Drywall for 24" On Centers Framing

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  #1  
Old 11-19-05, 05:39 AM
thompsdw
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Drywall for 24" On Centers Framing

Is it really necessary to use 5/8" drywall for 24" O.C. framing? What will happen to the wallboard if I use 1/2"?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-19-05, 08:30 AM
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You risk the drywall sagging between the joists over time if it's your ceiling.
 
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Old 11-20-05, 06:36 AM
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Hail Thezster!

Always use 5/8 on 24" centers. You can rent a drywall lift from "The Big Boxes" for about $30 a day so you won't kill your back trying to lift & shift the rock. If you use 1/2 it will sag eventually.

When it sags you will get the "Amphitheater look" between each joist.

1/2 on walls isn't so bad, but the walls will "wobble" if you push between the studs, possibly cracking the joint.
 
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Old 11-28-05, 11:52 AM
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Well, lets say you already have all the sheets of drywall for the ceiling on site, and you didn't realize this and bought 1/2" DW already.

Any way to fix the situation short of reloading the 1/2" stuff into the truck, returning it, buying different DW, taking it back home, unloading it, etc...?
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-05, 12:21 PM
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Is this for a garage, basement, or in your house?
 
  #6  
Old 11-28-05, 02:26 PM
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Garage.

My best idea so far, is to hang it, then run 1 by's underneath the drywall, perpendicular to the joists, attaching my screws up thru the drywall to the joists, thus supporting the drywall from underneath in the "opposite" direction the joists are supporting. Not sure what distance OC I'd want to do the 1 bys...probably 24"?

Sort of a pain in the butt, but should be easier then getting new drywall and really should go up fairly quick. And also not too ugly either...I could tell people it's an "architectural feature". I could even spark a design revolution.
 
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Old 11-28-05, 04:25 PM
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When I worked in fla there were several builders that used 1/2" on 2" centers, not ideal but it will work. Worst thing is any bowwed studs will show up more. Also it is easier for some one to punch a hole in it - but then we try not to do that
 
  #8  
Old 11-28-05, 08:50 PM
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I guess my biggest concern is not so much how its going to look right after I'm done, but how it might look in 15 years.

I probably wont be living here, but I still don't want to leave behind a garage ceiling that is sagging like an 80 year old...
 
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Old 12-04-05, 06:37 AM
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My best idea so far, is to hang it, then run 1 by's underneath the drywall, perpendicular to the joists, attaching my screws up thru the drywall to the joists, thus supporting the drywall from underneath in the "opposite" direction the joists are supporting. Not sure what distance OC I'd want to do the 1 bys...probably 24"?
IMHO, this idea won't look too good. Best solution to this situation short of replacing the 1/2" board with 5/8", again IMHO, would be to fur out the existing joists with 1"x4", (2"x4" would be better yet), place the lumber flat against the joist so you will have a 3-1/2" nailing point, which will give you a nice wide nailing area for the drywall. The furring should be laid out on 16" centers. You can use #3 lumber for the furring, this will save you some $$. I'd also pick up a large pack of shims and use them to level out any imperfections in the original framing, so you end up with a nice flat ceiling.

Hang the ceiling first and then hang the top wall sheet butting it up tight to the ceiling board. This will support the edges of the ceiling sheets, just be careful when you hang that wall sheet not to push the edge of the ceiling sheet up to far, you need to have 90 degree corners to make the taping phase of the project go smoothly.

HTH
 
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Old 12-04-05, 07:41 PM
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Well, lets say you already have all the sheets of drywall for the ceiling on site, and you didn't realize this and bought 1/2" DW already.

Any way to fix the situation short of reloading the 1/2" stuff into the truck, returning it, buying different DW, taking it back home, unloading it, etc...?
Yep, quit shopping at the big box. 1) they would have told you that you needed 5/8 for the ceiling. and 2) They would load up 5/8 sheets, bring it to the site and take back the half.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 02:33 AM
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Originally Posted by awesomedell
IMHO, this idea won't look too good. Best solution to this situation short of replacing the 1/2" board with 5/8", again IMHO, would be to fur out the existing joists with 1"x4", (2"x4" would be better yet), place the lumber flat against the joist so you will have a 3-1/2" nailing point, which will give you a nice wide nailing area for the drywall. The furring should be laid out on 16" centers. You can use #3 lumber for the furring, this will save you some $$. I'd also pick up a large pack of shims and use them to level out any imperfections in the original framing, so you end up with a nice flat ceiling.

Hang the ceiling first and then hang the top wall sheet butting it up tight to the ceiling board. This will support the edges of the ceiling sheets, just be careful when you hang that wall sheet not to push the edge of the ceiling sheet up to far, you need to have 90 degree corners to make the taping phase of the project go smoothly.

HTH
I agree, reframe on 16's perpendicular to the existing joists before you hang the rock. Nobody will ever know the difference. The ceiling space you lose won't matter, unless it is a very low ceiling, and it gets in the way of a garage door or something.
 
