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120 degree outside corner


sean_sarah's Avatar
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02-15-05, 10:00 AM   #1  
120 degree outside corner

As part of a remodel we added a walk out bay. The bay created 120 degree outside corners that need finishing. When I framed this I added blocks to the V that was created by the walls and screwed the edge of the drywall to these blocks. The blocks were spaced 16" apart.

I've been planning to use a vinyl outside corner bead here and glue it using the 3M spray glue mentioned in a previous post and then push the bead in as necessary. That recent post however suggested that this glue behaves like contact cement which makes me worry that I won't get the bead pushed in sufficiently before it becomes a permanent part of the house. Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance.
Scott

 
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02-15-05, 02:47 PM   #2  
You won't be able to get any rigid corner bead to bend like you want it. You need to use a flex bead like no coat or straight flex. Or you can get 120 deg. splay. Thats corner bead bent to that angle. Then you can glue or more likely tape on.

 
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02-15-05, 05:24 PM   #3  
Coops28,
I have some paper tape that has two metal strips (1/2" wide each) that are fixed in the center of tape. I used this for some off 90 degree angle inside corners. Is this the type of material you are referring to for the outside corners? Without the bead is the corner more subject to cracking from inevitable bumping etc.
I've been using all purpose compound for the rest of this job. Should I use something harder for this particular joint?
Scott

 
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02-17-05, 03:02 AM   #4  
Hi Scott,

I have some paper tape that has two metal strips (1/2" wide each) that are fixed in the center of tape.
That's the flex-tape, it would do ok if properly applied, problem is it's sort of difficult to get that nice straight corner line you like to see in a professional job with this stuff on an outside corner. I think what coops was referring to was the paper faced metal corner bead. Great stuff, I've gone to using this exclusively for all outside corners on my drywall jobs. I haven't seen it in any of the big box stores in my area, I get mine from a specialized drywall supply house. Check you yellow pages under drywall suppliers. We use setting compound for doing the outside corners, it will be significantly harder to sand than the all-purpose you've been using, so it's important to get it as smooth as possible with your knife or trowel when you're working it.

I'd also suggest switching to the lite mud once you get all of the taping done.

 
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02-17-05, 01:50 PM   #5  
Thank you for your response. I called the building supply store where I bought the drywall and believe they have what you describe.

What is the benefit of using the lite compound. I've already completed the entire upstairs using all purpose which came out pretty good. I did wonder while I was mudding if the lite would have had some payback in ease of use although I didn't find the all purpose particularly difficult to use.

I do see why the setting compounds on outside corners would be nice given the drying time. These can't be purchased at different hardnesses can't they? If so what hardness do you use?

Thanks again
Scott

 
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02-21-05, 06:05 AM   #6  
Hi Scott,

Sorry I missed your follow up reply until this morning. The setting compounds come in different formulas based upon the time they take to set up. My supplier handles from 15 min up to 120 min. There are regular and lite formulas as well, I always use the easy sand lite, the regular is a real PIA to sand which is my least favorite part of the job.

I like to use the lite mud for finishing because it does work easier, also tends to pock and shrink less. Pocks are the small pinholes that mess up that slick mirror finish you get with a real nice final coat.

 
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