Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Horizontal vs Vertical Hanging


howardlr's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-23-05, 05:20 AM   #1  
howardlr
Horizontal vs Vertical Hanging

I have read several articles and I have tried hanging drywall both in the horizontal and the vertical. Is there truly a preference? My hang-up (no pun intended) is when hanging in the horizontal, how do you ensure that at the bottom the drywall is straight enough so that when you come along and install the baseboards they don't want to "lean" out because of the drywall groove? I just don't get the advantage to the horizontal method...


Howard

 
Sponsored Links
thezster's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268

09-23-05, 06:12 AM   #2  
There is no right or wrong... It's six of one/half dozen of the other....

The standard way to hang these days is horizontally. This puts the majority of your seams horizontal instead of vertical (obviously), which makes for less obvious seams in the finished product due to the way light falls on vertical vs horizontal seams. This method also allows the use of 12ft sheets on walls with less than 12ft ceilings. Your concern over the manufacturers finish causing your baseboards to lean out leads me to think you've got 8ft ceilings. If so, and you use 12ft sheets horizontally, you'll have less taping/bedding to do overall.... Again - there is no rule.... just what is "typically done" these days...

As far as the "gap" along the bottom. If you are concerned about your baseboards "rolling outwards' due to the manufacturers finish - you can always run a layer of mud over the board when taping and bedding.

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,794
TN

09-23-05, 07:06 AM   #3  
As thezster said hanging horizontally makes for easier/better finishing. If you don't want to add mud at the bottom you can rip some thin strips [like paneling] and use them as a shim behind the base.

 
senor-mouse's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 65
WA

09-23-05, 08:27 AM   #4  
Horizontal:
1.Makes for a stronger, stiffer wall.
2.Tapers like horiz. seams at around 4' up - no bending over or reaching up.
3.Easier to hang.
4.Walls 7'-10" high or less - hang the top sheet first and rip the taper off the bottom sheet - solves the baseboard issue.
5.Cut butts (sheet ends) to deal with framing inaccuracies.
Vertical:
1.Whole job can be done with NO butt joints.
2.Baseboard tipping is not an issue.

If you must have a taper at the bottom see Marksr's comment. Cardboard butt strips ripped in half lengthwise would be the perfect size for furring the baseboard.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,285
NE

09-23-05, 03:41 PM   #5  
99% of houses I work in have the drywall hung horizontally. The finished edge of the drywall along the floor has never caused me any grief when installing baseboard. I'm more concerned about cussing the tapers that leave big blobs of drywall at the bottom of their inside corners and butt joints.

The only time the finished edge created a problem was on one occasion where there was no lid- no drywall on the ceiling, which means the walls were rocked up to the ceiling joists (5/8" higher than normal) and so the rock was about 1 1/4" off the floor, which meant the finished joint might possibly show over the top of the baseboard. I had to go around and install 1/2" osb strips underneath the drywall so that the baseboard wouldn't tip inward as you mentioned.

 
howardlr's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-25-05, 08:58 AM   #6  
howardlr
Thanks

I appreciate all of your responses. I am still a little bothered by the tapered edge on the bottom. If a ceiling is 8 ft, then it would take two horizontally hung pieces of dry-wall to go from top to bottom. This being the case I still have to deal with the taper at the bottom when installing the floor molding. Putting cardboard to shim it out just doesn't sound kosher (or professional-looking) to me. It would be so much better if the bottom was finished, but cutting the taper off and butting a piece just defeats the reson for horizontal hanging; having just one seam.

Am I missing something?

Thanks again....

 
thezster's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268

09-25-05, 09:23 AM   #7  
Sounds like you're a perfectionist. And there isn't a darnded thing wrong with that.... "However"...... shimming the manufactured edge with plasterboard shims (they manufacture those of thin cardboard, about 4ft long X 1inch wide) is perfectly acceptable (kind of goes along with being a perfectionist). It won't show.... it gets the job done...... and reduces the taping/bedding (gawd, I hate that part) you'll have to do..

As mentioned above though - there is no "right or wrong"... do what works best for you - and you'll be happier with the results in the end.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,285
NE

09-25-05, 02:47 PM   #8  
Yeah, I agree. I don't mean to sound like a know it all or anything, because I'm not, but I think the problem is that if professionals like myself regularly install baseboard right over the top of that taper and it doesn't cause us any grief, then why is it bothering you? Even if it causes the baseboard to sit 2 degrees off of plumb, who cares? The places baseboard NEEDS to be plumb (or at least it's always helpful if it is) is at inside and outside corners. And those areas are finished to the floor and there's no taper there, theoretically. Its a normal practice, it works for tens of thousands of trimmers around the country, so I wouldn't lose any sleep over it, because its the least of your worries.

 
Search this Thread