Durock vs Green Board in bathroom


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Old 10-01-05, 06:06 PM
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Durock vs Green Board in bathroom

I'm planning a basement finishing project and plan to include a small bathroom with a stall shower. What is the appropriate wall board to use? The shower will be completely tiled, while the rest of the bathroom will only be partially tiled. What are the advantages and disadvantages of Durock cement board versus Sheetrock Green wall board?

Thanks in advance
 
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Old 10-01-05, 07:03 PM
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The Durock in the shower is permanent. The green board will deteriorate in a few years and will have to be replaced with Durock. In areas that are not subject to getting wet the green board will probably work but I heard it is being discontinued.
 
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Old 10-01-05, 08:20 PM
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Use the Durock/wonderboard/CBU as the tile substrate with a moisture barrier behind it.... Tile/grout is not waterproof.... just water resistant. The Durock will last, as mentioned above......Greenboard in areas adjacent to the shower. Regular sheetrock for the ceilings with quality paint/primer...
 
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Old 10-02-05, 01:49 AM
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Durock vs Greenboard in bathroom

For a moisture barrier, do you recommend plastic? Other? If plastic, what gauge? Also, what is CBU? And is Wonderboard another manufacturer's equivalent of Durock?
 
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Old 10-02-05, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by GaetanoL
For a moisture barrier, do you recommend plastic? Other? If plastic, what gauge? Also, what is CBU? And is Wonderboard another manufacturer's equivalent of Durock?
I like plastic sheets 4 - 6mil. easy to install.

Durock/Wonderboard/CBU (cement based underlayment)- all different names for different water resistant materials for laying tile on - usually comes in 3 X 5 sheets ($10ea). Remember - tile/grout/durock is not waterproof - merely water resistant - hence the need for the moisture barrier to protect your studs.

You'll also need caulking for all your joints that meet at an angle (corner/corner,wall/ceiling, shower pan/wall). Need a flexible material to avoid cracking in those areas. Colored caulks are available to match your grout (more or less).

All items available at one of your favorite big box stores.......
 
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Old 10-02-05, 07:01 AM
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Durock vs Green Board in bathroom

Thanks.

I plan on using metal studs for the framing. Would you still use plastic under the durock? I assume installation of plastic to metal is same as with metal track to stud: 1/4 metal screws. Is that right? Recommended spacing?
 
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Old 10-02-05, 07:21 AM
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Hmmm.. never used metal studs before - prefer wood....... but I would still hang the moisture barrier - metal, even galvanized, rusts over time, especially where those screws go through it. 1 screw every 12 inches....

Might want to wait for a more knowledgeable "metal worker" to chime in....
 
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Old 08-16-10, 01:18 PM
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Never heard of using a moisture barrier. If moisture were to penetrate the tile and durock, wouldn't the moisture barrier cause the water to drip down the wall to the subfloor? Seems like it would be better without a barrier so any moisture that does happen to make it that far could dry out rather than drip down and collect. Am I wrong here?
 
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Old 08-16-10, 01:46 PM
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mossman...it's an old post....but...

Basically the moisure barier redirects excessive water back down into the tub/shower. Or as it collects and runs down it is re-wicked though the thinset and grout where it evaporates, though there shouldn't be that much going through the grout. The plastic sheeting is installed so that it does that.

The main thing is to keep it away from wood in the enclosed wall space...not much chance for evaporation there.
 
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Old 08-16-10, 04:33 PM
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Now that makes sense. Thanks for explaining.
 
 

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