Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Drywall Repair (Cutting Tool)


searay1's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-25-05, 01:39 PM   #1  
searay1
Drywall Repair (Cutting Tool)

I've had about 12" of drywall cut out along the bottom edge of my walls (2 bedrooms) in order to dry them out from a flooding situation. They did not make a straight cut and I plan to patch the dywall myself. First I need to square up the cuts, and I have a drywall hand saw, but was wondering if there was a tool used in a power drill that cuts drywall quicker than a saw and fairly straight. I have about 50' of drywall cutting (to square up) and am hoping someone out there knows a better way than using a saw / exacto knife. Thanks for your assistance. searay

 
Sponsored Links
IHI's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 502

02-25-05, 06:08 PM   #2  
Sawzall would be about the fastest for that situation.

 
Aarno's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-25-05, 07:36 PM   #3  
Aarno
Sure you can use a power tool - or two. For one example, you could snap (or scribe) a line around the walls then take a circular saw with the depth set to cut very slightly more than the thickness of the drywall - and cut away. Very dusty - but it'd get it done, I suppose.

However, if was my project - I would 'not' use a power tool. I'd snap or scribe the line as before, then use my drywall saw and carefully follow the line. If you wanted, you could even make a shallow cut on the line with a sharp utility knife. Then follow that with your drywall saw. That lessens the chances of a jagged edge. But even if the edge isn't clean, you're going to tape and mud the joint anyway, so - no harm.

If you don't mind me saying, searay, cutting 50' of drywall is no big deal - even by hand. My vote is to keep it simple.

Aarno

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

02-26-05, 06:19 AM   #4  
Personally I'd snap a line and cut it with a rotozip. But if it was me, I'd just cut the drywall at 4', yes this is going to cost you a bit more in material, but a 12'x4' sheet of 1/2" board is only like $10-$12, to me the extra $30 in material is worth not to have to try and finish next to the floor, not to mention you're most likely gonna have outlet boxes and what not in the way at that level. We just did a sub shop that had a similiar deal, except these guys cut the board 8" off the floor. The finishing and retexturing cost them $1100, I would have only charged them about $700, the extra was for aggrivation.

Another option is to not worry about the jagged edges, just cut the really bad part out hand your strips, fill the gaps with setting compound let that dry, do a second fill coat if it's real bad and then tape. Or just leave it alone, fill in with rock as tight as possible to the existing rock and then cut some paneling down and put up like a 36" chair rail at the top of the paneling, that'll dress up a room if you're into the look. Good luck.

 
searay1's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-28-05, 12:41 PM   #5  
searay1
I snapped the lines and used a circular saw in one room. The cutting went fast but the cleanup takes a lot longer. Dust everywhere and hard to see when the air fills up with it. I used a hand saw in the 2nd room and it was easier and quicker than I expected. I got my replacement peaces cut and will screw them in this evening. The electrical boxes are just above the cut, so no problem there. I dont have a sawzall and I'm not familiar with the rotozip. Will investigate. Hopefully, once I tape and mud the joints, texture (skip trowel) and paint the reworked areas, it will look good as new. Thanks a bunch for all your ideas
Searay
Sometimes the short-cut takes longer in the end.

 
IHI's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 502

02-28-05, 01:05 PM   #6  
Everybody HAS TO HAVE a sawzall (reciprocating saw) even if it does nothing but sit around, mount it above your desk and display it like a hunter displays his shotguns and rifles. Now imagine the Tim Taylor "Grrr"

These tools are second to none when it comes to destruction with metal and wood. 6amp motor minimum, longer the stroke the quicker the cut, but think most are at least 7/8" stroke.

Not only good for destruction around the house, I've used both my corded and cordless for branch removal when constructing out buildings and I forget to throw the chain saw in.

 
awesomedell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,425
MO

02-28-05, 02:03 PM   #7  
I've used both my corded and cordless for branch removal when constructing out buildings and I forget to throw the chain saw in.
I hear ya, used mine for some quick tree trimming before as well, cordless one also works well for downing a small cedar tree from the back pasture for Christmas time, and it's alot lighter than luggin a chainsaw back there!

 
Aarno's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-28-05, 07:19 PM   #8  
Aarno
Cutting drywall with a sawzall or a CS is overkill (imvho). Sometimes simple is best.

Not to get too far off topic, but while we're discussing sawzalls I'll offer one tip which is sure to make life a whole lot easier. ...Taking a tree down is relatively easy. Removing the stump is not. Most times, we cut around the stump and whack the roots with an axe or an adze and hope for the best. The last thing we'd want to do is try to cut the roots with the chainsaw, because if you hit a rock with one tooth - you'll hit them all. Not good. Instead, just cut them with your sawzall. Never a problem.

Even better is when running line posts. If there's a root to be found, you'll find it. Again, holding the sawzall vertically with the blade pointed down, just drop it straight into the hole and remove a section of the root. Battling roots is tough work. (As anyone who's had to deal with tree roots will attest.) Battling them with a sawzall in the manner described above is the easiest and quickest way I've found to take them out. And now back to our regularly scheduled topic.

Aarno

 
searay1's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

03-01-05, 12:10 PM   #9  
searay1
Maybe I will get a SAWZALL for my birthday. I can then mount it proudly for all to see. I don't know how I survived this long without one.

Thanks again for all the comments.

 
Search this Thread