Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Walls and Ceilings
Reload this Page >

Lower half of wall is cinderblock, upper half is regular studs

Lower half of wall is cinderblock, upper half is regular studs

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-11-05, 08:04 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 182
Lower half of wall is cinderblock, upper half is regular studs

Howdy-

I ripped out the old tile and wallboard in the downstairs stall shower. It's needed a gutting since the day I bought the house.

The side wall of the shower has cinderblock from the ground until about 4ft up and then the studs start. The studs aren't flush with the cinderblock - they hang over the block but about 1/2", which was meant for a piece of insulation board.

The issue: I can obviously fasten the drywall board to the studs in the upper region without any problem, but how will I attach it to the cinderblock??

Do I:

-pre-drill my holes and use the regular drywall screws

-pre-drill the holes and use special cement screws (do they have some with good drywall-esque heads?)

-use plywood instead of the 1/2 insulation board, attach the plywood with cement nails, and then I can use regular drywall screws to attach the drywall to the plywood?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-11-05, 08:40 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 8
Or C: Attach furring strips to the cinder block at 16" or 24" centers with tapcon screws, insulate between them, and rock away. Good Luck
 
  #3  
Old 12-11-05, 09:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,615
this is more of a question for the ceramic tile forum. If this is below grade I would think twice about putting any holes in the cinder bloc.. Not saying you can't do it just think about it and maybe post in the tile forum
 
  #4  
Old 12-11-05, 10:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 749
I had the same issue when I gutted on of my rooms.

Instead of drilling into the cinderblock, I attached studs to the existing studs; these were placed perpendictular. That way, I was able to drop the stud all the way down to the floor, so I could not only fasten the rock but have a nailer for the baseboards.

Your situation may be different, because this will put the entire wall out abut 1 3/4" and may interfere with the rest of your room, but for me it worked great because I had no restrictions as far as space goes.
 
  #5  
Old 12-12-05, 11:23 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 182
Thanks! I think I'm going to try option 1. I figure a couple of 1*4's running vertically will be my 'furring strips'.

Next questions: Should I use a heavy plastic vapor barrier? If so, do I put it between the cinderblock and the furring strips or between the furring strips and the drywall?

Should I take the time to buy treated 1*4's for the furring strips or do you suppose that priming some untreated boards already in my possession will suffice?

As for the other suggestions:

I like the idea about running new studs on top of the old studs but that would ultimately involve having my shower base be farther out than the current drain pipe will allow.

I too wondered where to put this post. The bath remodeling forum doesn't generate many replies, and because it's not a plumbing question either it doesn't really belong in plumbing/showers. I'm going over the new drywall wth an acrylic shower so it's not really a tiling question (unless you were implying that the tile folks would have the best knowledge of my issue; I wouldn't have known that before posting anyway).

Thanks to all,

Chris
 
  #6  
Old 12-12-05, 03:31 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 8
Use treated furring strips against the cinder blocks. Find some 1" dense foam insulation (I.E-not the crap that falls apart and makes a mess of little white beads all over the floor) and cut to fit between the furring strips. Put vapor barrier over this and then sheetrock.

Make sure you get screws made for use with whatever type of treated lumber you get. Different treatments will corrode different types faster than others.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes