Drywall - Horizontal or Vertical

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Old 12-09-04, 07:39 AM
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Drywall - Horizontal or Vertical

I am finishing my basement and am about to put up the drywall....Total wall height is 8'8" and i will be installing a suspended ceiling in this room with a drop of about 8 inches to hide ductwork. So my wall height will be about 8'...should I install the drywall vertically so that i only have tapered seams? Or should I do it horizontally and have some butted seams? I realize most books say that the horizontal way will have less joints to tape but in my case one way I will hvae no butt joints and the other way i will have some.

Thanks for any info.

I will also probably be contracting out the taping and mudding.

Thanks
Lou
 
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Old 12-09-04, 08:43 AM
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STOP! You're about to make the mistake I made. If you are going to contract any of it, contract the hanging and the taping. I hung first and then found out they wanted the same (or in some cases more) money to finish it. Folks who do it proffessionally want to do the whole job, and you won't save much if anything by hanging it yourself.

Call the contractors in for a bid BEFORE you hang the rock. Wish I had. As it turned out I decided to finish it myself and it turned out fine.
 
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Old 12-09-04, 10:45 AM
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Could you give me a rough estimate on what it would cost to have it all done ($/sheet or $/ft2)?

I was thinking i was going to try taping and mudding the storage room first...and if it came out allright then I would do the rest myself... I am trying to save as much money as possible. I also would be hiring a friend most likely to tape and mud it so it may be a little cheaper than calling in an unknown person.

Thanks for the warning though. The sheetrock was delivered today but I havent started anything yet. If I end up hanging it myself...do you have any advice on my initial question?

Thanks for your reply!
 
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Old 12-09-04, 10:48 AM
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Kens

Being a taper, and not afraid of butt joints, I would personally never hang drywall vertically throughout a room. However I can see why you would.

If you have the drywall hanging vertically, most of the taping will be either above your head or below your waist. That will mean you will need to be either on a ladder or on your knees for a good portion. If you hang it horizontally, everything, except parts of butt joints will be at a much more comfortable level.

Would 9, 10 or 12 footers help avoid butt joints?

Have fun,

Ken
 
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Old 12-09-04, 11:46 AM
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Seems like it was a per square foot cost and it was the same whether or not they hung it. I'd suggest going the whole way with the storage area--all the way to finish to see how it works for you. I feel like mine worked fine and I saved $2,000 doing it myself (1000 SF floor space 3 rooms plus a bathroom) the 2,000 was just for labor of taping and mudding (or would have been the same to include hanging). I think it was .60 per sf of finish (doesn't match the floor space because wall space varies according to floor plan). But I could be wrong on that per sf price--the over $2000 I remember.

I hung upright for the fewer butt joints, but if you can get longer sheets in you may choose to do the other way for fewer seams overall.
 
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Old 12-09-04, 02:39 PM
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In residential, always hang horizontally. Nothing will line up and you will end up cutting off rolled edges causing 8' long butt joints. Remember to stagger all butt joints.
 
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Old 12-09-04, 02:40 PM
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Well I think I will definitely try to finish it in my storage room first then to see how everything comes out. Then if that doesnt come out very good I will go to my drywall friends to se ehow much they will charge me. Thanks for the rough estimate though...I had no clue what it would cost.

Unfortunately I didnt buy any panels longer than 8'. There are a few walls that could be covered by a longer panel. I think I am going to measure and see if I can locate the butt joints in areas that arent as noticeable or in areas that that will be blocked by hangings or furniture.

If I am do the taping/mudding myself ...do you think I will be able to do a better job if I hang them vertically and have nice tapered edges to work with instead of having to deal with butt joints...or do you think it really doesnt matter? Im just stuck on the fact that most people say not to hang them vertically. So if it really is bad then I wont do it.

Thanks so much for the info its all been helpful.
 
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Old 12-09-04, 02:43 PM
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Coops - That is a great point...I didnt even think about that! That would be a major bummer...... Ok that made my decision for me... I will hang them horizontally!! At least I know I will have one tapered edge always to finish...and I will try to hide the butt joints as best as possible.
 
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Old 12-11-04, 08:14 PM
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Just finished my 250 square foot office. All hung vertical not a butt joint in sight except the ceilings.

Come to think of it in my whole 1400 sf basement I only had two long butt joints--and those were just because of a brain cramp when I was framing.
 
