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Removing part of an interior wall for walk-thru

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  #1  
Old 12-26-04, 10:19 AM
kirkeric
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Removing part of an interior wall for walk-thru

Can someone give some simple instructions on how to do this? I am simply making a walk-thru between a bedroom and an adjacent smaller room. The hole will be approximately 7 feet wide. Seems the most important question is, "is it load bearing?" My understanding from a different post is a simple way to check is by checking whether the support beams for second floor are parallel of perpendicular to the wall. If parallel, it is not loading bearing?

My plan was to open the wall, relocate some outlets, frame the top and close up the exposed wall. Appreciate anyones help and it would be preferred to get a response by email so I don't have to keep checking back here.

Thanks,
Eric
 

Last edited by kirkeric; 12-28-04 at 06:00 AM.
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  #2  
Old 12-26-04, 10:32 AM
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My understanding from a different post is a simple way to check is by checking whether the support beams for second floor are parallel of perpendicular to the wall. If parallel, it is not loading bearing?
That's pretty good basic advice, but I have to recommend the before you attempt to tackle this project yourself that you have a competent contractor or engineer take a look at your specific situation. Call two or three local contractors to get estimates on your project, if they're worth their salt they wil at least take a look and determine whether the wall is load-bearing or not before giving a bid. Also you might find that it's worth it to have it hired out. Just my $.02 worth. Good luck & happy holidays! :glocke:
 
  #3  
Old 12-26-04, 10:43 AM
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Thanks. I already started cutting into the drywall (not the studs) to see what I am in for. I am pretty crafty so I believe I can do the task. But let me ask you this, If I go ahead and frame it as IF it were load bearing, shouldn't that be pretty safe? I should only be removing at most 3-4 studs.

Appreciate your advice.

FYI - This is an old rancher, built in 58. The upstairs has been modified by someone else years ago so that it has two window jutting outward on front and back so someone had already modified the home. It has two huge bedrooms upstairs with only partially slanting ceilings.

Thanks

Eric
 
  #4  
Old 12-26-04, 11:16 AM
kirkeric
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awesomedell

I was going to attach a couple images of the blue prints but doesn't look like I can. I think that would help.
Is there a way to get that to you?

PS: Sorry about the email thing, was not aware of that.

Eric
 
  #5  
Old 12-27-04, 08:15 AM
kirkeric
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Hello again,

I had hoped for some more advice out there. Any comments on my additional information from last posts?

Thanks,
Eric
 
  #6  
Old 12-27-04, 08:55 AM
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Since your going to do this, you hit it on the head-treat the opening as if it IS a load bearing wall, that way your covered even if it's not needed, it'll be peice of mind.

To start with, brace ceilings on both sides of the wall your going to be working on. If the finished opening is going to be 7', I'd cut get some 2x4's 10' long to set on the floor/ceiling and fill in temporary studs 24"o.c. Leave them back enough so you have adequate working room for removing the plaster/drywall and framing/installing the new header. Since patch work is the easy part make the opening a foot or two wider than the proposed opening-meaning remove the drywall a foot or two past your proposed opening so if you have to deal with re routing electrical you can easily do this and not fight space issues.

Once you know where you know where you'd like the opening to start, measure to the left/right 1 1/2" to install a stud running from the bottom plate to the top plate, then figure out how high you want the opening to be. Measure up from the bottom plate and cut a 2x4/6 (whatever the current wall has for framing) so the top of the 2x is to the mark you made. The header will sit on top of that 2x. Then measure over the width you want the opening and do it again for the other side. once that is done you can cut out the bottom plate in between your wall framing in the opening. Get a couple 2x12's or 2 11 1/4" LVL's and measure the distance so it fits tight between the 2 studs running from the bottom plate to the top plate and so it sits on top of the jacks. Fur out between the 2x12's with 1/2" OSB if your wall framing is 2x4's otherwise you'll have to cut nominal lumber for spacers. If using LVL's nailing them together will produce the proper width for 2x4 wall framing and no spacers needed. You want the face on both sides of the header to be flush with the wall framing, that way when installing the sheetrock your wall will be flush again.

