Sagging Drywall hole in the ceiling.

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  #1  
Old 11-29-05, 06:13 AM
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Sagging Drywall hole in the ceiling.

The Previous owner installed a ceiling fan in my bathroom at some point which is good. The drywall around the fan is sagging and cracked and he forgot to insulate the ducting which is bad. I Went in the attic to insulate the pipe and noticed none of the drywall from the bathroom ceiling is tied to the joists anymore I can litterally run my fingers under the joists and drywall.

It's an old house os 3/8" sheets of drywall were used all over (ceiling and walls) I'm guessing it's sagged over time and is no longer held in place.

The joists run 24" on center.

Am I going to have to replace the whole ceiling in the bathroom? I've never done a ceiling before. And I have no budget for it.

I was going to go up there and clear the celullose (like 10" worth) all around and cut out the bad piece screw in some 1/4" ply to the remaining good drywall and screw in a patch but with the current drywall sagging I imagine that wouldn't hold long.

The other option I'm thinking is to cut my patch the size of the span between both joist and use 1/2" drywall which would come out flush with the rest do to the sagging and screw it in the joists and tape and mud it.

What's the better option? I know taking it all down and puttting a 5/8" ceiling would be best but I don't have the expertise to do that I think

EDIT: The bathroom is small and likely 2 sheets of drywall should cover the ceiling. I think the room is 5-6' wide by 10' long.
 

Last edited by Gotrek; 11-29-05 at 06:39 AM.
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  #2  
Old 11-29-05, 06:48 AM
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I wanted to clarify only the area around the fan seems to be sagging however I did not clear the cellulose elsewhere tto check.

I'm going to clear it away tonight and find where the sheet of drywall that is sagging begins and ends and replace it with 3/8" sheet of the same size or f the entire ceiling is sagging I'll get 5/8" and replace it all..


Edit here is the basic layout of the room along with were the joists are and sagging area.

It's not to scale and I realize my spacing of the joists is off

 

Last edited by Gotrek; 11-29-05 at 07:00 AM.
  #3  
Old 11-29-05, 09:09 AM
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I'm no pro, but I'm thinking that replacing the whole ceiling will be easier than patching part of it.

The sheets are $7 - $8 a piece.
 
  #4  
Old 11-29-05, 10:13 AM
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I agree I've kind of resolved myself that this is what I'll do since it's such a small ceiling.

I've done walls before (mounting the drywall boards) and patches but never ceilings and never taped and mudded apart from using stick on mesh tape and polyfilla


For tonight I'm going back in the attic and shoveling all the cellulose out of the valleys to expose the entire ceiling of the bathroom and see just how bad it is, To see if only this one piece is sagging or the entire ceiling, if it's just the one board I may just remove it and replace it instead fo the whole ceiling.
 
  #5  
Old 11-29-05, 10:21 AM
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I believe you would get the best job by replacing the ceiling. I remember when some of the cheaper builders used 3/8" rock on the walls but I believe they alsways used 1/2" on ceilings.

If the sagging rock is still sound you may be able to push it up to the rafter and secure it with screws.

Replacing the ceiling isn't an overly expensive job if you DIY. Shouldn't cost more than $35 unless you also need to purchase finishing tools. It isn't what most would consider a fun job, can be quite messy but it isn't all that hard to master. Wish you luck.


$35 estimate was based on using 2 sheets of drywall and not the actual 3 or 4 that gotrek used.
 

Last edited by marksr; 12-01-05 at 11:12 AM. Reason: correction for new info
  #6  
Old 11-29-05, 11:00 AM
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Repair before replace

I agree that the first order of business should be trying to repair rather than replace. If you can identify the sagging portion of the drywall.... rig up a "T-square" (piece of 2X4 scrap attached to 2X4 scrap perpindicular)... and have someone push up on the sagging ceiling while attaching new screws through the board to the joists, working your way every 6 inches from where it is secured to where it sags the most. You might get lucky and have it hold well. The original nails may pop their heads through the finish - but that's minor compared to replacing the ceiling.

If that doesn't work.... well, replacing isn't difficult - just hard (there is a difference).... Good Luck!!
 
  #7  
Old 11-29-05, 11:15 AM
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Thanks guys. I'll try to push it back up first but a goo 12" squard section needs to be replaced for sure so with that siad if I do repair instead of change the hole thing I have to stiuck with 3/8" sheets correct?
 
