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Knockdown texture conistency and wallpaper removal


Vandy's Avatar
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06-05-04, 08:53 PM   #1  
Vandy
Knockdown texture conistency and wallpaper removal

Okay, my first post. I apologize now for asking questions that have probably been asked a million times and answered by you regulars...a million times. I took time to search for answers first, but since I am new to this site I was inefficient.

1) What is the secret to obtaining the correct consistency of dry wall mud when mixing joint compound and water (for hopper application)

2) I have heard many times to make sure you remove ALL the wallpaper. However under our wallpaper there is a thin white layer that will not come up with any process that we have tried. It has some some brush marks like it was brushed on and becomes slightly rubbery when wet, but still only peels in tiny pieces.

Does anyone know what this is? Is it glue?

Can we texture over it, or will it be detrimental?

Thanks in advance for any help.

 
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06-06-04, 12:24 PM   #2  
Get off as much of the wallpaper and other stuff as possible. Prime the walls first. Then mix your mud like pancake batter. It needs to be really loose to get pushed through the hopper. It also depends on what rig you are spraying with.

 
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06-06-04, 06:20 PM   #3  
there is a thin white layer that will not come up with any process that we have tried. It has some some brush marks like it was brushed on and becomes slightly rubbery when wet, but still only peels in tiny pieces.
Sounds to me like its an acrylic priming/sizing. I don't think it needs to be removed, but I would prime over it with an alkyd primer or a drywall sealer (like Zinsser's GARDZ or Scotch Paints DrawTite) to make sure its sealed down tight, provding a stable surface for the next steps.

 
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