Lift and set the header on top of the jacks, make sure the header is fully seated on top of them, nail through the sides of the king studs into the ends of the header to hold it in place. Then cut 2x fillers/cripples to place between the top of the header and bottom of top plate spaced 16" o.c. Once all your framing/electrical is addressed commense with the drywall and finish wish work.

Hope that's the info you're looking for. Keeping with the rules you should contact your local building dept. and obtain a permit for this type of work to ensure the work your performed is upto code for your own safety and house integrity in the future.
 
  #7  
Old 12-27-04, 10:19 AM
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IHI,

Hey, this is a great run down and I believe gives me a good mental picture, plus I am familiar already with how the header goes into place from previous research. I do have a couple follow ups. First, I will follow your advice on the building permit, don't want to screw the pooch on this job

I intend to use 2x12's for the header and just make the opening that high. Since there is some minor wiring moves required, I may have to go from ceiling down through the header, then leave a space and put another cross stud just to run the wire off to the right side.

So my questions.

1. Since this is a small job making screws not to costly, is there any problem with me using screws to put the the header together as well as inserting the new studs, etc? With proper countersinking, wont that be stronger anyway?

2. I have a couple outlets to move. First, a phone jack (easy one), and on either side of the wall is an AC outlet. Fortunately, the side I want to push over to is the "slack" side so I can easily move it. Also, given the older style wiring, I think I will just eliminate one outlet to save the the load on the circuit. My question though is this; from this outlet, it also goes upstairs and with the move, I think it is going to cause me to insert an extension of wire to fill the gap. Is there anything unsound about this, providing I use similar wiring and proper connectors?

3. Finally, this is probably the easiest one for you, since you said the patchwork is easiest. I make the hole wider, got it...but when it comes to patching the hole back up, I will obviously have new studs in place for the walkthru, is there a way to cut the sheetrock on the opposite side so that I have that opposite stud there when I go to replace the sheetrock? Or do you just recommend inserting another stud at the edge of the outermost opening to give 2 studs to nail the patch piece to? Hope that made sense.

Thanks again.

Eric
 
  #8  
Old 12-27-04, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by kirkeric
IHI,

Hey, this is a great run down and I believe gives me a good mental picture, plus I am familiar already with how the header goes into place from previous research. I do have a couple follow ups. First, I will follow your advice on the building permit, don't want to screw the pooch on this job

I intend to use 2x12's for the header and just make the opening that high. Since there is some minor wiring moves required, I may have to go from ceiling down through the header, then leave a space and put another cross stud just to run the wire off to the right side.

So my questions.

1. Since this is a small job making screws not to costly, is there any problem with me using screws to put the the header together as well as inserting the new studs, etc? With proper countersinking, wont that be stronger anyway?

2. I have a couple outlets to move. First, a phone jack (easy one), and on either side of the wall is an AC outlet. Fortunately, the side I want to push over to is the "slack" side so I can easily move it. Also, given the older style wiring, I think I will just eliminate one outlet to save the the load on the circuit. My question though is this; from this outlet, it also goes upstairs and with the move, I think it is going to cause me to insert an extension of wire to fill the gap. Is there anything unsound about this, providing I use similar wiring and proper connectors?

3. Finally, this is probably the easiest one for you, since you said the patchwork is easiest. I make the hole wider, got it...but when it comes to patching the hole back up, I will obviously have new studs in place for the walkthru, is there a way to cut the sheetrock on the opposite side so that I have that opposite stud there when I go to replace the sheetrock? Or do you just recommend inserting another stud at the edge of the outermost opening to give 2 studs to nail the patch piece to? Hope that made sense.

Thanks again.

