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Installing Gyprock Vertically or Horizsontally ?


BradL's Avatar
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02-24-05, 12:48 AM   #1  
BradL
Installing Gyprock Vertically or Horizontally ?

G'Day Folks,

this is my first post after having searched through the archives for an answer.

I'm wondering what the concensus is with regard to installing Gyprock (drywall??). Excuse me speaking in metric but I'm in Australia and that's what I try to work in nowadays.
I'm renovating our house, replacing old and daggy plaster with Gyprock. Our ceiling height is 2.7 metres which means if I use the 'standard' method of mounting the Gyprock horizontally I have to cut another sheet to fill the gap of approx 300mm left between the 2 sheets and the ceiling. I was wondering if there is a problem with me purchasing 2.7 metre sheets and mounting them vertically so they cover floor to ceiling (with the 10mm gap at bottom) ?
I realise there will be more vertical joins along the wall but is there any structural reason why mounting them vertically is frowned upon ?

Thanks & Regards,
Brad.


Last edited by BradL; 02-24-05 at 05:57 AM.
 
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02-24-05, 04:21 AM   #2  
Aarno
Brad - first allow me to apologize for not paying closer attention in school - when we were taught the rudiments of the metric system.

Anyway, I believe what you're saying is that you have a ceiling height around 9' or so - and if you hang the drywall horizontally, you'll be left with a 'gap' of about 1'. But if you hang the sheets vertically, you'll be left with about a " gap on the bottom. (I think that's right.)

And your direct question is "...is there any structural reason why mounting them vertically is frowned upon?"

First off, I'm assuming you're dealing with wood studding. If you were hanging drywall against metal studs, then I would strongly encourage horizontal hanging - because doing so ties the studs to each other. Not so with vertically hung rock which allows "give" in the walls. In fact, I believe it's code.

So again - assuming you're hanging rock against framing lumber... Generally speaking, it's better to hang drywall horizontally because not only does it tie in the studding, but it tends to "flatten out" the walls. Further, if the studs are not aligned with each other (looking from one end of the wall to the other), you can shim or plane them accordingly to help flatten out the wall.

In your case (and speaking as a property owner and not a professional), I'd prefer to hang the rock horizontally. After the ceiling is up, I'd fit the sheet tight against the ceiling all around the room - and work down with the joints staggered. I would then put the 1' piece on the bottom.

Back to your question - as far as I know, the only "structural" reason is what can be gleaned from the above. On occasion, I've hung the rock vertically... no problem.

Getting away from the structural aspect, keep in mind that it's generally considered to be easier to tape and mud horizontal joints than vertical joints. And to repeat, hanging horizontally (the longer the sheets, the better) flattens out the walls - in those cases where the studding aren't closely aligned.

I hope this response addresses your question, somewhat. At least it's a start on your request for a "consensus."

Aarno

 
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02-24-05, 05:29 AM   #3  
Hello Brad and welcome to the forums.

The previous poster has pretty well lined out the differences in hanging on steel stud vs wood. But I'm assuming that your home is wood framed as metal stud framing for residential is pretty uncommon, at least in the USA anyway.

Not sure as to it's availability down under, but here in the states we typically handle hanging 9' walls with a product called stretch rock. It is 4'6" wide instead of the standard 4' width of regular sheetrock. This allows you to cover the wall without the necessity of putting a ripped piece up. You will have look for this thru a drywall supply yard, as it isn't available thru home centers and the like here in the states anyway.

If this isn't an option for you I think I would stand the sheets up, buy 9' or 10' board, cut them to height and stand them up. Try to put any ripped sheets in corners with the ripped edge towad the corner for easiest finishing.

As was suggested look down the wall framing and if there are any stud that are sitting proud (high) from the rest of the studs, use a block plane or sureform to plane down the stud to flush it out with the wall. Likewise any low studs should have shims place on them to bring them up to flush before you hang the board to achieve a flat wall.

Hope that helps out a bit and G'day to you.

 
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02-24-05, 06:04 AM   #4  
Aarno
Quote: "...but here in the states we typically handle hanging 9' walls with a product called stretch rock. It is 4'6" wide instead of the standard 4' width of regular sheetrock."

Now 'that' is good information - and worth repeating. 'Was not aware that product existed.
Hanging drywall just became a whole lot easier. Thanks.

Aarno

 
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02-24-05, 06:36 AM   #5  
Aarno,

Look for Drywall Supply House in your local yellow pages. It's absolutely how all pros hang 9' walls, most rooms can be hung w/o butts or rips with the 14' or 16' sheets, that's what it's made for. We also use it for real high ceilings as well, alot of new homes these days tend to have at least one room with either a vault of just a high flat or tray ceiling in them. Last one I finished had a 15' ceiling in the main room. We used stretch rock on all of that wall so we can avoid having a seem land in the floor joist system between floors, in the old days we'd put a rip next to the lid so avoid the seem falling in the wrong place. If you hang with a seem on the floor line like that it'll crack more likely than not in the first yr.

 
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02-24-05, 07:12 AM   #6  
Hi
I would hang horizontal.
first sheet but up agains the ceilling and work my way down
I would stacker my joint not to have all the joints line up.
Better look and shows less tape joint showing

good luck

pg

 
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02-24-05, 10:58 AM   #7  
Aarno
Quote: "Look for Drywall Supply House in your local yellow pages."

Yes, I plan to do just that. As in most cases, it's pays to shop around. Not only for price, but to find out what's available out there.

This morning (after reading your post), I stopped by a Home Center of sorts which services mostly contractors. Asked about the drywall, and they do sell it 54" wide - <edit> 12' sheets only. The wider sheets are understandably a bit more expensive than standard sized drywall, but there's little doubt that the wider rock can save time and labor in certain applications - so the difference may end up being only slight, if at all. One more quill in the quiver.

Aarno


Last edited by Aarno; 02-24-05 at 03:06 PM.
 
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02-24-05, 12:36 PM   #8  
BradL
Thanks Guys,

I've had a look at the web site for the company that make the stuff out here and there is a wider product available (1350mm or 4' 6") so I will be making enquiries at my local hardware to make sure he can supply this for me as it's apparently not available in all states over here. Failing that I think I will go for the vertical arrangement with 9' lengths.

Thanks & Regards,
Brad.

 
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02-26-05, 06:37 AM   #9  
Glad I could help aarno and Brad.

 
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02-26-05, 09:07 AM   #10  
Aarno
Quote: "Glad I could help aarno and Brad."

Be thankful you have willing students. 'Cause sharing info' is the name of the game. Right?

Aarno (and hoping to learn something new every day.)

 
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