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rkoudelka's Avatar
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10-18-05, 11:50 AM   #1  
Here's something interesting...

There are a few threads here discussing vertical vs. horizontal hanging of sheetrock.

At Home Depot, I was browsing through a book on drywall by Stanley (the tool company). In it, it mentions that horizontal is a stronger job not just because you catch more beams, but also because sheetrock has a grain - the grain runs parrallel to the beveled edges. Like wood, it is stronger when you work with the grain.

Has anyone ever heard that before?

 
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10-18-05, 12:07 PM   #2  
I suppose it is possible. Sheetrock is ground up gypsum, watered down into a slurry and poured on a roll of paper,almost immediately topped with paper and run through an oven to dry out the moisture.


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10-18-05, 12:16 PM   #3  
Here's something interesting...

You are not buying a material that is supposed to be strong.

What kind of strength are you talking about? Compressive? Tensile?, Shear? Comfined compression, punching shear? Torsion?

What kind of attachemnt to make the walls stronger?

There are many more questions that are just as unimportant.

Sheetrock is a low cost building material that has a wide allowable range of properties and all of them change with the weather. It is not used as a structural product and both methods are acceptable for separating two areas and holding up paint.

You don't hear much about it because it is not important (unless you want to sell a book).

Dick

 
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10-18-05, 01:50 PM   #4  
Sure, I believe that. It's similar with plywood. When Drywall is hung vertically, the studs may have more of a tendency to bow (as they dry, since most kiln dried lumber isn't really "dry"). If you hang it horizontally there may be a better chance of the studs staying straight.

I've got a sheet of drywall sitting vertically against the wall in my warehouse, and it's totally bowed. I might as well throw it away. I can't say that I've ever noticed drywall bow like that when its sitting horizontally.

 
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10-18-05, 07:14 PM   #5  
[QUOTE=XSleeper]. When Drywall is hung vertically, the studs may have more of a tendency to bow (as they dry, since most kiln dried lumber isn't really "dry"). If you hang it horizontally there may be a better chance of the studs staying straight.
QUOTE]


I always thought that hanging horizontally minimized the effect of already bowed studs. Maybe it is some of both


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10-18-05, 07:29 PM   #6  
heh heh. well if the framing isn't bowed by the time the house is stocked with rock, it will be soon. Hard to find a straight wall anymore.

 
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