Eric
1. Use 16d nails, not screws. Code here does not allow screws for this type of application and reason being is strength. Screws are brittle and will snap when taxed and you lose all mechanical intergity this way. Nails will just bend. While this project is not a "big deal" for those of us that do it and have the tools, it might be worth renting/borrowing a framing nailer for your rough frame in. Here when building a header code requires that the nails be spaced no more than 16" o.c. across the width of the header front and back. They do let us get by using 3 16d nails every 16". You will get better strength nailing at a slight angle and not striaght down into the wood. But, use nails and forgo the screws, at most use the screws to tack lumber into place then nails.

2. I am not a licsenced electrican, but can maybe point you in a better way than no info at all and hopefully somebody could add to this that has better knowledge. Most code require that outlets be spaced every 6' so cords can reach and outlet of some sort without extension cords being used, namely lamps, or appliances, etc...so I dont know if omitting the outlet will be the best choice as opposed to just relocating it which is so easy with remodler boxes. As far as extending the wire it sounds as if the upstairs outlet gets juice from the outlet your proposing of omitting. In that case, you should pull the "live" wire back into the basement and run it into a junction box, from that junction box run your new wire upto the outlet located upstairs so it's one continuious wire and not a double spliced thing. Regardless, once I was old enought to know better(got licesenced myself), I started to use licsenced electricians, alot of the smaller guys with their own business are VERY reasonable and can work around your schedule also, so if you know "this day" you'll be ready for them they can usually re-arrange their schedule to stop in and fix it, especailly since your does'nt sound like a big deal. This is a big liablity issue and you hate to "maybe" do somthing right and have problems in the future or after the wall is covered back up

3. I'm trying to picture in my head what your saying. Maybe too much sugar laidened goodies from the holidays are hampering my vision What you could do to save work-and what I'd do-is perform all the work from one side of the wall and leave the opposite side of the wall drywall intact. Once all of your framing is done, you can use your sawsall to cut out the drywall from the opening so the other side of the wall is cut perfect to the opening you just built, then it's just a matter of installing the drywall/finish wood out choice around the jamb area of the opening and finish as needed.

Sorry I could'nt picture what your were trying to say in the 3rd question, but I'm still reeling from this sugar buzz
 
  #9  
Old 12-27-04, 11:57 AM
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IHI,

Hey, thanks again. Sounds like an electrician might be a good idea for that part. Any idea on an estimate? Any guesstimate would help - have no idea if I should expect $50 or $250 or higher. I know that will be tough but any input would be appreciated.

It certainly does look like the upstairs is sucking off that outlet, might explain why it takes very little to blow the fuse. I went all flourescent upstairs just to be able to run a plug in heater along with all of daugters lights, PCs, stereo, etc. Running a new wire sounds like that would be better, although from looking upstairs, looks like it also makes one turn too (just to complicate matters).

Let me try to better explain the 3rd question. How do I reattach the sheetrock to the area in which there is no stud readily available? Maybe that will clear it up. No matter how much wall I tear down, I will always be removing wall between studs so my question was how to attach it. There will obviously be a stud at the frame of the new entry but the side going into the wall, may overlap a stud then remain hanging free. Does that help?

Who do I contact when it comes to building permits?

Thanks,

Eric
 
  #10  
Old 12-27-04, 12:26 PM
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Not to sound like a prud or sumthing but I dont want to give estimates of what to expect on the electrician. It's going to boil down to what materials he's going to need and duration he thinks it will take to do this. I hate to throw a number out since subconciously it'll be in your head about what to expect and it could be waay cheaper or waay more expensive. Either way it'll be the right choice hiring that part out and I dont think it'll be over the high price you mentioned above, but it all depends on what's needed.

I think I understand now, glasses of water to flush the sugar from the system Try to locate a stud before you make your first cut into the drywall. You can either make your cut in the drywall in the middle of the stud, or just cut on the 1 side of the stud so after you cut the drywall the edge will be flush with the studs edge and then nail another 2x4 to that before you go to hang the rock back up so you have a clean stud to screw the rock edge to. Simple enough now that I "see" what your saying"

Most all permits can be obtained from the towns city hall-building department. If not, they will tell you where to go, so you could call there first to check.
 
