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corner angle is not 90 degrees--how to fix?

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  #1  
Old 07-12-05, 04:26 AM
lud
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corner angle is not 90 degrees--how to fix?

Hello,

I'm having a kitchen installed next week and the people who are going to be doing the installing measured the kitchen and told us one of the corners is 92 degrees, and that we will need to fix that before they can put it in.

I haven't got a clue what the best way to do that is. It seems to me that the easy solution would be to just figure out where they're going to need to attach the cabinets and bolt on some pieces of wood to the wall so that they have something to attach them to, but this will obviously leave some space between the counter top and the wall which will need to be filled in. We can tile over some of that space but it looks to me like there will be about 3/4 of an inch gap by the time the counter top ends--that will be pretty ugly.

I've dreamed up a few ideas but none of them seem like good ones. This has to be a common problem in old houses. Is there some accepted way of fixing this short of putting in a new wall?

Thanks, Lud
 
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  #2  
Old 07-12-05, 06:36 AM
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Ive never heard of cabinet guys having trouble with an un square wall. Especially only 2 deg. How did they come up with that anyway. All that to say I'm confused about your problem. which corner isnt 90. The inside? Outside?
 
  #3  
Old 07-12-05, 06:43 AM
lud
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hmm

I'll do my best to describe:

If you're looking at the long wall, the short wall is to your right. The corner where those two walls meet is 92 degrees, so it is slightly obtuse.

I am having a stone counter top put in, and this only comes in 90 degrees from this place. So they could put it in but there will be a big gap the farther you go from the wall.

I have measured it myself and it looks to me like once you get about four feet from the corner the gap widens to several inches.

To answer your question though, i live in Holland, and nobody here is terribly helpful if a situation is at all unusual. I expect they'd put it in anyway even if I didn't fix it but they wouldn't do it well.
 
  #4  
Old 07-12-05, 06:56 AM
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Could you notch out the wall 1/4"-1/2" and then apply a tile backsplash to hide the imperfections?

All my ancestors came from Holland in the 1800's
 
  #5  
Old 07-12-05, 07:24 AM
lud
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thanks

your ancestors' offspring are good with water, bad with service!

I'm sorry I don't really know what you mean. I'm functionally handy with tools but I don't know the lingo. Tile backsplash?
 
  #6  
Old 07-12-05, 01:04 PM
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Backsplash is a common term in the USA but maybe not over seas. What it refers to is tile, laminate etc. that is applied to the wall above the counter top. It effectively dresses up the edge of the counter and provides a good water resistent area above the counter top. It can be low [like baseboard] or can go up the wall to the bottom of the top cabinet.
 
  #7  
Old 07-12-05, 01:32 PM
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Ok. I see what you mean. The counter will hit the corner in the back and have a 2" gap in the front. So no backsplash will cover. That is a problem. The only thing I can think of it to square the wall before installation. put shims on the outer corner of the wall to make it 90 deg. Put new sheetrock on the wall and new corner bead.
 
  #8  
Old 07-12-05, 11:41 PM
lud
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Thanks Coops.

Our plan is to put tiles on the wall between the countertop and the overhead cabinets. Can I put them straight on the shims? I ask because the kitchen has already been measured, so if I put drywall on it will throw off the original measurement.

Of course I could just put the drywall on between the countertop and the cabinets if necessary...

Also, will the lumberyard people look at me like I'm nuts if I ask for shims that are 4 feet long and as wide as possible? Is it possible to have one great big shim that would square the wall, like the size of a sheet of drywall?

Thanks a lot you guys, you're convincing me that this isn't the huge job I thought it would be.
 
  #9  
Old 07-13-05, 06:06 AM
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You have to determine what the gap will be and what size shim you will need. At that point you can get a 1x4 that is 8 feet long. Actuall thickness is 3/4". Something like that. Also, I was thinking of removing the drywall you have then re hang when its shimed square. That way it won't mess with the measurements.
 
  #10  
Old 07-13-05, 06:46 AM
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hi
i do cabinet and countertop and if the wall is not square i scribbe the counter top and fit it to the wall.
you installer are to lazy to do it or don't know how to.
 
  #11  
Old 07-13-05, 07:53 AM
lud
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OK, I think I get it. Although the wall isn't drywalled, it's some kind of wallpaper over plaster over brick. Can't be 'removed' I think.

I have done some very accurate measuring and the corner angle is actually 91.5. At 115 cm from the corner the gap becomes 28 mm. That ain't much, but apparently it's too much for these guys. They say they can't mess with the countertop because it is natural stone and they won't be liable for screwing it up, I don't know if that's laziness or not but like I said before, nobody here is too forthcoming when it comes to dealing with unexpected situations so I have to deal with it.

Coops, I figured I'd square the whole wall to avoid any ugly gaps between the wall and the black countertop, so I'm about to go tell the guys at the local lumber store that I need to cover a surface area of 115cm x 270cm. Is that stupid? can you make shims out of sheets of plywood or the like?

Thanks again.
 
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