screws vs. nails on hanging drywall


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Old 02-07-05, 07:57 AM
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Hanging drywall - screws vs. nails

I've framed my basement, done all the electric, plumbing, and insulation. Now when it comes to drywall, I'm ready to pay someone because I know I will never get to look as good as someone who does it everyday. The one contractor I called in says he uses nails and when I asked him if he'd use screws, he sounded a little indignant about it. I know he's an old timer and I know he does good work but should I be worried about him using nails, especially on the ceiling? I would just think screws are the way to go. I'm also going to ask him to use adhesive, I would think that would be pretty standard today but he said he only used it if it's requested. Any thoughts?
 

Last edited by riverwade; 02-07-05 at 11:27 AM.
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Old 02-07-05, 03:40 PM
chopper33
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I have posted a similar thread just a couple of days ago on using screws opposed to gluing and using a minimum amount of screws. I have always been a firm believer in screws and have never tried glue but I am going to to try gluing the drywall and using a minimum amount of screws in my new basement. It makes sense in using glue to cut down on the amount of screw holes that need to be mudded otherwise. On your question, I would think that screws would be less likely to pop than nails. Good Luck :mask:
 
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Old 02-08-05, 07:57 AM
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I'm with chopper. Adhesive is great for drywall, especially if the framing is a little off (which it always is, when wood). As far as nails vs screws, if it is a big deal for the guy to use nails - make sure they are ring shank ones. 25 % more holding power than smooth shank nails, which always pop sooner or later.
 
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Old 02-08-05, 08:45 AM
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riverwade,

Your old timer probably does do good work, but he is insisting on using only nails, make sure he uses ring shank nails and double nails. This is the way I learned the trade back in the 70's. But honestly it's been the industry standard to glue & screw for at least 20 yrs. Only place we use nails is to tack a top wall sheet up, temporarily until we get it screwed off & we cap the nails with a screw as well. Glue is used everywhere except on exterior walls where a poly barrier is applied over the studs. On ceilings we still screw off sheets with 5 screws per joist, one in each recess and 3 spaced evenly in the field. On glued walls one screw in each recess, and one screw centered in the field. If I were you I'd look for some other bids for your project.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 05:37 AM
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Thanks for the great info guys. Chopper, I don't know how I missed your previous thread a couple days ago.?? Thx again!
 
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Old 02-09-05, 11:50 AM
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just an FYI

I hung the drywall in my basement myself. I used nails ONLY to hold up the drywall while I got the screw gun to screw it down. It seems Like I can see the head of every freaking nail I used! I see NO screws just the nails. So if he wanted to do only nails I would be worried too.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 04:20 PM
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The old timers are like nail driving machines, and they don't buckle the board from beating it up with the hatchet either, but there better methods in use now.
 
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Old 02-09-05, 04:26 PM
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I have never used glue for hanging drywall, never even gave it a thought. what kinda glue are ya talking about? Like an adhesive, like liquid nails? do you put it on with a caulking gun? I mean if you put all those screws in correctly, why would you need glue?????
 
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Old 02-09-05, 04:48 PM
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Gluing the drywall decreases the number of screws you will have to mud over and they say it actually is stronger than screws. I researched this last weekend and at Home Depot they have large (around $3.00) and small tubes of Drywall Adhesive that is applied with either a large caulking gun (around $7.00) or a small caulking gun. I am about to start drywalling my basement and have unanimously decided to go with the drywall adhesive and a minimum amount of screws.
Awesomedell, you said that "Glue is used everywhere except on exterior walls where a poly barrier is applied over the studs". I have installed Kraft faced insulation with the flaps stapled to the inner face of the studs so as I can still apply adhesive for the drywall. Do you think this is wrong? I had a very experienced drywall company give me a bid and that is the only way he will drywall a basement. :mask:
 
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Old 02-09-05, 04:52 PM
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I Agree 100% with Awesomedell

years and years and years ago... we used to us nails when hanging drywall

Now everything is screwed!!! LOL

One of the reasons we stopped using Nails is because when the hangers were hanging the boards using nails they would pound that nail in till it "recessed" into the drywall......

Now keep in mind that there using waffle head drywall hammers to do this and when you bang the hammer head onto the surface of the drywall it tends to pull the Paper away from the gypsum..

and later on when that house is painted you would notice Bubbles where all the Nails where banged in"

and the only way to repair this would be to actually cut the bubbles out and re-tape and mud those areas.

or hang alot of pictures in the house..


Now.....

As Far as Using Liquid Nails goes....

we Basically only use it in the Commercial Field of hanging drywall on "Low-walls" under 5'.

we would apply beads along each stud and along the Bottom track...

The purpose is because the walls are susceptible to vibration and shaking people leaning on them....
 
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Old 02-10-05, 01:41 PM
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I dont know, but I believe I will pass on all that extra expense and hassle of "glue". and the screw holes are so easy to hide with da mud, that I surely dont see anything hard or difficult about that. Anyway, I guess im still living in the dark ages? Have fun with all dat glue!
 
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Old 02-10-05, 01:55 PM
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Oh yeah, I forgot to mention, if ya get that there glue on your hands or whatever it will take some mineral spirits or something like that to remove it.
 
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Old 02-10-05, 05:05 PM
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Roadhawg the reason for the glue is so you don't have to put all them screws in your board and then have to mud all them screw. Worse yet, odds are some of them screws are gonna pop 6 months down the road, & then guess what, you got a call back, that you're doing for FREE, as in you get paid nothing for warranty work except material, if that! I give warranty all of my work for two yrs with the exception of some repair work. Seriously if you ever hang a sheet of board on metal or wood studs with drywall adhesive and minimum screws, let it stay there a couple of hours, go back & pull every screw out of the sheet, & I defy you to pull that sheet down in one piece, in fact I'll give you up to a dozen pieces. Last company I worked for in 2001 before I threw out my own shingle required us to pull all of the screws out of stairways before finishing, call-back rate dropped to less than 01%. The board is laminated to the wall not just fastened. You ever heard of paper-faced bead down there?

Chopper as long as the paper isn't stapled to the edge (fastening surface) of the studs you should go ahead & use glue.

Lockpicker, really you didn't need to add that "and years and years" to your post, that's how I started in the drywall biz, heck for a year my boss only let me carry a hatchet, no tape, no knife, all I did was lift and hammer. For the first couple of months I was only allowed to hammer in closets.
 
  #14  
Old 02-10-05, 05:30 PM
lockpicker
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LOL Im with ya Awesomedell I started the same way "Hanging & Finishing"

Old school way In the darn closets for 3 months................

Looooooong 3 months and Mixing everyone's mud for them tooo on top of it

Our company focused on all the High Profile homes Eastern Long Island NY
 
 

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