  #11  
Old 12-27-04, 12:38 PM
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IHI,

Ok, thanks. Glad that explanation worked better. I figure adding the additional stud is the way to go, seems like it would be harder to try and cut directly down the center of a stud.

One final question and I will be out of your hair today. You mentioned earlier about getting some studs to help brace the ceiling during the teardown and installation of the header. Just trying to picture that.....easy enough, until I actually go to insert the header and have a stud in the way Will it be safe enough to pull those just as I am about to insert the header?

Thanks again.

Eric
 
  #12  
Old 12-27-04, 12:47 PM
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"technically" speaking, you should leave the bracing in place until the header is installed and the cripples are in place. This way when you remove the bracing it will transfer the load back onto the header, instead of a 7' wide void. Even if you have the temporary walls in place within 3 or 4' of where your working it'll be better than nothing at all.

Could this be done without bracing anything, I'm sure it could as I've seen some crazy things over the yrs., but since I'm in somebody elses home I dont need to give them a reason to talk me out of money if the plaster above cracks, or someother side effect from not taking precautionary steps. You know the whole "politically correct" type situation
 
  #13  
Old 12-27-04, 12:53 PM
kirkeric
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IHI,

Thanks. I thought that would be my last one...but what are cripples? Are those the short studs that I will lay the header on?

Still trying to see just how I can keep the brace studs in place when trying to install the header. I suppose that means not doing your earlier good idea of leaving the opposite wall intact? I CAN see having a stud slightly off center while sliding the header in if the opposite wall is opened up.

Although, I understand your politically correct answer...I somehow think in the moments it takes to drop those support studs and pop in that header, the ceiling is not likely about to drop

I suppose that last support stud could be in there sideways though and once the header is part way in place, I can shimmy that one out?

Eric
 
  #14  
Old 12-27-04, 01:22 PM
kirkeric
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Originally Posted by IHI
"technically" speaking, you should leave the bracing in place until the header is installed and the cripples are in place. This way when you remove the bracing it will transfer the load back onto the header, instead of a 7' wide void. Even if you have the temporary walls in place within 3 or 4' of where your working it'll be better than nothing at all.

Could this be done without bracing anything, I'm sure it could as I've seen some crazy things over the yrs., but since I'm in somebody elses home I dont need to give them a reason to talk me out of money if the plaster above cracks, or someother side effect from not taking precautionary steps. You know the whole "politically correct" type situation
IHI,

FYI - Just called the building inspectors on permits, etc and he told me he had no problem with me doing what i was doing and agreed that if I treat it as load bearing, can't go wrong. He said, "just be careful". Ha...great advice eh?

Look forward to any additional info from previous post.

Eric
 
  #15  
Old 12-27-04, 04:19 PM
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Good advise, LOL, kinda like "break a leg"

The temporary walls/bracing I'm talking about are just that. Imagine building temporary walls that run parallel on both sides of the wall your going to work on. They're just there to shoulder the load on either side of the wall being worked on so there's no chance of the above weight of the floor and how that's designed to be passed down to the footings throughout framing- sagging and causing havoc with cracks in the drywall on the above floor AND you not having to worry about jacking up that section in order to install the header and cripples. From experience, I have seen a sag of 2" in a 6' span when bracing was not utilized to support the load overhead. That was cutting in a patio door, the home had a 4' overhang and they had just reiceved 11" of snow the night before. I look back and hate to admit that kind of mistake, but when your young and full of spunk you dont think about hte little stuff, and I'm sure everyone of us "pro's" has done something stupid at least one time or another as it's only human. That was years ago and after seeing that concreted why bracing is indeed so important. Luckily it was an outside wall and the kitchen was gutted for a remodel otherwise it could've got ugly.

King Studs: are the studs that go from btm plate to top plate on either side of the jack studs for an opening.

"Jacks" or jack studs are the actual studs of an opening that supports the header...or maybe I should say the headers sits on top of the jacks.