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Old 12-12-04, 07:06 PM
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Not a Pro here, but I have hung quite a bit of drywall on my own rental properties. At first, I stuck to the "hang it horizontally" rule. I later found out that it isn't always that simple. To me, there are a few things to consider before deciding horizontal or vertical.

First of all, there's cost. Drywall is relatively inexpensive, so choosing vertical or horizontal based on waste isn't all that important - UNLESS it's a large project. And if it is large, waste (cost) naturally does figure into the equation.

Horizontal is fine - for reasons already given. As said, stagger butt joints and use the longest board you can handle. And personally, I always hang horizontal with metal studding. The long span 'ties' the metal studs together better - making the wall more sturdy. And obviously, staggered butt joints helps in that respect.

In a case of an 8' ceiling (as in this case), I have no problem hanging them vertically - with certain conditions. First (as mentioned), the studding is not metal. Also, the studs must be in line with each other. If they're not, you run the risk of having a 'crooked' wall every 4'. Boards 8' and over hung horizontally help to cancel this in/out problem a bit. Enough to make hanging horizontally worthwhile - or at least give it serious consideration.

As a point of information - remember that if it's an older home that had plaster walls at one time (obviously not in this case), the framers weren't all that fussy about making sure their studding was perfectly aligned. The reason? They relied on the plasterers to flatten the walls. That's why if you've ever gutted plaster rooms, you'll notice the removed plaster is thicker in some places than it is in other places. Hanging drywall on these gutted walls presents a problem. Not only do you need to build the wall back up, but you have to shim the studs so when you hang the drywall - the finished walls will be flat. The technique I use for shimming walls is basically the same one used when hanging ceilings. String lines and shim.

The length of the walls wasn't mentioned in this question. But I'll assume it's long enough that butt joints can't be avoided. If that's the case (and keeping in mind that I prefer to avoid butt joints if possible), I'd hang the rock vertically - but only after making sure the studding is aligned. And if it wasn't, I'd run some lines and shim them until they were. I'd rather reach up and bend down to fill a tapered joint (as in vertical hanging) rather than mess around with butt joints. However - I emphasize that this is a personal preference.

If there's a point to what's expressed above, it's that the decision to hang horizontally or vertically is made after taking a few things into account. Fortunately, it's not a long drawn out process - and time well spent (imo).

Aarno
 
  #11  
Old 12-14-04, 09:01 AM
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Hor. or Vert. on 9'

Instead of posting a new question I thought I would piggy back off this discussion. Over my Christmas break I am planning on removing paneling from my den and installing drywall. From floor to ceiling is 9'. I was wondering if I can order 10' sections (10x4 or 10x6) from the home improvment stores? if not I'll have that odd seam on every section thus alternate the seam (top then bottom).
If I can handle the 10x6 it would make life easier in the long run after a few

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-15-04, 06:05 PM
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Thanks for the info Aarno, I appreciate it. I think I am going to look at each wall individually and determine the best way to hang it for each wall. I think I may have some problems with framing be a little off so horizontal may be better...but I will definitely analyze each wall as I go.

I have some additional questions about drywall and framing...in one room i have installed a floating ceiling (sound proofing reasons...as the whole room is a room within a room) which consists of 2x10" joists. I have noticed that these joists have shrunk or twisted a bit and i now do not have straight framing. I have one really bad stud that is much lower than the rest (in the middle 50%)...it is off by about 5/8". A couple joists are slightly smaller so they are a little bit higher...maybe by 3/8" to 1/2".

First question...With the joist that is much lower than the rest...how can I "shave off" the 5/8"?? If there is a way to do this then it would be much closer to the rest of the joists. I cant replace the joist as the HVAC ductwork and electrical has been installed and it would be a virtually impossible for me to replace it myself.

Second Question... WIth the shorter joists what is the best way to shim them slightly?? Is it possible to glue a "2 by x" strip to the joist? Can i actually make a 2x0.5" strip? If not, what are the best ways to level off my ceiling for the drywall installation ?

Thanks so much for all your help.

Lou
 
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Old 12-16-04, 10:03 AM
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baileyboo

Look in your local yellow pages for drywall supply places. For a 9' wall what you want to use is called stretch rock. It comes in standard lengths, but instead of being 4' wide, it's 4'-6" wide. so two sheets hung horiizontal will cover the full wall. Cost is only about, a penny & a half more than standard 1/2 board. We hang alot of new homes with this and with proper planning you can do an entire houe with only a handful of butt joints. HTH
 
 

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