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utility room make over


bob57's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2005
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01-10-06, 08:01 PM   #1  
utility room make over

Hello folks
I'm on the Texas Gulf coast. The utility room is 10'x10' and has 3 doors (one is ext.) two windows and water heater, washer and dryer. The room is not climate controled, the walls are covered with 1/2' sheetrock. Some where in time the walls where covered with paneling and ceiling had just paneling. We had replaced the roofing early in 2004 after mold had started showing up. As I was removing the paneling the mold was on all four walls. I removed the (S-rock) and I would like some advise as to go with greenrock or regular. Something else My dryer vent hose was not connected properly and could that have added to the mold or that and the room not being climate control.

Thanks, Bob

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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01-10-06, 08:16 PM   #2  
Clothes dryers put a LOT of moisture into the air when they are not properly ducted. I'd be willing to bet that's a big part of the problem.

I'm not real familiar with the climate in the south, other than I know it's hot and humid. I'll find out here in a few weeks when I go to New Orleans on volunteer construction. If mold is a problem it's likely because of the high humidity (over 50% will encourage mold growth) and the fact that you room may be cooler at certain times of the day than it is outside (if the temperature of your walls is below the dew point, and you have the windows open, condensation will form on the walls like a soda can- maybe not THAT bad, but you get the idea).

I would think that standard sheetrock would be fine provided you get that dryer vent fixed. Once you tear down the old drywall, ensure that your walls are insulated and that vapor barrier is installed. If it is an unconditioned room, I believe your vapor barrier would go over the studs right behind the drywall. However in the south, I have heard they often recommend doing it the other way around due to the predominantly air conditioned living spaces and the hot humid temps outdoors.

Adding a window fan to the room would be a good idea because it would move air around which might very well stabilize the indoor/outdoor temperature and prevent mold growth.

Also, does the attic space over the utility room have roof ventilation? Perhaps adding some venting would help release a buildup of hot humid air above the room.

And what is below the room? If you have a dirt crawl space or basement, you could consider a vapor barrier on top of the dirt or underneath the floor as well. Ensure that water run off is not collecting around the perimeter of your room by sloping the soil away from the home, or diverting downspouts so that they drain farther from the home.

 
bob57's Avatar
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01-11-06, 08:21 PM   #3  
I do have a ridge vent, it was installed along with the roof and there was not any type of vent before the new roof.
This room along with additional room were added in the 60's other room was a beauty shop.
Main part of the house is on piers, and the add-on is on a slab and no condensation is visible.
When you commented about the roof vent and window fan I thought about a ceiling vent.
I also thought about putting that blue foam board (you see on the outside of homes) in between the studs and seal the gaps.
Now I am thinking about using oil-based paint on the sheetrock.
Oh yea it was suggested to me today after cleaning the wall behind the sheetrock use lacquer to seal the studs and back side of exterior skin of the house.

 
marksr's Avatar
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01-12-06, 06:18 AM   #4  
Posted By: bob57 Now I am thinking about using oil-based paint on the sheetrock.
Oh yea it was suggested to me today after cleaning the wall behind the sheetrock use lacquer to seal the studs and back side of exterior skin of the house.



Oil base paint dries harder and is more scrubable than latex. It isn't anymore mold resistant but is more moisture resistent. If you feel you have a need to seal the studs and backside of siding - an oil primer should work as well [more user friendly]

I would think once the dryer is properly vented and a little air circulation [if needed] you shouldn't have any need of additional steps. Of course it is always better to over kill than not do enough.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
XSleeper's Avatar
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01-12-06, 07:41 AM   #5  
Whatever you do, don't prime your new walls with oil based primer. My sister did that once (after I specifically told her not to) and I had to sand the walls for hours before I could topcoat. Something about oil based primer makes the hairs of the drywall stand straight out- it felt like 60 grit sandpaper when you ran your hand across it.

You could certainly use oil based paint for your topcoat if you wanted, but you could really achieve washability if you used a semi-gloss or even a high gloss enamel.

I took a long boring class on mold in Chicago one time, and one thing they said was that it is more difficult for mold to grow on slick surfaces, so the glossy paint is a good idea. They also said that Borax was the best detergent to use when cleaning mold- it has natural mold killing properties as well as surfactants to clean and help prevent future mold growth. They also said that the surfactants leave behind a slick film which also prevents mold growth- there is less of a surface for mold spores to stick to.

 
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