next coat of mud after the previous coat had throughly dried. This was about two days between. He used a large tape knife and it took about twenty minutes to apply each coat. A plastic curtain was hung from the ceiling when he applied the texture.

http://www.impulse.net/~dmaxwell/drywall2.jpg

 
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02-01-04, 04:29 AM   #16  
Indeed your pro did a fine job there Rainbird! I'm curious as whether or not he applied a primer on the wall prior to starting the mudding process, some of the adhesives will bleed thru the mud coat.

 
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02-01-04, 08:05 AM   #17  
No primer was applied and no bleed thru was apparent after the second coat.

When the job was complete, I let it throughly dry and applied a coat of Benjamin Moore primer. Then I applied the final coat of paint to match the existing walls.

 
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