Cripples- are the little filler studs that sit on top of the header and nail to the top plate. These are needed to distribute the weight of the above load over a broad area.

So with that I also bid..."Good luck"
 
  #16  
Old 12-28-04, 03:43 AM
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IHI,

Morning. So, in reading this, are you saying that I must use cripples? I had planned on having the header (2x12s) just meet with the ceiling 2x4. It almost sounds like you are saying that the weight will not be distributed over the header unless cripples are used.

I am a little unclear on how to get that header in with all of these studs in the way. I wish we could view some visuals on this site. Here is what I see. I am removing 5 studs. Where those studs are removed, I sequentially add a temp in while removing the old one, and go down the line. I tack these lightly just to hold them in place. Meanwhile, on either side of the opening, I double or triple up on the existing studs to give me the shelf I need for the header. I build the header to fit snug on top of that shelf, meeting the top 2x4 from the existing framing of that wall (the one that attaches to ceiling).

Now, when I am ready to insert the header, this is where I don't have the visual. I need to get those studs out of the way to insert the header. MY plan was to get those temp studs loose, slightly off center enough to get the header nudged in. As I scoot the header in, the studs slide out the opposite side.

Will that work?

Also, I see a lot of references to a top plate and bottom plate. Should I presume you are meaning the top 2x4 of these existing wall?

Thanks,

Eric
 
  #17  
Old 12-28-04, 04:40 AM
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You can install the header directly against the top plate so you dont have to install cripples.

The temporary bracing does not go in the opening at all, it goes on on both sides of the wall your working on.

----------
lllllllllllllllllllllll Imagine looking down from the sky into your home
----------

The llllll is the wall in your house your going to make the new opening, the --- are temporary walls to support the load overhead. So the bracing is temporary walls that runs parallel to the what your working on.
 
  #18  
Old 12-28-04, 05:17 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

Well **&^%&*! I guess I was not thinking that I could place the temp walls on either side of the wall. I somehow thought that they had to remain directly over the space being removed. Duh. Easy enough so I just place them between the floor and ceiling to each side then.

I swear this will be last question. My comment on the "plates"...that is just a reference to the floor and ceiling where the current wall stands, correct?

Also, as I go in the basement and analyze the beams, it would seem that this is definitely a load bearing wall since the wall in question sits directly above a concrete/brick wall spanning from front to back of house with a couple healthy joists going perpendicular. I would presume that is transferred upward to top floor as well.

Eric
 
  #19  
Old 12-28-04, 05:34 AM
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I'll try another icon picture

________________ Top plate
l l l l l l l l Studs
________________ Bottom plate

Top/bottom plate are the perpendicular boards that the studs are nailed in between. the bottom plate gets attached to the subfloor when being placed and the top plate will ultimately get doubled up when doing wall construction and the rafters/trusses set on top of that-but dont worry about that!!

It does sound as if that wall is load bearing if it does have a beam directly under the wall your going to work on, so now I'll really try to push for your to use that temporary wall bracing. for the above floor until your get your new rough framing taken care of. It's a little more time and a little more material, but nothing I'd even consider to even be a minor inconvenience. Maybe $25-30 more in material(u dont need premium lumber) and 20 minutes of time before the actual "wall gut" project begins. Alot better than saving the $25 and 20 minutes and having to do crack repair above.
 
  #20  
Old 12-28-04, 05:58 AM
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IHI,

That was what I thought, that the "plate" term simply meant the upper and lower beams of the wall. I just didn't want to go looking for some steel plate or something

I will follow your advice and appreciate all of the great input. I also appreciate the speed in which you reply and hope you didnt do a lot of this --> while you read my numerous replies.

I will be tackling this project over the next couple weeks as I first tear out the sheet rock (the rest) and look more into the two electrical lines. I am thinking I might be able to thread the new line up to the second floor as well as the re-running of the current one, taking them both down into the basement. I figure if I am IN the wall, may as well upgrade the wiring. The house appears to be about 90% new and a few strands of that older cloth covered stuff.

