Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Taking out old drywall and putting up new?!


C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-28-05, 09:22 AM   #1  
C&S Rodriguez
Taking out old drywall and putting up new?!

I'm debating pulling out the old and replacing it for several reasons, just to let you know I am new home improvements as this is our first house.

I'm posting here to either have you all talk me out of it becuase it will be way to much work or too difficult for an amatuer or for you all to inspire me and give me the advise I need to get it done!

Here is the background I'm working with on the house.. It was built in 1971, it has two bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs/ two bedrooms two baths the kitchen dining room and living room downstairs. Every room has tile so I am literally looking to work from the top down.

Ok my reasons for replacing the drywall are:

1.Check and possibly replace insulation
2.replace windows with double pane
3.while the walls are open I wanted to get cable and phone lines run to the rooms.
4. while the walls are open I wanted to get a thermostat added upstairs (the upstairs gets way to hot while the rest of the house is way to cold and vise versa during summer)
5. some of the walls look slightly bowed around the windows in room here and there.
6.it sounds easier than scraping off the popcorn from the sealings to get it smooth.
7. it would give me a good opportunity to have an electrician come and check the wiring to make sure I can add recessed lighting as mentioned in another post some require wiring that would not already be in my house.
8.it would give me a chance to have the plumbing checked throughout the house.
9. I'm looking to move my back door a full 90 Degrees so that wall needs to be redone for sure and I'm looking to remove the back door from the master bedroom and replace it with a half wall and window!

Like I said if anyone else can think of any way to get all this done without ripping out a lot of drywall and replacing it please let me know I know the drywall around the windows will probably be replaced.

We apprecial all feedback!!

C&S


Last edited by C&S Rodriguez; 12-28-05 at 10:09 AM.
 
Sponsored Links
Concretemasonry's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 6,125
MN

12-28-05, 10:24 AM   #2  
Taking out old drywall and putting up new?!

Since it sounds like you will be living in the house while you do it, one room at a time would be the best appraoch.

Pick out an easy, out of the way room like an upstairs bedroom, seal off the heat supply and returns and install plastic so you can close off the door when you need to. Strip off the sheet rock and go to it. Without any plumbing inside the room you will get a good exposure what the rest will be like and you will be learning the basics. You will see both interior and exterior walls and how the doors are framed.

If you are lucky, you may uncover the back of the bathroom plumbing and be able to see what is going on. It will make any bathroom work easier.

If you have the confidence and desire, then just go from there to other rooms.

Good luck.

Dick

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-28-05, 10:39 AM   #3  
C&S Rodriguez
Posted By: Concretemasonry Since it sounds like you will be living in the house while you do it, one room at a time would be the best appraoch.

Pick out an easy, out of the way room like an upstairs bedroom, seal off the heat supply and returns and install plastic so you can close off the door when you need to. Strip off the sheet rock and go to it. Without any plumbing inside the room you will get a good exposure what the rest will be like and you will be learning the basics. You will see both interior and exterior walls and how the doors are framed.

If you are lucky, you may uncover the back of the bathroom plumbing and be able to see what is going on. It will make any bathroom work easier.

If you have the confidence and desire, then just go from there to other rooms.

Good luck.

Dick
Actually I have three questions now that I think about it, when redoing the drywall are closets a pain? And do I need to remove any part of the door (crown molding, etc??).. Are ceilings hard to do without a drywall lift?

 
Concretemasonry's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 6,125
MN

12-28-05, 10:46 AM   #4  
Taking out old drywall and putting up new?!

Closets are a bit of a pain since they get a little small to work in and they have just as many corners as a square room. The good thing is that you really do not have to be as fussy (my opinion) because they are hare to look at.

If you remove the sheet rock, you will have to remove the trim. You may not want to remove the ceiling sheet rock if you have loose blown in insulation without a vapor barrier ( a messy disaster!). Adding attic insulation is best done from above if you have the room and access.

