Folding drywall to fit...

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  #1  
Old 10-25-04, 11:57 AM
sid_freeman
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Folding drywall to fit...

Hi there,
I tried this question in the basement forum but it turned into a debate on building code. My original question had to do with fitting drywall down tight stairs into my basement that has a teeny tiny window. I can't fit a 4x8 piece of drywall down my stairs. The solution I've adpoted is to score one side of the drywall (the bad side facing the stud), turn it over and fold it over on itself. So I'd then have a double thick 4'x4' piece of drywall. When I get it downstairs fold it back open put the broken/scored side facing the studs and screw it to the wall. I guess I'd want to make sure the crack in the drywall lines up with a stud and obviously I don't want to screw the drywall where the crack is so I'd use an adhesive of some type.

My questions are:
Is this an ideal method of getting drywall places it won't go?
Are there any other tricks tips I should be considering to make taping less work?
What should I use as an adhesive for holding drywall to steel studs? (keep in mind the glue would only be on one stud per sheet of drywall).

Hopefully the walls and ceilings thread yeilds better results for me

Thanks in advance.
Sid
 
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  #2  
Old 10-25-04, 01:58 PM
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sounds like a good idea. a couple tubes of liquid nails construction adhesive should do the job. hate to have to take it down though. how tight is the stair case. used to work for a moving company and some mattress' didnt fit. sometimes we would be able to turn it so we could pass it over tha railing. if you have walls on both sides the cutting and folding would probably be the best method.
 
  #3  
Old 10-25-04, 02:08 PM
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Hello Sid,

Yes I agree that the thread did get a bit off topic, but some feel an obligation to steer folks clear of problems.
Your mention of a tiny window in a space you are renovating sets of alarm bells in folks who know about these things.
They are only concerned with your welfare.

Scoring, bending and straightening a sheet of drywall is commonplace.
I did it a couple of times, but in one instance there were noticible marks where bent, that I had to smooth with mud.
 
  #4  
Old 10-26-04, 05:38 AM
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The problem with that is when you fold it over it will loosen the paper on the face thus causing a 4' long blister. You will have to cut this away anyway and tape. If it were me I would tear half the stairwell wall down and rebuild when I was done or cut the sheetrock the largest you can.
 
  #5  
Old 10-26-04, 06:45 AM
sid_freeman
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Unfortunately the wall in the stairwell is solid and it extends up to the second floor of the house It's not load bearing but it also forms the banister upstairs...it'd be a huge job to remove just for drywall.

My wife had a suggestion that I think is a good one...once we get the drywall installed and taped that we just cover the fold (or blister) with a border of wood (maybe 1" or 2" molding) around the perimeter of the room covering the seam. That way we wouldn't have to do all of the extra taping or mudding to cover it up. Paint the bottom half of the wall a different color than the top. It'd look nice. Not sure why I didn't think of this before.
 
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Old 10-26-04, 10:16 AM
Chris S27
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Originally Posted by sid_freeman
Unfortunately the wall in the stairwell is solid and it extends up to the second floor of the house It's not load bearing but it also forms the banister upstairs...it'd be a huge job to remove just for drywall.

My wife had a suggestion that I think is a good one...once we get the drywall installed and taped that we just cover the fold (or blister) with a border of wood (maybe 1" or 2" molding) around the perimeter of the room covering the seam. That way we wouldn't have to do all of the extra taping or mudding to cover it up. Paint the bottom half of the wall a different color than the top. It'd look nice. Not sure why I didn't think of this before.

Sure, sounds like a Chair Rail to me... I would research the proper height for a chair rail though. In my experience it's NOT 4 feet, i believe it's 3 feet, give or take a few! I think dividing the wall in half would look pretty odd. IMHO
 
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Old 10-26-04, 11:54 AM
sid_freeman
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Yeah you're right. Just did a little research and chair rails are typically anywhere from 32" to 42" from the floor. So 3 feet would be just about right. I think I could get a 5 ft peice of drywall down the stairs. We'll see.

Thanks.
 
  #8  
Old 10-26-04, 04:24 PM
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Here is an idea. Why not plaster the wall? Metal lath is 27" X 96" and comes in bundles of ten sheets.
They should fit down the stairs just fine and plaster is very portable. It isn't cheap but is probabaly easier and then think what you have when you're finished.
 
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