hanging drywall - any easy way?

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  #1  
Old 05-19-04, 12:55 PM
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hanging drywall - any easy way?

Hi,

I'm working on drywalling 4 rooms in my house. Have already hung a few sheets.

Here's the problem - I'm pretty much working by myself. I'm not a big guy and these sheets are heavy. My wife (who is obviously also not a big guy) has been helping, however, each sheet is accompanied by a bit of complaining about the weight of the sheet (by both of the not big guys).

I'd like to make this easier. I know there is a drywall jack thingy I can rent to do ceilings, can this device or some other device help with hanging the stuff on the walls too?

thanks!
 
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Old 05-20-04, 07:23 AM
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I've never used a drywall lift, but as far as I know you can only use them for hanging ceilings. When you go to hang the walls, start a nail or two on each end of the sheet at the top. then lift the sheet up and make sure it's tight up to the ceiling sheet, be sure you've got your hatchet ready so you can quickly drive those nails in & relieve some of the strain of holding the sheet up. Now you can't just tack it up & let it hang there for any length of time either, soon as it's tacked up, grab the screwgun & start screwing off the sheet.

You can also build a T-brace to aid in holding the sheet up. To build them for the ceiling, measure the distance from the bottom of the rafters to the floor, now subtract from that # the thickness of the drywall (1/2" or 5/8" usually) and then subtract another 1&1/2" for the 2"x on the top of the brace. So if it's 98" from the floor to the ceiling & you're hanging 5/8" rock, you would cut a 2"x4" to 95 & 7/8", then cut another 2'x4" down to like 2' or 3' long & attach it to one end of the longer one with a couple of 2" screws, or 16p nails. Now you've got a perfectly sized brace that can hold one end of the sheet up. You can follow the same concept for hanging walls, although I can't say that I've tried it.

Another trick for hanging lids (ceilings) alone, is to screw a 2"x board, 2' to 4' long to the wall studs about 5/8" down from the underside of the joists. You can then get the sheet up to the lid & tight down to that wall the board will help support the weight of that end of the sheet.

Now this concept I have used to hang long wall sheets w/o a helper. Measure down from the ceiling 4' & then screw a 2"x across a couple of studs on either end of where the sheet will hang. Then get in the center of the sheet & lift it up & tilt it back towards yourself just slightly & sit it on top of the 2"xs, then press it back against the studs. I've done that to hang long sheets, 14', 16' on a wall by myself, but I don't recommend trying to do it unless there's no other option.

Another suggestion, know any big strong teenage boys in your neighborhood? Recruit some temporary help to get the board hung, in the long run it'll be worth the relief on you & your wife's bodys and you probablly get it all hung in one day, or certainly within one weekend.

Hope that helps out & good luck.
 
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Old 05-20-04, 08:24 AM
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thanks awesomedell.

we've already tried the 2 x 4 T shape to help hold up on the ceiling. It does help. I'll try the 2 x 4's for the wall too. it makes sense =)

ultimately, i probably will hire a helper or 2.

thanks!
 
  #4  
Old 05-26-04, 07:13 AM
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Yep, you can use the jack to hang drywall on the walls. It's a bit tricky, but can be done and will still take both of you to minimize the amount of cussin' .

On one side of the jack are a couple of metal hooks for holding the drywall (at least on the one we rented, I'm assuming they're mostly all the same.) Put your sheet on the jack while it's horizontal, position it fairly close to the wall you're hanging, hooks closeset to the wall, and lock the wheels. Tilt the jack as far as it will go (it won't go dead vertical, but close.) One person gently tilts the top edge of the sheet over against the wall and also makes sure the sheet doesn't slide off the hooks while the other cranks it up until the top gets close to the ceiling. At this point you may need to unlock the wheels and re-position the jack to get the sheet as close to final position as possible. Crank it on up. The top should be against the studs at least where somebody can climb up and whack 3 or 4 nails or a put a few drywall screws in. It really doesn't take that many to hold it for the few minutes it will take to crank the lift down and pull it away so you can access the rest of the panel. Been there done that .
 
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Old 05-27-04, 08:09 AM
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I'm going with the "hire a young guy" method. And it's going well. thanks all!
 
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Old 05-27-04, 01:30 PM
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Even though the pros scoff

hanging the walls vertical allows you to do them with one person and a foot lift
 
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Old 05-31-04, 07:57 AM
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Caley is right about standing up sheets being easier to handle alone, by it'll give you more finishing to do, which is the more difficult part of the process.
 
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Old 05-31-04, 07:59 AM
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Caley is right about standing up sheets being easier to handle alone, by it'll give you more finishing to do, which is the more difficult part of the process. I don't recommend using this method for normal residential construction.
 
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