Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

drywall mud


drizzt's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-15-04, 11:56 AM   #1  
drizzt
drywall mud

Hello, Can someone tell me why or how air bubbles keep getting into my drywall repairs? How do I get rid of them? I like to keep a bucket of mud and I do a lot of small repairs to my drywall. I put water on top of the mud to keep it fresh and empty the water when I use some. Your help is appreciated

 
Sponsored Links
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

11-16-04, 05:21 AM   #2  
Not quite sure how you're getting air bubbles into the repairs, are you talking about places where the tape isn't sticking? If so it's caused by not having enough mud left under the tape in order for it to bond to the sheetrock.

Mud can be kept in the manner you're describing for a period of time, but if it's kept too long it will begin to mold. Personally I don't save any partial containers, mud just isn't that expensive.

 
Kozmo's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-16-04, 06:10 AM   #3  
Kozmo
Had a similar problem...

A friend of mine who is a contractor had to come over to check it out as he wasn't sure what I was referring to. It turns out that in my house (lath & plaster), I was repairing holes in the plaster and was actually trapping air beneath the mud and above the lath causing it to "bubble up" as I was spreading it. He recommended that I take the thin edge of the knife and cut through the newly applied mud to allow the air to escape and then press it into the crack or the hole and continue spreading until the bubble is gone. It worked! He also stated that when taping and mudding drywall, use your knife to work the bubbles out the side of the tape, working your knife along the tape at a 45 degree angle to the seam, using caution not to pull the tape off the seam or crimp it. It takes a special "touch" to master that, unfortunately, you will acquire only by the end of your project. Good luck!

 
drizzt's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-16-04, 10:28 AM   #4  
drizzt
LOL, thanks for the info on doing repairs using tape but in my situation I'm just mudding small nicks, scrathes, and small holes. No tape is used. When I use my drywall compound to repair the patch, you can see small bubbles in it and when it dries you see small divots where the air escaped. Could this be from trying to reuse the mud as it get's quite wet from keeping water on top.

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

11-17-04, 05:14 AM   #5  
After reading your second post, I think that the age & consistency of your mud is most likely causing your problem. What you're describing is called pocking, it sand out with 120 grit paper. Good luck!

 
JPicasso's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 322
IL

11-18-04, 12:17 PM   #6  
I would keep much less mud around the house.

I currently have a container the size of a large coffy cup and it's more than enough for the occasional nail hole or scratch. If you do major remodeling, buy a bucket or bag, otherwise, fugehtaboutit.

2nd, quit with the water already. only add a few drops at a time to the small portion you plan on working with in the next few mins. I think you are using the mud waay to watery.

 
Gregg's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-18-04, 05:29 PM   #7  
Gregg
You've probably got too much water in your compound (thus causing the bubbles). Try mixing your compound and don't keep adding water to it. Compound has a relatively short shelf life after it is opened up, so buy only what you need in small quantities. If it is more than several months old, toss it out.

You can also buy it in a dry powder form (in a bag) and mix it yourself. Use USG Easysand 90 or 45 (which is much better for repairwork ) and can be mixed in a small contaier as needed/when needed. There is no shrinkage with the dry compounds and they are better for hole patching and repair work and the easysand product applies and sands easily.

 
Aarno's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-25-04, 03:59 PM   #8  
Aarno
Agree with the others about too much water. That will definitely result in those air pockets which you describe.

The other most common cause of those bubbles is overmixing. Mix until you have the right consistency and then stop. Overmixing seems to drive air in the mix - and that results in those tiny air pockets.

Sometimes sanding will get rid of them, sometimes it'll just uncover more. If they're small enough, the primer and paint will fill them in and level them out.

But the best way to deal with them - is to avoid making them in the first place. But failing that - just cover them once again with the proper mix this time. Sand to finish.

Aarno

 
KenS's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 11

12-05-04, 12:45 PM   #9  
just to complicate things

I have often found that if I let the mud become too dry when I do my second and last coat that I get tiny bubbles about 1/16" in diameter that you don't see until you prime because the dust from sanding has filled them them. If this is what you are experiencing, I think it is because your mud was a little too dry for your skin coat and so couldn't fill these holes.

To correct it, it usually apply another skin (very thin) coat.

Hope I don't "muddy" the situation.

Ken

 
Search this Thread