Dick

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,316
NE

12-28-05, 10:52 AM   #5  
I like Dick's plan a lot because it makes sense. Why tear out the entire thing and then realize you're in over your head? If you do a small room or closet first, you'll find out how difficult it is, how big of a mess it's going to make, and whether or not you have the skill needed to tape and finish it. Finishing drywall isn't that hard, but some people just can't do it. It's a skill that takes practice, also. So if you happen to do it one room at a time, hopefully you'll be getting pretty good at it by the time you get to the last room!

You might find that your current walls are lathe and plaster, which will be a real big mess with dust. Some people will leave the lathe on, and drywall right over it. If you tear out your current walls, all the trim will need to come down- baseboard, casing, crown, etc. You might be able to save it, but the possibility also exists that you could wreck some of it, and if it's irreplaceable that might present a problem. If you plan on putting up all new anyway, then it's not a problem.

As far as closets are concerned, I don't mind doing them. The pieces of drywall are small and easy to handle. The biggest problem occurs if you're a fat man in a small closet, trying to tape without getting the back of your pants in the mud you just put on!

If you have plans of rewiring, replumbing, adding lights, cable, phone, etc... tearing off the drywall is probably the best method of doing all that. One problem with the insulation, however... if you have any blow-in cellulose in your walls, once you tear off the drywall, all that insulation will come falling into the home. If you have lathe and plaster, you would want to leave the lathe in place (as mentioned previously) so that all that insulation stays in place.

And you'll want to prepare the wife for the mess, because the whole process is long, messy and very dusty. So what Dick said about the plastic sheeting is pretty important. Try to close off the areas you tear out from the rest of the house that you want to attempt to keep clean... relatively clean, that is.

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-28-05, 11:34 AM   #6  
C&S Rodriguez
Actually what I was considering as a good place to start was upstairs since its only two smaller bedrooms and a smaller bathroom, redo all that and run the wires so that as I go down stairs (I have a break in the stairs by the way and with the high ceiling on that I may have a proffessional come out and do that part it depends on how I feel LOL.

As for the fat guy in the closet thing I'm tall and skinny so I can avoid any unwanted mudbaths

One thing I did not mention is that I have flat roofs so I really don't thing it has loose insulation I think its probabyly the padding(sheets, whatever they are called) so is there any foreseeable problem there?

I know this will be a big project, especially changing out windows and such but I'm thinking its worth it I just have to convince the wife of that!

I keep hearing mention of sheetrock that's another name for drywall or am I missing something?

(p.s. plastic sheets will be my first investment in this )


Last edited by C&S Rodriguez; 12-28-05 at 01:01 PM.
 
Morphyous's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-28-05, 04:31 PM   #7  
Morphyous
My wife and I also just bought our first house. We are in the middle of removing all the sheetrock, the plaster under that and of course the wood sheething. As the others have mentioned it is extremly dusty and a lot more work than one might think. Most of the work is in the clean up. This isn't our first time with work like this, but we too are doing it just because there are so many other things that are wrong with this house, it will just be easier to fix without the plaster. There has been several times that we remove the plaster and found something that the previous owner tried to fix, or cover up, and my wife and I just look at each other and say "Why?" like wire juctions with no juction boxes, instead of using insolation with a vapor barrier ( which cost less than without) he used plastic as a vapor barrier. We also learned that our house had a fire in the kithchen at one time. And the kitchen ceiling was lowered instead of repaired. So I beleive if your up for the work it will be worth it just to make sure everything under the sheetrock is up to code or at least safe and not going to damage your home later on.

