Insulating a Brick wall to save room

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  #1  
Old 02-14-05, 12:46 PM
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Insulating a Brick wall to save room

We are expanding our ground-floor tiny bath to accomodate a whirlpool tub, but we are hurting for room to install it: every inch counts.
Construction is as follows: 8" cinder block (up to 3 blocks high), on top of that: 4" cavity block on the interior (offset 4" from the edge of the cinder block), 4" brick on the exterior.
For building that wall, I do not want to use even 2x3 or 2x4 framing, instead I want the thinnest possible application.
I am thinking of simply gluing or tapconning some small 1" ribs vertically to permit a air space between the block and the wall, then placing 2x3s sliced in half (1 1/4" thickness) horizontally. Next, I would place 1" R6 foam board in between the horizontal nailers.
The lower cinder block sticks-out 4", but the whirlpool tub platform will be built from that level down, so that "lost space" is not critical...it's the space above the top of the tub that is critical.
Greenboard would be placed about 1 foot above the top of the platform level, and 3/8" drywall for the rest.
Am I crazy or will this "work" to save us about 2-4" of wall space ?
 
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Old 02-16-05, 07:14 AM
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Hello & welcome to the forums.

I think you're plan can work, speaking of work, I gotta go get some done now, I'll get back on here tonight and eloborate on this for you. Meantime if you can post me a pic it would be helpful, I think I'm seeing this right in my mind, but I've got alot on it this morning.
 
  #3  
Old 02-16-05, 12:13 PM
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Pictures & A new plan

See these links for pix:
Front view
http://www.javazon.com/test/bath-DSCN1231.jpg

Right side detail
http://www.javazon.com/test/bath-DSCN1232.jpg

Left side detail (note how I had to slice some of the 8" block in half)
http://www.javazon.com/test/bath-DSCN1233.jpg
I changed my approach based on the rough, uneven surface I have to work with....I will add those 1" strips in a horizontal fashion by placing them inside of a flimsy frame to insure they are all aligned. Then tacked to the wall, I will fill-in the gaps where needed with QuickCrete Fast-setting cement by mucking in with a small trowel.
Then, the custom-cut verticle nailers will be counter-sunk and tap-conned into the brick/concrete using 2 1/4" hex-head screws.
Foamboard insulation will be cut and placed between the nailers. No electrical or plumbing needed on that wall....thank goodness !
Whirlpool platform will be built up to the height of the 8" cinder block....so the top of the block will support the platform on one side.
Beautiful large Andersen Arch window replaces the existing one.
 
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Old 02-17-05, 02:32 AM
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Not quite what I had pictured in my mind. You're going to be ok I think with your plan. Tapcon the nailers to the block, fill the voids between the nailers with rigid foam insulation and put up your drywall. You'll mostly likely get some other opinions on this, but for my $$ I'd skip the green board (M/R drywall), I've been doing drywall quite a few yrs and IMO it's not worth the extra $$. I routinely use regular drywall for everything. important thing is to have bathrooms properly ventilated with an exhaust fan and to use a primer on the board when it's finished, before putting on the finish paint. When choosing a paint for a bath or spa room, look for one that has a built in mold & fungus inhibitor included in it's formula. Sherwin-Williams Bath Paint is what I normally use, however I can't stress enough how important it is to have proper air movement in an area such as you are in the process of building. Mold & mildew thrive in areas with high moisture & a lack of air movement.
 
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Old 02-17-05, 01:01 PM
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Yep, you're right

The cavity block already provides for an air space.....so I think I'll just apply the foam board between the nailers.....which, because of the rough surface, will effectively provide a small air space anyway. I plan to use a high speed grinder to "knock down" the high-spots on the concrete wall. I know, I know...the dust will be incredible....already been-there-done-that.

A 110 cfm Panasonic whisper-quiet is going in.....for ventilation.

Paint and primer will be pure acrylic...but thanks for the tip on the mildew problem...as I was burnt once by using paint with no mildew additive. I have an MAB account, so I will see if they have a comparable "Bath Paint".

Thanks again for your help. Will continue to post as the project progresses !
 
  #6  
Old 02-21-05, 06:08 AM
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Sounds like you've got a pretty good fell for what you're doing. Godd luck and do keep us posted.
 
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