  #8  
Old 11-30-05, 07:47 AM
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No go on the pushing back up. I tried and tried tightening it by screwing screws every 3" no go it's finished. So I started moving the cellulose and wood chips out of the valleys between the studs. Then tried to cut around the damaged area without cutting through the vapour barrier.

I know what's wrong. It's 3/8" drywall with 8"x24" strips of 3/8" drywall for support every foot or so. So like a doubled up 3/8" sheet but not a full sheet on the first course. It's retarded.


I' m finishing moving the insulation (as much as I can it's to tight for me to get to at the ends because of the pitch of the roof. Then hopefully the vapour barrier will hold up the rest of the insulation while I finish breaking off he drywall.

I probably should call a pro at this point But I'm broke and it's 3 sheets of drywall I don't need it to be pretty just hold the insulation
 
  #9  
Old 12-01-05, 09:01 AM
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If anyone is still reading this a bit more advice.

I've got my 5/8" sheetrock. 4 sheets one extra in case screw up.


I've ripped out the entire ceiling last night. Not bad job, pretty happy with myself

Ok so my question the ceilings were built with 3/4" total thickness (sort of doubled up 3/8") I have 5/8" sheets leaving me with about 1/8" left when I'm done installing the new panel's tonight.

Do I need to add 1/8" piece of wood on the joists to fix this gap or will the tap and mud take care of that? or should I fill it with spackle before taping?

Also I need to put new vapour barrier as there are holes here and there in the old one. It was installed up the walls on both sides and folded to the middle where it was tied to the center joist. Can I put the new piece over the old one sealing it with Vapor barrierglue which I have or do I need to cut out the old piece? Can I cut it from the attic once I've sealed on the new piece?

Please reply I'm almost done (I consider done when I have the drywall screwed to the ceiling I'll feel done even though I know I still need to tape/mud/paint I just want a ceiling on my head before the kids come home next week
 
  #10  
Old 12-01-05, 11:08 AM
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I assume the gap you are concerned with is where the wall and ceiling meet. Mud and tape will take care of that gap.

If the holes in the vapour barrier are small you might just tape them with duct tape. I would think that you could install a new vapour barrier over the old one although I don't know for sure. I would also think that once the rock is secured to the ceiling it would seal the new barrier to the old.
 
  #11  
Old 12-02-05, 07:36 AM
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Wow I'm done and it was not bad and looks ok... I took pictures for your entertainment and will upload them later.

I mean I did a crappy job compared to a pro but it turned out as good as I expected.

the first sheet was a learning experience I wanted each sheet to fit perfect and tuck into the groove in the walls I quickly learned to give myself a bit more clearance and the rest went well, well you'll see either way

Tapping and Mudding this weekend...
 
  #12  
Old 12-02-05, 08:25 AM
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You will need to use paper tape on the angles/corners. Be sure the bed coat with the tape is dry before recoating with mud - the weight of the fresh mud will loosen the tape if it isn't good and dry.

The better you apply the mud the less sanding you will need to do. Personally I would rather apply an extra coat of mud than do a lot of sanding.
 
  #13  
Old 12-02-05, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
You will need to use paper tape on the angles/corners. Be sure the bed coat with the tape is dry before recoating with mud - the weight of the fresh mud will loosen the tape if it isn't good and dry.

The better you apply the mud the less sanding you will need to do. Personally I would rather apply an extra coat of mud than do a lot of sanding.

I've got paper tape and I'll let each coat dry I've read all the onlinetapping corners how too's so I'm ready to attempt it.

But first I still need to remove the old tap that's on the wall portion. (were there is some some joints had no tape (go figure)
 
  #14  
Old 12-03-05, 05:04 AM
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I agree with Marksr as far as filling and letting dry completely. I would use easy-sand to fill any major gaps before commencing on taping the joint, especially because you have a vapor barrier in the room which will prevent the "prefilled" areas from drying before Christmas (perhaps literally).

Easy-sand is a curing type joint compound that will fill and cure within the hour (depending on the type you used).

Concerning your ceiling being "retarded", don't worry about it. Even if your mud job ends up looking retarded you'll appreciate it far more than if you would have hired me to come in and do it for $350, because you made it. Believe me, I made my son and he is retarded ... and he is far more beautiful than any drywall job I have ever done in my 20 years of drywall.

I hope this helps
 
  #15  
Old 12-05-05, 06:11 AM
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I agree with you mudslinger only the tape has been applied at this poitnand I'm already very satisfied with myself
 
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