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My interior ceiling needs repair;


TRTaylor's Avatar
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09-25-05, 10:14 PM   #1  
TRTaylor
My interior ceiling needs repair;

My interior ceiling needs repair because my flat roof has a leak. The raccoons tore it up for some reason. I have put piping around the tree to keep them off and I have a contractor to fix it.

Tonight after a long day of rain it is an internal problem. The drywall is soaked as must be the insulation. It is in a front entrance area about 8 X 10. The texture is sand in paint finish white.
So what do I do? The roof leak is draining the rainwater in the tape seam right down the middle in the drywall taped seam in one end about two feet long. The paper on the drywall has a 6 diameter bubble not thick.
Must I take the whole ceiling down or can I try and patch in a repair, tape and sand out?
Is it a big deal to cut and remove the whole ceiling? How would I go about this?
I am an electronics tech and handy as I have owned a rental property and did all the work my self. Plaster, carpentry and painting yes. This type of drywall work is new to me.

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09-26-05, 05:57 AM   #2  
Before you do anything... make sure the roof doesn't leak any longer....

As long as the damage is restricted to a relatively small area, it is possible to patch the problem. Cut your drywall out at least a foot from the visibly damaged area. Check the newly cut edges for moisture damage (swelling) to make sure you got all the "bad stuff". Note the thickness material.... 1/4 or 1/2 or 5/8 - and go buy some.... Cut the new material to size and secure in place with drywall screws/nails. You will probably need to add some 2 X 4 blocking mated to your ceiling joists so you'll have something to nail/screw into. Finish by taping/bedding/texturing/painting/enjoying. Yeah, that's simplified... but covers the basics....

 
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09-26-05, 07:00 AM   #3  
TRTaylor
Right... fix the leak

This morning the rain stopped and the new day is started. I don't work a midwatch 12 to 8 so beer is out. I see something.. All that has come off from the gypsum drywall is latex paint in sheats like.

Could be when the roof is open I could pull out the old soggy insulation, lay in some new and let the roofers have at it.

A bit of sanding and mud in the eye. What say you?

 
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09-26-05, 07:08 AM   #4  
I dunno........

If your paint is coming off in sheets, then your sheetrock may be saturated.... Not good! Back to the original idea... When the roof is off, and insulation removed, you should be able to see the water stained areas of drywall..... that's the portion to be removed...... if not now... then when it falls to the floor.....

 
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09-26-05, 07:46 PM   #5  
TRTaylor
Yah and I have lots of time to do it over

The old fix it right trick the first time.

Let's see I won this sear drywall cutout tool. I could make a template larger than damage, screw it up and router out the damage. Then router a new piece of drywall with same template, back it up with wood say 3/4 inch X however long and screw up the patch after removing soggy rockwool and laying in new. Roofers show up the end of the week and all work waits till then.

Planing now



What say you?

 
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09-26-05, 09:11 PM   #6  
It's quicker to just fix it once, right?

Sounds like a lot of templating going on... It'll work, but it kindasorta not necessary.

Run your new router against the ceiling joists that frame the damaged area....(so that the joists still support the remaining drywall - ie: not exposed) It should have a blunt tip that is designed to follow a joist/electrical box/lighting fixture cutout/etc. Draw a straight line along each end and cut along that..... voila.. a pretty straight cutout. Your "patch" should be about 1/4 inch "shorter" on all 4 sides than the opening... to allow for ease of installation (less is better, but 1/4 is acceptable).... Sister your new framing to provide "meat" for screwing the new patch into place along the edges..... tape/bed/texture/primer/paint.... and have a beer...

 
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09-27-05, 11:06 AM   #7  
TRTaylor
Ok I am catching on


Find the ceiling joist and cut with saw just inside these and a bit of zip zip for straignt clean edges but mabee not at all necessary. Draw straight and square between these with hand drywall saw and down comes old and to size for new patch. Sister up wood to screw to and fit new. Zip zip.

Just thinking through the process of bringing down old and using it to size fix.


 
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09-27-05, 11:28 AM   #8  
Quick study...

Quite the apprentice.... no complaining.... just learning......You'll make someone a good husband one day....

 
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09-27-05, 05:31 PM   #9  
TRTaylor
20 Years Celibrated In Hawaii In March

My bride has been around 20 + years. Took her to my last duty station in the US Coast Guard and saw what I hadn't in 31+years.

Been around the world a couple of times. Flew in the Coast Guard as Search and Rescue Air crew, worked in mines in Australia and now I see to it your mail goes through this big processing and distribution facility without a hitch as an Electronics Technician for the US Postal Service. Always wanted a carpenters apprentiship or anything in the building trades. Until the PO I learned my lesson about telling of my disability and discharge. Nobody hires a crazy Vietnam vet.

Hasn't been a picknick I am bipolar and life can be eather running away and me keeping up or a real drag and down I go. The VA knows what to do with Vietnam era vets like me as well as my wife.


Thanks for your support as well.

 
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