Here a few things to think about before you start.
1) the mess.... and with it ... the clean up
2) be prepaired to have to fix the previous owners screw up's
3) The damage that we found in our kitchen... we don't want burnt timbers in our house so we're ripping off the whole back end of the house ("T" shaped house) and rebiulding the whole thing, and while we're at it we're going to raise the roof in that section 5 feet and put a room upstairs.... So be aware that you may find something that may cost thousands to repair or rebiuld.
4) one last thing to consider is... in my town of Greenfield Mass, Plaster is the most expensive thing to get ride of at the town dump $70 C.Y.. Also most roll off dumpsters have a weight limit before they start charging you more, and plaster is heavy.

Thats all the advice I have for now. Work hard, work safe, and have fun while your doing it

Eric

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-28-05, 05:08 PM   #8  
C&S Rodriguez
Posted By: Morphyous My wife and I also just bought our first house. We are in the middle of removing all the sheetrock, the plaster under that and of course the wood sheething. As the others have mentioned it is extremly dusty and a lot more work than one might think. Most of the work is in the clean up. This isn't our first time with work like this, but we too are doing it just because there are so many other things that are wrong with this house, it will just be easier to fix without the plaster. There has been several times that we remove the plaster and found something that the previous owner tried to fix, or cover up, and my wife and I just look at each other and say "Why?" like wire juctions with no juction boxes, instead of using insolation with a vapor barrier ( which cost less than without) he used plastic as a vapor barrier. We also learned that our house had a fire in the kithchen at one time. And the kitchen ceiling was lowered instead of repaired. So I beleive if your up for the work it will be worth it just to make sure everything under the sheetrock is up to code or at least safe and not going to damage your home later on.

Here a few things to think about before you start.
1) the mess.... and with it ... the clean up
2) be prepaired to have to fix the previous owners screw up's
3) The damage that we found in our kitchen... we don't want burnt timbers in our house so we're ripping off the whole back end of the house ("T" shaped house) and rebiulding the whole thing, and while we're at it we're going to raise the roof in that section 5 feet and put a room upstairs.... So be aware that you may find something that may cost thousands to repair or rebiuld.
4) one last thing to consider is... in my town of Greenfield Mass, Plaster is the most expensive thing to get ride of at the town dump $70 C.Y.. Also most roll off dumpsters have a weight limit before they start charging you more, and plaster is heavy.

Thats all the advice I have for now. Work hard, work safe, and have fun while your doing it

Eric

Well I guess my next question would be when you put up the sheetrock (drywall.. whatever its called) it does directly onto the studs and the only thing that would be underneath that is insulation/wires/pipes/ducts?

So your talking about plaster and woodsheathing... where does all that fit into the grand scheme of things?? We actually live in Las Vegas this house was build in 71 and is part of (as I call them) cookie cutter communities so I doubt there would be any major cover ups (btw man thats a bummer about your place you should sue the previous owner, I'm sure they are not going to beable to provide proof that a licensed and bonded contracter worked on that fiasco!!).

Oh and thanks for the warning about clean up I'm actually going to be in my apartment for two weeks while I'm in my house so I'm gonna fill up those dumpsters first

I am considering buying one of the guides form Lowes on how to do it any recommended books you might know of?

 
fuente's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 749

12-28-05, 10:23 PM   #9  
Posted By: C&S Rodriguez Well I guess my next question would be when you put up the sheetrock (drywall.. whatever its called) it does directly onto the studs and the only thing that would be underneath that is insulation/wires/pipes/ducts?

So your talking about plaster and woodsheathing... where does all that fit into the grand scheme of things?? We actually live in Las Vegas this house was build in 71 and is part of (as I call them) cookie cutter communities so I doubt there would be any major cover ups (btw man thats a bummer about your place you should sue the previous owner, I'm sure they are not going to beable to provide proof that a licensed and bonded contracter worked on that fiasco!!).

Oh and thanks for the warning about clean up I'm actually going to be in my apartment for two weeks while I'm in my house so I'm gonna fill up those dumpsters first

I am considering buying one of the guides form Lowes on how to do it any recommended books you might know of?

1) 'Sheetrock' is the brand of drywall that is most common.