Thanks,

Eric
 
  #21  
Old 12-29-04, 11:22 AM
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For IHI

IHI,

Hope all is well. Interesting development. If you recall our discussion above regarding this AC outlet and how it "appeared" that the upstairs was feeding off the downstairs. After removing more of the wall, it actually appears the reverse is true and the wiring comes FROM upstairs, feeds to AC outlets and takes a U-turn back upstairs.

Is this odd?

With that in mind, I think I will proceed as I mentioned by removing one of the outlets in the process.

Comments?

Thanks,

Eric
 
  #22  
Old 12-29-04, 03:46 PM
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LOL, literally anything is possible with those older houses. I got to walk through a house to check it out for a buddy that wanted to buy it as a rental, doubled up 2x4's for floor joists 24" o.c. spanning 11' from the center beam to the outside basement walls. I really got cued in when I stepped up from the landing and got to the center of the room and it felt like a trampoline.

Might be worth the investment to get a current checker so you can see which leg of the circuit is hot and then figure out from there how they got it ran.

Other than that sounds like everything else should go as planned.
 
  #23  
Old 12-30-04, 04:30 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

Thanks. Surprisingly, and to MY benefit, there has been a lot of very high quality looking work done to the house, lots of rewiring already done (I estimate the house about 90% rewired - 200AMP?). I did notice a jack under the kitchen though and not quite sure why it is there since it appears to bow up slighly in the kitchen like it was an unnecessary uplift. Based on previously threads, sounds like a dangerous subject, though I think I will incrementally lower it. Since it sits on the lower foundation (so to speak) of the fireplace, I can actually tell that it has been lifted by 1/4 to 1/2 inch.

Back to the wall, I also noticed that the walls are amazingly thick. It looks like they doubled up on sheetrock. It appears there is a 1/4 inch sheet attached directly to studs, with another 1/2 inch piece on top of that and then, roughly 1/32-1/16 of plaster.

I have not yet researched the various thicknesses on sheets (though I know you know this off the top of your head) so I am guessing I can probably get a 3/4 inch sheet or do exactly what they did by doubling up and filling anything else with "mud" - as they say?

With a little 2 yr old running around and work, I have been taking it slow, but tomorrow, I think I will get down into the good stuff. Going to get the studs and 2x12s tomorrow.

Question, I have the info on the nails from previous, but what size sheetrock screws do you recommend?

I was thinking 1 1/2 inch?

Thanks,

Eric
 
  #24  
Old 12-30-04, 04:39 AM
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If you have to build out the wall so it gets flush with the old wall, you can either fur out the 2x's then install 1 layer of 1/2" rock, or just like you said, buy 1/4" and 1/2" then install them stacked on top of each other.

You can use 1 1/2" screws for the first layer of sheetrock, but you might use a 2" screw when you start to double them up. It'll make hitting/finding the stud alot easier when you start getting the wall that thick.
 
  #25  
Old 12-30-04, 04:41 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

By fur, you mean? I am guessing a spacer to bring the stud out? Is there a special material for that?

By your response, should I assume there is no such thing as a 3/4 inch sheet? No problem if not, would probably be pretty darn heavy on top of my SUV.

Thanks,

Eric
 
  #26  
Old 12-30-04, 04:51 AM
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If you have access to a table saw you could rip down some 2x's to make up the distance from the face of the studs in the wall to bring it within 1/2" of the old plaster so when you install the new 1/2" drywall it'll be flush.

Either way it's going to be a little time consuming, so it boils down to "pick your poisen"

5/8" is about as thick as it comes. There might be a thicker board available I'm not aware of, but typically sheetrock is just stacked to get the desired thickness needed.
 
  #27  
Old 12-30-04, 05:07 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

Well, my workshop is coming along nicely, but don't have a table saw yet.

