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Drywall: Vertical or Horizontal


psal2's Avatar
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04-06-05, 08:12 AM   #1  
Drywall: Vertical or Horizontal

I am doing a wall which would work out very well running the sheetrock vertically rather than horizontally.

The wall (12' wide) will have a door (32") about 48" from one wall and about 64" from the other (so it is almost centered...this is necessary do to some other objects and where they need to be placed).

By going vertically, I can use one 4x8 panel on the 48" side, a full 4x8 panel on the 64" side and a cut out for the door. Same on the other side of the wall.

This is being done in a garage to make a workshop/pantry area. There needs to be an outlet too. It will be at the edge of the door cut out panel closest to the full 4x8 sheet.

I was told it is easier to do it horizontally. Not sure why? Any recommendations?

Thanks,
Pete

 
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04-06-05, 10:18 AM   #2  
Yes, it ought to be hung horizontally. For several reasons:

It will likely look better. A poorly taped vertical joint can be spotted a lot easier than a horizontal one because of the way the light shines across it.

Less taping, easier to tape. Imagine a 12' wall with no doors hung vertically. You have 2 joints 8ft long (16 ft). Now imagine that same wall hung horizontally, with 12' rock. only one 12' joint.

Stronger connections. You don't want a drywall joint going straight up from the corner of your doorway, because they often will crack. This is what would happen if you ran it vertically the way you plan. When you run drywall horizontally, doorway or window openings can be spanned so that you avoid joints above the corners of r.o's.

It also seems easier to me. Hold the sheet horizontally, lift it up against the ceiling tightly, and screw it off. Then you've got a nice reference line to measure your lower outlets off of.

I'm sure a lot of it is just preference, but for a normal 8' wall, i'd always lay them down.

 
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04-06-05, 10:37 AM   #3  
With XSleeper just 2 sheets 4X12 and your done.

ED

 
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04-06-05, 11:06 AM   #4  
I have two sides of a wall to do and a door in the middle. Also 8' much easier to transport (got to use a mini van...sorry). I can move the door a little so that the 48" on the right become 32" and span 16" across above the door. The other side would be roughly 80", so about 16" left over from this side. I count 3 seams both sides, 1 horizontally both sides of the door and 1 above the door in the middle.

Also, this is going into a garage/workshop and a pantry/laundry that will only be used by the family and I understand the aesthetic appeal but don't believe it is a major concern (at least not yet).

Of course, I do see your point on the 12' sheet. That would be a lot easier. I wonder whose truck I can borrow?

Pete

 
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04-06-05, 11:37 AM   #5  
I been doing some thinking (did you smell something burning?) and I will go with the 12'.

If I am correct, I can hang the top section over the door jam, cut it from the back (or front) to allow for the door, right?

And once that is done, same for the other side. It does appear that one seam is a much better idea. That is why I ask you guys the questions.

Thanks,
Pete

 
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04-07-05, 10:05 AM   #6  
jmazur
perhaps a silly question....

well, this post answered my first question

so i figured i'd ask part two here...
is it recommended to do the ceilings first or the walls?

thanks,
--j

 
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04-07-05, 12:12 PM   #7  
Always hang the ceiling first. That way when you hang the walls you can slide the rock up to the ceiling and it will help hold it.

 
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04-07-05, 12:14 PM   #8  
jmazur
perfect!
thanks....

also...
i have installed kraft faced r-15, one of the rock guys said to put a 4/6 mil poly over that?

is that right? just doesn't seem right to me.
outside is tyvek'd inside is kraft faced, and now poly???

 
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04-07-05, 01:21 PM   #9  
Ceiling first for sure Might want to put some scrap blocks on any plate that runs with the joist. This way you cant push up the drywall on the celing there. You dont need to do this when the plate runs across the joist
You stapled the paper inside the studs so it cant make a bump in the wall. So yes put a 4/6mil poly over the whole thing so you have a good V/B over the whole wall.

ED

 
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04-07-05, 05:33 PM   #10  
jmazur


thanks ed!
you always seem to have my answer!!

thanks again....

--j

 
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