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Old 12-05-05, 09:46 AM
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Enh, this question sat for a week, then you guys answer it the day after I hang all the drywall?!?



I just put it up on the 24's. I have to admit, this is by far the hardest DIY project I've ever done. I think it dosent help that my garage ceiling is 10'6". It's been quite a learning experience. I have tremendous respect for anyone who does this for a living. It's @#%!$#@ hard!

I'm going to continue with my plan of supporting from underneath the DW. Frankly, I don't really care what my garage ceiling looks like, and I'm going to paint it all white anyway so I don't think it'll look that bad. I fully understand it's not the best solution, but this has been a major learning experience and the next DW project I do, I'll know how to do it right to begin with (instead of finding out after the DW is on site).
 
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Old 12-06-05, 12:16 AM
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Sorry for the late reply, been an extremely busy year for me.

I have tremendous respect for anyone who does this for a living. It's @#%!$#@ hard!
ROFLMAO

I once bid a remodel job for a local guy, he decided that he could do the job himself and save himself some $$. So he goes out & rents a lift and everything, he & his wife wrestled one 12' 5/8" sheet up on a bedroom ceiling, managed to break 3 of the corners out in the process, but did get it up & screwed off. This took the poor folks about a half according to their own account. Then after resting up for another 1/2 hour, Chris called me and offered a bonus if we would indeed come please hang his drywall. While we were hanging he commented at how easy me & my partner made it look, to which I replied "it is when you know how."

Run your 1"x's on 2' centers, the same way you ran the drywall, and you'll only have a few butt joints to tape& mud. Prime it with new construction primer (PVA), and then shoot a fine splatter on that ceiling and it'll look great. Use a heavy texture on it & the 1"x will hardly be noticable.
 
  #14  
Old 12-06-05, 01:52 AM
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I enjoy the times when people gasp at the price to do a patch. "all it is is a little patch" they say...

I then break it down for them:

$125 for the patch

$25 for the material
$100 for the labor
$40 goes to the government, $60 to me.
for $60 I drove to your house 3 times,
1 time to quote, 1 time to patch/coat, 1 time to sand
For about 5 hours of my time I earned $60, or $12/hour.
Then I ask them if they could come to my house and do the same work for $12/hour.
They always tell me how great my prices are...
 
  #15  
Old 12-06-05, 12:00 PM
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Dell, that was going to be my suggestion since he's adding furring strips perpendicular to the drywall joints. Use the same material and go over the joints essentially making squares or rectangle areas....or in short, a REALLY poor man's coffered ceiling LOL. Least doing it that way will eliminate any joint taping/mudding and give a more symetrical design when finished.

And yes, these tall ceilings are a PITA regardless, espcially when it's not your day to day gig...makes for a sore neck, shoulders, and arms LOL!! Rolling scaffolind will make the finish line come alot easier/sooner.
 
  #16  
Old 12-07-05, 06:27 AM
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I did not read this whole thread ,but got the jist. I would have used 2 by 4 metal track,cut them into 27" pieces[or use a whole piece and notch for the joists] then cut the ends and fold them down and hammer them flat then screw the flaps to the joists[does not take long at all]. and you have support for the 1/2 " drywall.The only problem I ever had was you have to use fine thread screws for the metal and course for the wood.

My first thought is always ?metal studs or track[no holes]? in this type of situation. Firring outlike mudslinger is a good idea here to since dropping te height really don't matter.

I would never have thought of that awsomedell. It might be ok for a garage-maybe and it will save on the taping of the high ceiling though,but I don't think my customers would buy it.

Like I said I did not read the whole thread and if this solution does not apply--- it does not apply.I know the job is done.
 
  #17  
Old 12-08-05, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by awesomedell
So he goes out & rents a lift and everything, he & his wife wrestled one 12' 5/8" sheet up on a bedroom ceiling, managed to break 3 of the corners out in the process, but did get it up & screwed off. This took the poor folks about a half according to their own account.
Wow, they were working pretty fast. It took me about an hour per sheet for at least 75% of the sheets that went up. The other 25% seemed to go up awful fast, maybe 15 mins or maybe even 10 mins on those ones. I suppose with practice they all go up that fast.

And, as for the notion of resting, that wasn't an option when I was paying by the hour for a lift!

This is definately one DIY job I wish I could go back and start over from the beginning. It'll be a lot easier next time. But, I still think people who do this for a living are warriors.
 
  #18  
Old 12-09-05, 02:05 PM
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Arrow 5/8 r 1/2 inch

Originally Posted by thompsdw
Is it really necessary to use 5/8" drywall for 24" O.C. framing? What will happen to the wallboard if I use 1/2"?
well use if its the ceiling use fir strips on 16 inch centers then 1/2 inch sheetrock for as the walls both will work
 
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