2) If your house was built in '71 then it was built with drywall, not plaster.

3) Unless fraud was involved, you cannot sue the previous owner on work that may or may not have been done with a permit. Once the house closes, all the problems become your problems. Unless it's one of the contingencies, and if it was then the house would never close. It sucks; I'm finding things that are unsafe and not to code in my place as well that the previous owners left me as 'gifts'...!

Try your hand at one small room. I just got done remodeling 3 rooms and a kitchen. Took me the better part of 4 months to do the rock, electrical, floors, cabinets, etc. Out of everything, the rock was the most time intensive, labor intensive, attention to detail, and MESSY of all the projects.

Good luck.


Last edited by fuente; 12-29-05 at 09:25 AM.
 
Timinindy's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 278
IN

12-28-05, 10:24 PM   #10  
With what you are considering, it would be a perfect time to replace/ upgrade the wiring, if necessary. I'm not sure what was commonly used in `71, but you may want to inspect the wiring and figure out which type you have. If it is isn't plastic sheathed wire (2 wires, plus a ground), you should really consider this. I have recently been rewiring my house, where I have run all the cables (to replace old, dangerous BX (aluminum clad w/ no ground), and I have a retired electrician inspecting all my connections, approving the plan, and guiding me through the process. To do this, even if you do it in parts, you'll want to map the whole house's wiring system, determine if you need to add any circuits (older homes didn't account for the number of electronics we have today), and come up with a comprehensive new wiring plan. There are plenty of home wiring books and a whole section in here to help you. Bad wiring is the #1 cause of house fires.

 
Concretemasonry's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 6,125
MN

12-29-05, 06:40 AM   #11  
Taking out old drywall and putting up new?!

While you are looking at the wiring, also pay attention to the solid aluminum branch wiring. It was banned from use in about 1974 because it is a fire hazard. Some of it was plated to look like copper. Even the special fitures and pastes are not a good as getting rid of the junk.

I had 1 run of it in a home that was built in 1973 and unfortunately could not replaced it since it was buried. When I went to selling the house, somehow the home inspector found it and noted it as a safety hazard on the report. I had to give a $200 concession on the price to make the deal fly. It was legal when put in, but it was still correctly identified as a safety item.

Dick

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,804
TN

12-29-05, 07:23 AM   #12  
I would mention that in 1971 asbestos was still used with some popcorn - it would be a good idea to have it tested.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-29-05, 06:38 PM   #13  
C&S Rodriguez
Posted By: marksr I would mention that in 1971 asbestos was still used with some popcorn - it would be a good idea to have it tested.

I actually saw that on another post I appreciate you bringing it back up though, if I do have to deal with that what is the best way besides hiring a professional?

 
fuente's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 749

12-29-05, 06:44 PM   #14  
Posted By: C&S Rodriguez I actually saw that on another post I appreciate you bringing it back up though, if I do have to deal with that what is the best way besides hiring a professional?
There is no other safe way.

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-29-05, 07:28 PM   #15  
C&S Rodriguez
Posted By: fuente There is no other safe way.

Ohhhh the humanity my wallet is going to scream as I pay the contracter to do it!

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,804
TN

12-30-05, 07:00 AM   #16  
If it is legal to do yourself and you decide to remove the asbestos, wetting the material makes it less of a hazard. Be sure to seal off the area, wear a mask and clean everything well after removal. Check and find out how to dispose of it properly.

The main danger with asbestos is inhaling the dust!


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-30-05, 12:00 PM   #17  
C&S Rodriguez
Posted By: marksr If it is legal to do yourself and you decide to remove the asbestos, wetting the material makes it less of a hazard. Be sure to seal off the area, wear a mask and clean everything well after removal. Check and find out how to dispose of it properly.

The main danger with asbestos is inhaling the dust!
Excellent Idea!!!!! How hard is the mudd a lot of people are telling me to do as much as I can myself and have a contracter finish the mudding and put up the ceiling?! That does not sound like a bad Idea to me perosnally but would a contracter come out to do just that????