I will stack them. I suppose if I can travel the sands of Iraq, I can carry in an extra sheet of sheetrock. It almost looks like the 1/4 and 5/8 would come right out to the edge of that plaster. Otherwise, the previous with a coat of the mud - should that work? I have heard it called mud but it is a bucket of filler stuff for tidying up wall work. Does that sound like the right stuff?

Eric
 
  #28  
Old 12-30-04, 09:06 AM
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LOL, yeah, it's commonly called mud. Joint compound is the term used by the companies making it.

Your better of having the patched in section just a tad lower than the already finished wall that you'll need to blend into, this way you can focus on one side of the wall from the joint over and it'll make it alot easier IMO when you start blending. Otherwise you have to deather out to the left and right side of the joint and it'll be kinda far out on the already finished wall so when it's sanded and textured yoou'll never know you did anything.

IMO the best stuff to use is the hot mud, it comes powder form in a bag that you have to mix yourself and has set up times from 5 minutes to 210 minutes. DO NOT mix with hot or even warm water, that will accelerate the setting time by 2 or 3 so if your have 5 minute mud it'll set up before your even done mixing-I know and it'd hard to clean up once that happens.

For what your doing if this is your first time drywalling, a bag of 90 minute mud will be alright since it will give your plenty of time to spread it, but not take over night to dry. I like this stuff because it sands really easy and does not shrink like the joint compounds that come pre mixed in buckets-this is great since sometimes you have no choice but to put the mud on real thick in certain cases. The stuff in buckets will tend to shrink and crack when applies thick and gets real uneven so you have to kncok down the surface before you can even apply the next coat. When it comes to final coat I'll usually opt to use the bucket stuff (lightweight joint compound) so I dont need to make a mess mixing up a batch but that's totally upto you.

If this keeps up I might just have to come over and do it for you
 
  #29  
Old 12-30-04, 09:53 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

Thanks. I like to totally research my project so I see it through from start to finish - apologies if I asked too many questions

I am sure you can respect that

Eric
 
  #30  
Old 12-30-04, 10:12 AM
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I'm the same way with my race car, ask a ton of questions so you can ward off anything unexepected when you start to do something or try something different.
 
  #31  
Old 01-01-05, 05:54 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

A quick question.

My jack studs will join against the stud on either side of the opening.

Should I cut the bottom plate at the end of those existing studs with the jack studs directly on the floor or set the jack studs on the plate and cut it at the edge of them?

Thanks,

Eric

Happy New Year!
 
  #32  
Old 01-01-05, 06:54 AM
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All the studs and jack studs need to sit on top of the bottom plate.

Happy New Year to you and yours.
 
  #33  
Old 01-01-05, 07:18 AM
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IHI,

Roger, got it. About to install them now. Temp walls are up, going to install jack studs before pulling the other 4 studs (pulled 1) and get header ready so there is as little time as possible without the full support.

Thanks!

Eric
 
  #34  
Old 01-04-05, 01:43 PM
kirkeric
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IHI,

Hello. Just thought I would provide some feedback on how this went. It was a far more extensive bit of work than met the eye, though that is common and I made it happen. I ended up removing 5 studs, relocating an AC socket, removing one AC socket (as I mentioned I would), and removing an unnessary phone jack. In order to relocate the AC, had to pull all wiring back up to attic, do some minor rewiring, lenthening, and driving a new hole down one stud off to side of new opening. That was a task because the location was very near the outer wall, making the drilling very tight with the angle of the roof coming down. I went down, rather than up because it saved me from tearing out unnessary drywall, this way I could feed the wires down and fish them out of the new hole for the outlet.

I made a temp wall on just one side with 4 studs and didn't knock down the 5 until the jack studs were in place, the header was built and all was ready, then I pulled the 5, bent the nails back and forth for the upper plate until they broke off (since they were driven downward into studs) and with only minor mods, I got the header in place quite snugly. I used 2x12x2s, two together and it is very sturdy.

