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Furnace, access panel vs door covering it?


MagusOfAtlan's Avatar
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07-27-04, 11:19 AM   #1  
MagusOfAtlan
Furnace, access panel vs door covering it?

Hi guys! I'm building a rec room in my basement, but am trying to determine what to put in front of the furnace. It's loud, and I want to keep the sound down as much as possible.

My options include:
1. Standard solid-core oak door. Would look great, be kind of expensive, and still let a lot of the noise through.

2. Access panel made of wood, with the backing made of homasote (sound-absorbing 1/2" board).

3. Access panel made of 5/8" drywall, backed with 1/2" homasote. This would be kind of heavy, but would make the best sound barrier.

The wall in question is right next to the front of the furnace, in a hallway that will be finished (carpeted, drywalled). I doubt it needs to be accessed but a few times a year (the filters can be changed from the unfinished area behind the furnace), and all 3 other sides of the furnace (other than the front) will be easily accessible in this unfinished area.

Any thoughts on how to cover it up, deaden the sound, and make it look nice?

Thanks for any suggestions!

 
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07-27-04, 12:11 PM   #2  
Hello: MagusOfAtlan

If applicable, keep in mind the furnace uses air for both combustion and venting from within the basement or area it is located in. Therefore, the heater cannot be boxed into any sealed (unventilated) enclosure.

I read and re read the fifth long paragraph in your question. From that I cannot be sure what is meant by >"all 3 other sides of the furnace (other than the front) will be easily accessible in this unfinished area."<

If that means only the furnace front will be behind a door, meaning the other 3 sides will be visable and unobstructed, chances are all will be okay. If that means there will be room or space around the furnace but the door will make the area around the furnace a closet or closed in area, fresh air intake vents will be required.

Local codes dictate where they are to be placed and the sizing. Sizing usually is one square inch per 1,000 btu's. Half the vent area vents up and the other half down. Lower vents usually a few inches above floor level. Upper vents likewise. Check local codes.

Failure to provide combustion intake air or any restrictions of such will cause furnace combustion and venting problems which produce carbon monoxides, etc. Use extreme caution. Health & life depends upon proper funace operations and ventilations.


Regards and Good Luck.
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07-27-04, 12:54 PM   #3  
MagusOfAtlan
Thanks for the answer.

The furnace won't be boxed in - it'll end up in a good sized room, an unfinished part of the basement. The hallway leading up to this unfinished area ends right in front of the furnace, but the furnace will only be close to this one wall, otherwise there will be lots of air space in that section.

I'll have to look at the furnace to see where the vents are for it. Knowing my fortune they'll all be on the front of the furnace, but the furnace itself won't be boxed or enclosed, unless you consider a room about 10' wide and 20' long enclosed.

>>>Failure to provide combustion intake air or any restrictions of such will cause furnace combustion and venting problems which produce carbon monoxides, etc. Use extreme caution. Health & life depends upon proper funace operations and ventilations.<<<

That's a great reminder - I'm glad you brought it up!

Here's a quickie picture of the finished areas, and where the furnace is located (under the highest portion under the stairs).
http://www.wpg.org/backup/pic01.gif

Thanks again!

 
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07-27-04, 06:19 PM   #4  
Hi: Magus

Looked at pic drawing. Based upon what is visable, as long as there is fresh intake air for ventilation and combustion air (also known as make up air) all should be fine.

Excuse me for the interuption in your question. Natural reaction from years in the gas safety industry. Especially when partions will be added into large room areas where gas appliances are or appliances will be relocated to.

Seen all to many incorrectly partioning jobs done and far too many CO poisonings, etc. Becomes a natural response to post a cautionary note.

Good Luck with the project.


Regards and Good Luck.
Web Site Admin, Moderator Hiring Agent, Host and Forums Manager. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics and Repair Technician. Fast, Fair, Friendly and Highly Proficient...

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Not only is a mind a terrible thing to waste, it's like a parachute.

It doesn't function until it's OPEN.........

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Gun safety is using BOTH hands!

Driving Safety Reminder:
Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
"The Life You Save, May Be Your Own."

 
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