cement backboard

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  #1  
Old 08-26-05, 08:34 AM
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cement backboard

Do I have to put tape and joint compound of the seems of the backboard if I'm going to put ceraminc tile on it. Thanks for your advice.
 
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Old 08-26-05, 09:45 AM
JD Hay
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Question Backboard taping and tiles

Firstly it is not clear from your term "backboard" what it is you are using. Is it gyproc board or what?
If you are using gyproc or as some call it drywall board, I would recommend taping the seams, especially because there are indents in the drywall which cause an uneven surface at the joints, unless you use tape and filler. One coat over the tape should be sufficient to level the surface.
Secondly, unless you want to drive yourself crazy, I would recommend that the tiles you use are of clay, not ceramic. There is a difference between the two materials. Tiles of clay are much easier to cut and fit, especially for the weekend warrior. Ceramic tiles are made like glass and to get good clean cuts takes expertise and the proper expensive cutting tools such as a wet saw.
Good luck on your project and I hope these tips help you.
 
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Old 08-26-05, 02:37 PM
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I'm using a product called durock. It's a cement drywall board for wet areas. I did purchase a wet saw because this is one of 4 bathroom and a kitchen that I plan on remodeling (help me).
 
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Old 08-26-05, 04:07 PM
JD Hay
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Cement backer is correct -- good

Durock is a good choice and I'm glad to hear you chose it. But do not take any shortcuts with it. If you look closely, it is made like drywall board in that it has the indents at the edges to take fiberglass tape and filing compound. If you don't fill the seams as instructed with the Durock, you will rue the day. Especially, because you may end up landing on the indented surfaces and your tiles won't lay flat and cause you trouble grouting later.
Furthermore, you probably should start from the centre of the area and work your way out to the edges. Using a measuring tape, level and a chaulk line you may want to plot out your tile layout before cutting. The reason for starting from the centre out, is so that your cut tiles, which may be smaller than the centre, are all along the edges, at the top and or bottom. This way you can get a symmetrical pattern to your tile placement.
In working with tiles one rule persists...no shortcuts.
When using your wet saw, which I'm pleased to hear you purchased, don't rush it. Keep the proper amount of water running and take your time cutting. Especially as I mentioned earlier, if you are using ceramic tiles. Treat them, when cutting, like glass because their characteristics are the same. The edges are the weakest part of the material and are easily chipped and/or cracked.
Because you are using a long lasting material, it makes no sense to take shortcuts with the application, if you want to get the most out of your project.
Good luck on your project!
 
  #5  
Old 08-28-05, 06:46 PM
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Thanks for all of your helpful advice.
 
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