Interior wall with vaulted ceiling


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Old 08-25-05, 02:23 PM
Inlander
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Question Interior wall with vaulted ceiling

I want to put up a wall across a room with a vaulted ceiling so there are no joists to create a top plate with. How do I support the top of the wall or make the wall sturdy enough without a top plate? I want to start this project right away but I have this problem I cant solve. Please help
 
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Old 08-25-05, 09:07 PM
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Your question is stated in such a way that it's hard to understand what the problem is. You are making a wall that runs perpendicular to the peak of your vaulted ceiling? So the wall will be located between the ceiling joists? Is that it?
 
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Old 08-26-05, 10:03 AM
Inlander
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Yes, you hit the nail right on the head (no pun intended). Also, Im trying not to go all the way up (if possible)so there will be about 5ft. between the top of the wall and the joists. If I have to go all the way up then so be it but I really didnt want to since the 2 seperate rooms will be sharing a wall mounted air conditioner and ceiling fan
 

Last edited by Inlander; 08-27-05 at 08:53 AM.
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Old 08-26-05, 10:39 AM
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Well, if you can get up above the ceiling, in the attic, you can install blocking in between the ceiling joists... pieces of 2x6 that are 22 1/2" long that will get laid flat on your ceiling and be toenailed to the ceiling joists. If you install blocking every 3' or so, that will help to give you something to nail a top plate to.

You need a top plate, and you need something running vertically to it to give your wall stability. Instead of picturing a wall with no top plate, picture a wall that goes entirely to the ceiling, but with 2, 3, or 4 large "window-like" openings located wherever you want. The studs that are located between these openings is what will give your wall stability, because they will run all the way from top to bottom.
 
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Old 08-26-05, 12:26 PM
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New wall.

So, you have a room with a vaulted ceiling and you want to put up a wall to make it two rooms. Because it has a vaulted ceiling you only want to put up an 8 wall so that both rooms can share the ceiling fan and air conditioner right?

If this is what you plan on doing then you will have to locate a stud in the wall on both sides of the room. If the new wall is going to be the same height as the existing wall you should be able to attach to its header. On the opposite wall you will have to attach the header to one of the studs. Then when you are putting up the wall you will be attaching the footer to the floor and both ends of the new wall will be attached to the studs of the existing walls. That should give you enough strength to keep the wall from moving.

This is what we did when I helped a friend add a wall on the second floor of his house.

Good luck.
 
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Old 08-26-05, 03:51 PM
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How long is this wall going to be? I guess I was assuming the vaulted ceiling was in a huge room, with a high ceiling and that the wall was going to be quite long.
 
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Old 08-27-05, 08:52 AM
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Yes, the room is an addition put on by the previous owner. So one wall is actually the back of the house (plaster) and the other wall is the room addition wall (drywall). I can locate the header on the room's wall but not sure about the house side wall. Would it be about the same location as the room addition wall? Also, the new wall I want to put up will be about 15ft. long.
Thanks for the input!!!
 
 

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