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rough walls


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07-11-05, 09:03 AM   #1  
lynnmike39
rough walls

I have a problem in my living room. The texture on the walls is really rough and we don't like it but before painting would like to smooth it out. Mostly it's just bumpy with places that have swirls, streaks, and lines from the mud (it was done intentionally, just not our look). There is also a spot that looks repaired, and not very well done. I thought about sanding but with the couple of layers of paint that are already on it I wasn't sure how that would work.

Any suggestions would be appreciated,
thanks,
Mike W

 
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07-11-05, 07:07 PM   #2  
The easiest thing to do would be to scrape what you can and then skim coat the wall with joint compound.

 
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07-11-05, 07:09 PM   #3  
lynnmike39
rough walls

what would be the best thing to scrape it with?
thanks,
Mike W

 
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07-12-05, 06:49 AM   #4  
I would use a wide putty knife. You don't want to scrape hard [easy to damage wall] only to get it where it takes less mud to skim coat.

 
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07-21-05, 11:45 AM   #5  
Depending on the age of the plaster it may contain asbestos, so take precautions.

 
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07-21-05, 11:56 AM   #6  
Nobody said anything about plaster walls or asbestos!!!

 
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07-22-05, 08:21 AM   #7  
Posted By: coops28 Nobody said anything about plaster walls or asbestos!!!

I didn't suggest that they had and that is why I posted. My reason for posting was that many people are not aware of the ways asbestos has been used (e.g. in plaster) and that it can represent a hazzard. Although the word "mud", was used in the original post, I was under the impression that texturing could also be done with plaster. Is that not the case? I was simply trying to be helpful, not alarmist.

Personally I would rather get such warnings before I begin than after the job is complete. There are many fretfull posts to these forums by people, who months or years ago completed jobs, which they now fear may have jeopardized the health of themselves or their families.

 
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