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Drywall a ceiling or wall first


Rockyroad's Avatar
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12-29-04, 10:33 AM   #1  
Drywall a ceiling or wall first

I have a situation where the walls of a partially finished basement are completly drywalled. The ceiling is unfinished and open to the joists. I want to drywall the ceiling and finish the basement. I have read that when hanging drywall you should start by hanging the drywall from the ceiling first. Is there a structural reason or an advantage of some sort that you must drywall the ceiling first? Thanks

 
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12-29-04, 10:50 AM   #2  
Rockyroad, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
While I am not an expert in this field I have done my share of drywalling. My reason for hanging the ceiling drywall first is to give it support all the way around the room. This way, I do not put a strain on my taping or the edges of the drywall. The ceiling rests on the wallboard.
Experts in this field may have more ideas and reasons so revisit this post for more info. Good luck on your project.

 
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12-29-04, 10:52 AM   #3  
Yes do the ceiling first---- When you put up the ceiling first the drywall on side walls all around helps hold up the edge of the ceiling for you.

ED

 
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12-30-04, 07:31 AM   #4  
Like the others have said, you should hang the ceiling first. But since the walls are already hung you can get away with hanging it last. be sure that it is screwed off really well and pre fill any gaps you have with quick set mud before you tape.

 
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01-12-05, 03:15 PM   #5  
Posted By: coops28 Like the others have said, you should hang the ceiling first. But since the walls are already hung you can get away with hanging it last. be sure that it is screwed off really well and pre fill any gaps you have with quick set mud before you tape.
What is quick set mud verses joint compound?

 
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01-13-05, 05:50 AM   #6  
Quickset comes in powdered form in a bag, it's rated by the amount of time it takes to set up once mixed with water, you can buy it in anything from 15 min to 90 min, for a diyer I wouldn't recommend using anything less than a 90 min product. It's important that you add water to your mix in very small amounts, so you don't end up with a runny mix and don't try to mix up too large of a batch or it will set up in the bucket before you can get it on the wall.

Joint compound comes in three different varieties and is sold in boxes or buckets. The three types are All-purpose, Light, and Topping Compound. All of these are sold as pre-mixed, but all should be thinned with water before using. All-purpose is usually used by most for taping, light compound is used for fill and skim coats over the tape. Topping mix is used for skim coats and for applying texture. Hope that answers your question, post back if you still have questions.

 
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01-13-05, 06:16 AM   #7  
The reason for quick set is that is sets up really hard so it will minimize any cracking that may occur.

 
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01-18-05, 06:29 AM   #8  
my 2 cents

I would do ceiling first but don't use nails (screws) 6 inches from wall around perimeter of ceiling the wall board will hold up ceiling at perimeter that will help prevent cracks later on at the joint where ceiling meets wall. Plus when you install wall one piece will over lap the edge of the other edge in the corners the piece that gets over lapped or butted up against that piece will be held by the other piece pressing against it so don't put in drywall screws in the held piece in the corner it allows for it to expand and prevent cracks to that corner in the future. At doors I like to use a single piece vertical and cut out for door once hung I hang this piece first in a room. I don't like to have joints over my doors they seem to crack easy when a door gets slammed. I don't mind so much over windows as I haven't had problems with them as much.If I build using metal studs I still use wood around door framing it isn't as flexible and tends not to crack as bad around doors with wood.I like to use long sheets of drywall on ceiling it's purpose is for covering not stiffening a wall so I use full sheets not half sheets and full sheets offest like for walls. The longer the better 16 foot sheets make fast work of ceilings. A hint for electric outlets and switches get a rotozip and get the inserts with nails for your electric boxes it makes it so much easier to cut out your openings. All you do is press wall board against that nail and it pokes hole in wall board then you take roto zip insert in that hole and make big cross go outside of boxes and just trace shape of box on drywall it takes a few times but god it beats the old way of measuring. Check out Bob villa he shows how to do it on tv or you can look on internet to find pictures showing how to do it. I created a similar way using wood years ago I'm lazy and always looking for a better way of doing things.

 
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01-19-05, 08:41 PM   #9  
Aarno
Quote:"What is quick set mud verses joint compound?"

In addition to what's already been said, joint compound (mud) is typically pre-mix. It hardens by losing moisture. It 'dries', so to speak. It's relatively easy to work with but the downside is that it takes a longer time to dry. Not good when you want to get the project done in a hurry.

The setting type compounds (hot mud) do not dry out in the literal sense. They harden by chemical reaction. As mentioned, they can set up real fast. And if the mix starts to harden in your tub, you cannot add water to soften the mix. It won't work. The best thing about of setting type compounds is how little time they need to set up. You don't have to wait a day (or whatever) to lay your second coat on. Or a third. The downside of hot muds is that if you don't work fast enough, you'll end up tossing the rest of your batch out.

I almost always use a setting type compound when mudding and taping the joints. Just a personal preference.

Aarno

 
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