I then cut off the bottom plate at the edge of each jack stud (that was fun, could not get saw in well, so had to use a wood chisel to cut through both sides). Now it is read for finishing the appearance of the wall (using previously posted info from you) and place a nice piece of wood over the little threshold where the bottom plate was removed. It is carpet in one room, hardwood in the other and has a nice lip on either side to slide in a piece of fine wood with a couple of routed grooves quite nicely.

I did notice between the subfloor and the hardwood is some sort of tar paper looking stuff. Is that what it is? I need a strip of that about 7 inches by 7 feet to lay in the trough before covering. What is that material?

I appreciate all your help. It would be nice to be able to post some snapshots through the course of these discussions to better show work and work completed. Any ideas?

I tried the webshots...it is riddled with extra stuff...spyware, etc.

Eric
 
  #35  
Old 01-04-05, 03:21 PM
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First off, good job! Glad everything "kinda" went according to plan-projects like that rarely follow a 1,2,3 order since stuff always pops up like you found out. I think it goes without saying you need to get a sawzall (reciprocating saw) would've been handy with this project for cutting off the old nails driven through the top plate holding the old studs off and cutting the bottom plate out....I've had my trusty ole 6amp Dewalt for 9yrs and it's still strong as ever and gets used ALOT for all types of different projects from construction to working on our race cars

They used to install tar paper over the 1x or plywood sheathing before they install the hardwood. Just normal 15lb felt is all it is.

For picture hosting I use: http://www.villagephotos.com/ I use it for hosting pictures for my website so I had to pay for the large hosting of pictures, but I think they will host 10 or 20 for free and it even gives you a quick tag to copy your URL for posting.

Looking forward to seeing how you came out. Have to be careful though, now the wifey will be able to broaden her "honey-do" list.
 
  #36  
Old 01-05-05, 05:48 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

That website works great. The link is below. I have included 6 pictures.

I also included a picture of the blueprint. Early in the discussion that was in hopes of determining if in fact it was a load bearing wall...which it was. Note top right corner room, left wall with the highlighted black box showing what was cut out.

All pictures were taken with my cell phone, so low quality but good enough to see what I have done.

I also included one from outside (just tossed that in). Looking at that picture, the furthest end of the home with the window cover thing would be the room in question. Also just gives you a visual of what I have.

http://www.villagephotos.com/pubbrow...der_id=1167753

Eric
 

Last edited by kirkeric; 01-05-05 at 07:04 AM.
  #37  
Old 01-05-05, 07:21 AM
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Man is that ever an old print LOL! Everything looks really good thus far, obviouosly you have a clue Sure makes that space look alot bigger, and you almost cant tell anything was done looking from the nedroom into the living room. Have to post some pics once you get'er all said and done.

Had to stop home for a breakfast break, been out plowing since 2am and way this storm is looking I'll be at it till thursday afternoon Oh well, knee is shot already but seeing that white money fall from the sky keeps me goin
 
  #38  
Old 01-05-05, 09:39 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

I finally realize that IHI has nothing to do with your name. lol The blueprint you saw does look old and I believe it is one of the originals. I have no idea what they look like today. As soon as I saw the layout of these two bedrooms (the smaller one classifies as a bedroom, though it is only about 9 1/2 ft square) I had the vision of joining them.

I appreciate the compliments on the job. It sounds like you also have a farm?

I will certainly post updated photos as I continue the work.

FYI - If you go to this link (below), you will see another home project I built. Perhaps I have a knack for this stuff

Eric

http://www.villagephotos.com/pubbrow...der_id=1167940
 

Last edited by kirkeric; 01-05-05 at 11:59 AM.
  #39  
Old 01-07-05, 07:01 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

Did you get last post?

Eric
 
  #40  
Old 01-21-05, 05:13 AM
kirkeric
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IHI,

I have not checked this for a few days. It appeared you stopped visiting. So, the progress so far (will post some pictures this weekend). I used the 90 minute self mixing mud and got the big gaps, then bought a 5 gallon bucket of premix to continue. Most of the finish is done but need to give it one sand and a final surface coat. I look forward to your comments once I post the pictures.

Eric
 
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