Help skim coat drywall

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  #1  
Old 02-12-05, 06:40 AM
Ezor
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Help skim coat drywall

I removed wallpaper from drywall, and everything came off. Not only the drywall surface, but the joint tape and all. I'm left with the brown rough surface that was under the white drywall skin. I'll coat with Zinssner Gardz, and retape all joints. Then I'll need to skim coat the entire walls with joint compound so as to obtain a smooth paintable surface.

Problem is, a very thin coating of compound will be required, and I'm not at all good with a trowel. I've heard that light joint compound can be thinned with water, and applied with a roller, then sanded smooth.

Also, I heard about a thick primer that covers minor imperfections. What is this product, and might it eliminate the need for skim coating?

Thanks for any advice.
 
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Old 02-12-05, 09:45 PM
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Problem is, a very thin coating of compound will be required, and I'm not at all good with a trowel. I've heard that light joint compound can be thinned with water, and applied with a roller, then sanded smooth.
That's the right formula, use a wide knife to smooth it out and then sand smooth. USG makes a decent primer called Tuff-Hide and I've always had good luck with Valspar's new construction primer. HTH
 
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Old 02-13-05, 06:36 AM
Ezor
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Thanks awesomedell,

Question arises - you thin the compound in order to use it with a roller, but with it so thin, doesn't the trowel just wipe it off? Or at lesst make for a very uneven coat? Should the compound be allowed to set up slightly before trowelling?
 
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Old 02-14-05, 11:47 AM
aj3
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Using a roller will probably be more trouble than it's worth. Thin the compound to make it flow easier, but not thin enough that it runs or dribbles. As awesome said, use a wide knife. You'll find it's easier than you think - and nothing like trowelling mortar, which seems to be what you're comparing it to. You may need to go over some sections a few times to fill in low spots, lightly sanding between each coat to get rid of ridges.
 
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Old 02-14-05, 06:25 PM
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Being new to skim coating you may want to go with the roller. Get the thinnest nap roller you can. Roll on a coat. Let dry. When dry skim on a thin coat to fill in the orange peel left from the roller. You may need two coats to fill completley.
 
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Old 02-18-05, 06:04 PM
Ezor
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hanks

Thanks to all you guys who responded. I thined the compound slightly and troweled it on. Can't believe how great it turned out. Just got to go over a few spots, and it's as good as new.
 
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Old 02-20-05, 05:12 AM
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Glad it turned out well for you. I actually use a window squeegie to skim with, got a 24" that makes the job go quick, we do alot of skim coating, lot of old houses around these parts with cracked plaster walls.
 
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