Taping and Mudding

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  #1  
Old 01-14-06, 11:51 AM
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Taping and Mudding

OK, I'm using "Sheetrock Lightweight All Purpose Joint Compound (the blue bucket)." I sealed my first joint with this and so far the taped stuck, nothing pealing back . I now just have to mud over the tape.

Here is the thing. I have a book that says to thin the mud some. The container says to use as is. I'm more inclined to follow the instructions on the bucket because it's all working for me now. My concern is the future and the tape coming off the walls .
 
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  #2  
Old 01-14-06, 12:11 PM
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Thinning the mud makes it easier to work with on your second and third coats.... it won't hurt the quality of the product nor the finish. Try it on one joint with a small amount mixed up in a kitchen cereal bowl... You'll be impressed with the easier application and your ability to feather it out with less work....
 
  #3  
Old 01-14-06, 12:20 PM
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I'll give it a try. Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 01-15-06, 05:54 AM
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Bolar, Great question I have been doing this for years and still wonder about that.

When I use joint compound (say the blue or green lids), I usually put about 2 "palmfuls" of water into the mud while it is in the mudpan (12"). This thins it enough to remove trapped air bubbles, and apply over joints.

The consitancy is (should be) like that of thick mayonaise, or thin cake icing. As you work with it (put it on/wipe off) the walls, the wall will absorb moisture and you will need to continue adding small amounts of water to maintain its consistency depending on what you are doing of course.

(Touching up "pock marks" and such uses little joint compuond, so you need to thin it occasionally, whereas coating joints uses a lot more mud and it will probably not need to be thinned afetr the first time ).

I hope this helps
 
  #5  
Old 01-15-06, 07:01 AM
Do It Over Don
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My nephew who hangs rock for a living told me that for a more solid joint to use green/heavier for the first coat and then use blue/light for 2nd/3rd coats. Green sets up harder and blue is easier to sand. Kind of made sense to me and has worked well in the one room I have done.
 
  #6  
Old 01-15-06, 07:22 AM
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I use green to stick the tape, and like the blue for coating as well (a lot is personal preference, although green to stick is stronger)

There is also more mud in a green bucket than in a blue lid (both buckets are 5 gal, but contents is different. Details, Details, Details... )
 
  #7  
Old 01-15-06, 09:27 AM
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Thanks for the advice. I'm going to thin it a little. I was a little freaked out because my tape is sticking. Everyone I've talked to had such problems making the tape stick, I was concerned I wasn't doing it right.

As if that makes sense .
 
  #8  
Old 01-16-06, 12:32 AM
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Bolar-- I don't know if it's too late, but it sounds like you are saying you put the mud in the joint and then put the tape on and stopped there. I just did my first project, and I was told to put a very thin coat and fill the joint under the tape, then put the tape on, and then immediately put a coat over the tape. Someone on here suggested slightly wetting the paper tape first. It seemed to work pretty good. The pros might chime in and clarify this...

Now, for what you'll be dealing with soon: I've done 3 coats, got it pretty darn smooth (just used a wet sponge after coats 1 & 2), but I'm not certain if it's good enough to paint. I used a light from the side to identify high spots and got those. Running my fingers across it, it seems real smooth, but I can slightly feel the transition from sheetrock to the mudded areas (very slightly). I think I'm ready to put the new construction primer, but I'm just not sure.
 
  #9  
Old 01-16-06, 05:11 AM
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close your eyes, lay your hand flat on the new sheetrock beside your mud joint, now lightly run your hand across the mud joint. You will feel a texture difference, but you shouldn't feel ridges or any noticable hump in the mud. It takes a bit of practice to know what to feel for, but you'll get good at it. I come from an autobody background and used the same technique on vehicles, works great!

edit: I would consider my self a novice drywaller DIY only, and I've only done a few houses, but I've yet to have a noticable mud joint after painting...
 
  #10  
Old 01-16-06, 06:11 AM
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I agree, letting your hands be your eyes helps. If after priming you find an area that needs more work, it is no big deal to remud that area, just remember to reprime any touch ups.
 
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