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Straightening bowed studs


rdhamm's Avatar
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01-02-06, 01:56 PM   #1  
Straightening bowed studs

I know I saw this somewhere, but I don't recall how to do this.

I have a stud on a wall where I am ready to install drywall. (2 x 4 construction interior wall)

One of the studs needs to be pulled in about 3/4" of an inch.

What I saw was someone slightly notching the stud and pulling it straight.

I have done this, but I cannot keep it straight. What do I use to keep it straight?

I have tried cross members with deck screws on both sides and I have tried a short vertical piece.

I can install a whole new vertical stud, aside the bowed one but this seems like defeating the purpose of the notch.

How do I keep the straightened stud straight?



Thanks.

 
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Snoonyb's Avatar
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01-02-06, 07:31 PM   #2  
Posted By: rdhamm I can install a whole new vertical stud, aside the bowed one but this seems like defeating the purpose of the notch.
Thanks.
You are correct.
By the time you get done playing with it, you could have replaced it.

 
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01-02-06, 10:14 PM   #3  
I had this issue recently. I'm not sure if it was the best solution, but I just took a belt sander and sanded down the studs that were sticking out until I got them all even. This was easier for me than trying to shim the studs that were "in"--it turned those were plumb and a few on the end were bowed out. I guess they may end up bowing out more.

 
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01-03-06, 04:01 PM   #4  
In my experience.... a stud that is bowed at installation will continue to bow as it dries/cures. If I have a stud that is "out of whack" - I remove it and use it for scrap lumber.... At $3.95 apiece... it's cheap insurance against a bowed wall in the future....

 
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01-04-06, 02:00 AM   #5  
Posted By: thezster In my experience.... a stud that is bowed at installation will continue to bow as it dries/cures. If I have a stud that is "out of whack" - I remove it and use it for scrap lumber.... At $3.95 apiece... it's cheap insurance against a bowed wall in the future....
In my case, the stud was at least 58 years old, and had a wall attached to it on the other side that wasn't being replaced. It was actually pretty interesting lumber--it had Douglas Fir stamped on it and it had sort of a red tint. Some of it was hard as a rock, and other parts drilled through pretty easily. Same thing with the floor joists.

 
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01-05-06, 03:03 PM   #6  
Well the way its done on some jobs is like this:

Set the skill saw at a 45 degree angle to full depth. Since the stud is in the wall cut a level cut in the face, doesn't matter what way the angle will end up. Now you would have cut 1/2 way through the stud. With the new 1/8th groove you have put into the stud you could either nail it together to push the stud away from you, or you could stick a shim in the 1/8th groove to bring the stud to you as much as you want. But what you should have done was just replace the stud and been done with it. If you have a stud that you can't replace, then this works.

 
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01-06-06, 02:35 PM   #7  
Posted By: Timinindy In my case, the stud was at least 58 years old, and had a wall attached to it on the other side that wasn't being replaced. It was actually pretty interesting lumber--it had Douglas Fir stamped on it and it had sort of a red tint. Some of it was hard as a rock, and other parts drilled through pretty easily. Same thing with the floor joists.
If there is another wall on the other side of that stud, trying to manipulate it will cause the stud to bend/bow in the other direction, messing up the good wall.

If this is the case, your only option is to sand or plane down the stud.

 
rdhamm's Avatar
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01-08-06, 07:29 AM   #8  
Thanks all

I have new construction for the most part so I can swap studs. Becomes a pain in the if it has HVAC or electrical on it.

Planing or sanding solves 1/2 of the bowed stud problem, the other half is also solved with Peladu's idea.

Thanks.

 
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