One other question is how long after I put up the drywall do I have to tape and mudd?

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,804
TN

12-30-05, 04:54 PM   #18  
You should check prices first, sometimes a pro will need to charge more for a little job because of all the extra trips. He will figure his driving time [and clean up time back at the shop] as well as the time he is there.

Drywall can be taped immediatetly after installation or you could possibly wait years. About 10 yrs ago I finished a garage [ceiling & 1 wall] in a house that was about 20 yrs old. I think it may have been taped but with no extra mud or paint most had to be removed and redone.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-30-05, 04:58 PM   #19  
C&S Rodriguez
Posted By: marksr You should check prices first, sometimes a pro will need to charge more for a little job because of all the extra trips. He will figure is driving time [and clean up time back at the shop] as well as the time he is there.

Drywall can be taped immediatetly after installation or you could possibly wait years. About 10 yrs ago I finished a garage [ceiling & 1 wall] in a house that was about 20 yrs old. I think it may have been taped but with no extra mud or paint most had to be removed and redone.

Well I wasn't looking to wait years really (or atleast not trying to) I was thinking about getting the drywall up in sections, in this case do the upstairs and as much of the stairway as posible and call them into finish and supply the mud so they just need to show up or attempt it myself I found the DIY guide and it looks easy

Ok as I learn more I have a few more questions:

Oh I keep hearing mention of a butt joint what is that?

What is the best way to take down drywall on the walls and ceilings???????

By the way thanks again everyone who has posted for taking the time I appreciate it!


Last edited by C&S Rodriguez; 12-30-05 at 07:11 PM.
 
MudSlinger's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 334
PA

12-31-05, 04:48 AM   #20  
C&S,

Removing the rock will be just as difficult as putting up new, as you must remove (or nail in) each nail or screw that was previously used, and scrape all of the old glue off before putting up new.

A plumber could look at the old plumbing when the walls are "open", but pipes corrode from the inside out. Hence there isn't much they could tell you other than there are pipes in your wall.

I wouldn't recommend starting to do the joint compound work, then having someone come in to finish the job. I know that when I have been asked to finish what someone else "started for me", it usually costs more than if I did the whole thing myself.

I would also recommend finding a Finisher that is willing to finish what you hang before you start. They will be able to tell you the best way to hang the rock so it can be finished. Also, in my area, very few finishers will finish rock thier crew didn't hang, because if the hanging job was bad, and the walls crack, the homeowner will ALWAYS blame the finisher, even if the homeowner didn't use glue and installed 2 screws per sheet. (Hey, "it can't be the way I hung it ... it's your joint compound that is cracking!!!!") Many just don't want the hassle.

A good electrician can run wires through walls with only minimal patching required. They should also be able to tell you how much more capacity you have by looking at the j-box and breakers. You shouldn't have to open the whole room to run a wire.

I would rent a drywall jack for the ceilings. The $30 per day is far cheaper than paying a laborer $160.

You may consider sheathing the ceilings in 3/8 rather than removing all of them. Little or no asbestos removal, and it will still look "clean" when you are done.

A butt joint is the "non beveled" end of the sheetrock (drywall). It is on the 4' width. The long length is beveled, and is referred to as the "factory" edge.

Replacing windows can be done by cutting back the drywall around the old window, using a saw to cut the nails holding the window to the framing.

Call me crazy, but I wouldn't replace all of the body panels of my car in order to fix a dent in the door; and in the same rite, I would NEVER tear out all the drywall in a house just to replace some doors and windows. However, I haven't seen your house, and don't know how much time you have to fix it. The experience can be either fun and rewarding, or it can drive you and your family and friends apart forever.

If you plan on having "all your friends" comeover to help with the demo, each room will look like a fraternity house when they leave, bottles and cups will be everywhere, your friends will be no more, and you will be searching the bible for the passage that asks God "Why me Lord?"; so I would strongly recommend that you "start small" in a bedroom (NOT THE BATHROOM!) and see if you enjoy it. Then I would evaluate the time, cost, etc., and see if you should do more.

My .02, I hope this helps...

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

12-31-05, 10:26 PM   #21  
C&S Rodriguez
Ok the wife and I did another run through the house, were still in the process of moving in, and found that the rooms upstairs and all the bathrooms are the only ones we are going to replace drywall in. The reason for this is that all the bathrooms have some water damage.. ick and the two rooms upstairs have this wonderful wood plating instead of drywall or where they have drywall the old roof leaked a little and made it puffy...

I do have a few more questions before I let this post die:

If a crew will not come out to do the finishing work will one instead come out to do texture work??

I understand to remove the popcorn ceiling I need to keep it damp to help avoid the abestos dust, when I vacuum it up will that spread it? I have a filter in my wet/dry that collects drywall dust will that work?

To knock down the old stuff all I need is to use a sledge/crowbar and make sure I don't hit any studs??

Rock on all,

C&S

Happy New Year!!!!

 
fuente's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 749

12-31-05, 10:54 PM   #22  
You could find someone to come do the texturing, but it will only be as good as the tape/mud job. And they'll tell you that. If it looks like crap before it's textured, it will look like textured crap when they are done, and they won't be responsible for that.

Personally I would never mess with stuff I knowingly knew contains asbestos, no matter what the law says. I'm sure others can weigh in on how to clean this up safely.

I wouldn't just bash away with a sledgehammer like they do on those DIY shows. You've got plumbing, wiring (possibly knob and tube), J-boxes, fire blocking...any number of things that could cause serious problems if you hit it with a hammer. Also, you could hit the studs or the other side of the wall, and damage something in that room also. If the walls are nailed in, I'd using a crowbar and try to get off as much of a sheet as possible. You'll have to pull the nails out of the studs, but it's safer then using a sledgehammer. If they are screwed in, you sould do the same thing but it will be a little messier. Be sure to wear a respirator/face mask during this whole process.

The rock is not like concrete; it doesn't take a hammer to break it, so why use it? Those DIY shows do it for effect I would think...

Good luck.

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,804
TN

01-01-06, 02:57 PM   #23  
There is always someone willing to do small jobs, the question is whether or not it is cost effective. Texture can hide some defects but it isn't a cure all.

Anytime asbestos is airborne it is a danger. Vacuming can cause it to become airborne. Before you get all excited about asbestos you should first have it tested. Although I have no personel knowledge on individual testing it is my understanding that you can purchase a kit [I think you send off a sample] to find out if it is indeed asbestos. Asbestos was not used in all popcorn and is no longer used in any texture. If local stores don't have it available you should be able to google the info you need.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
C&S Rodriguez's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

01-01-06, 10:33 PM   #24  
C&S Rodriguez
I have actually found that you can apply texture by roller so that is a posibility.

Marksr brought up an excellent point so I will avoid anything that will make the dust airborn again.. maybe just put down plastic and then use it as a makeshift bag, question is how to dispose of it?? county dump?

I can't imagine having someone coming out to do a small job is cost effective as you pointed out so I will avoid that if I can.

Hope everyone had a happy new year!!

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,804
TN

01-02-06, 06:34 AM   #25  
To dispose of asbestos you need to check with local officials. In some localities it is legal to dispose of at the count dump, but other places it is illegal and must be disposed of in a specified manner.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
guest2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 51

01-03-06, 10:16 AM   #26  
Here is a good site for removal of popcorn, including asestos, if you choose to do it. Also note that some drywall products and flooring can contain asbestos. It is worth testing anything you question and using good containment procedures even if there is no asbestos.

http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/i...opcornoff.shtm

 
Search this Thread