Basic Starter Drywall questions

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  #1  
Old 01-27-06, 07:13 AM
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Basic Starter Drywall questions

I'm currently finishing off parts of my basement. I have a small room I'm starting on first. I've completed my framing, wiring, lighting and duct work and am ready to start hanging drywall.

I have a couple of questions.

I heard that ceiling drywall is usually a different size than wall drywall. Is that correct? If so what is the typical thickness of drywall for a ceiling and for a wall?

Drywall usually has a beveled edge on the long sides of a sheet, correct?

Please tell me if I'm wrong in my assumptions here.
Typically you would place sheets with the long sides parallel to the floor thereby your beveled edges would butt up running horizontally.
Your vertical edge falls on one half of your wall stud and the other half of the stud is for the next horizontal piece. There is no beveled edge here so try to keep a tight edge to minimize the compound needed. Well actually try to keep all edges tight.
Try to alternate sizes as you go down the wall so you have 'T's instead of four-way intersections.

In another post I heard that having factory edges on an outside corner is not optimal. I assume an outside corner means one where the corner sticks or points out into the room. Correct?

What is the optimal edge for an inside corner? Does it matter if it's cut edges, beveled edges or a combination of both?

I'm going to be using my drywall screws for the job but I'd rather not mess with glue. What's the optimal distance between screws if I decide to skip gluing?

Thanks in advance for your help.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-27-06, 07:35 AM
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Welcome to the forums

5/8" drywall is best for ceilings but 1/2" usually works fine. The beveled edge is always on the long side. Your assumptions appear to be correct. If you hang the rock horizontally you will never have a beveled edge on either an inside or outside corner. I seldom use glue and place the screws 1 @ top and bottom and 2 aprox every 16"

Hope this helps, if I missed anything or you have more questions - just holler.
 
  #3  
Old 01-27-06, 07:53 AM
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Thanks Marksr,

Just curious but why thicker drywall on the ceiling? Sound proofing? Fire proofing?
 
  #4  
Old 01-27-06, 08:34 AM
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Although 5/8" rock is sometimes used for fireproofing that is not the reason it is preferred on ceilings. The thicker the rock is the stiffer it is = a straighter more level ceiling. Thinner rock is more apt to follow any irregularities in the framing and is more likely to sag when used on rafters with 24" centers.
 
  #5  
Old 01-27-06, 07:20 PM
Do It Over Don
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I was taught to hang the sheets vertically which eliminates almost all butt joints which are harder to hide with the mud.

If you are rocking around openings(doors or windows) it is better to use a whole sheet and cover the opening and then cut out around the opening. This will eliminate joints being directly above the door jams or window sills and will be stronger than a joint. It helps more around doors where the openning and shutting cause more vibration and over time can cause cracks in a joint.

If you end up with a cut edge on an outside corner, wouldn't it be harder to blend the mud once the corner bead is installed because the mesh of the bead is above the flat surface? With a beveled edge on an outside corner the mesh of the bead is below the surface of the bevel making it easier to hide. Just my take on things, but I am always up for learning a better way of doing things.
 
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Old 01-28-06, 04:06 AM
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Do it Over,

On the outside corners, the bead itself needs to be out from the wall. The flanges then sit against the flat and enough "gap" is creatded to cover the flanges with mud and the nail heads. (If you have metal studs, there won't be anything to nail into, and screws are very hard to cover unless they are installed very well, so you may consider adhesive and plastic bead)

If the bead is set "in" due to an outside factory edge, the corner will be more of a 90 than an "almost 90", although finishing it is more difficult with the bead of the corner bead set in.

**Also remember that when you trim the floor, you do not set your miter saw at "45". You will most likely need to set it at about 47 or 48 to make the corner match well. (It's good to hack up a test piece first)

In my area, all drywall must be glued to meet the building code, although if you buy the big tubes, and a good caulking gun (about $10), it only takes about 30 seconds/ sheet to put on. A big tube of the industrial kind of glue costs about the same as a little tube of Liquid nails or another name brand. (about $2/tube)

If you are installing the rock horizontally, cut the first sheet in half and put it on the bottom of the wall, followed by a whole sheet, then whole sheets after that. Then when you do the upper part, start with a whole sheet and your butt joints will be staggered by a half sheet. Only staggering by 1 stud isn't optimum, as the lower seam is going to be feathered 12" to the left and right, then the upper joint will do the same. If they are only 16" apart, the two 12" feathers are going to "collide" by 8". Although this can be finished, it is just more optimum to have them further apart.

I hope this helps
 
  #7  
Old 01-28-06, 11:36 AM
Do It Over Don
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MudSlinger,
I understand what you mean about the corner bead being mounted out from the corner but now you have me curious about the miter cuts. I have always cut at 45 and my joints leave something to be desired. If you cut at 47 or 48 do you then sand one of the cuts to get a near perfect fit?
 
  #8  
Old 01-28-06, 01:01 PM
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Don,

You wouldn't sand either cut. What Mudslinger is saying is that the mud build up creates an outside corner greater than 90degrees. Let's say its 92, this would mean you need two miters, each at 46 degrees to have a tight joint(46+46=92). A t-bevel and the # scale on your miter box will give you the corner's angle--divide that in half and make your cuts, then adjust as necessary. Starett also makes a miter finder square you could use for this.
 
  #9  
Old 01-28-06, 03:22 PM
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Thanks Kona!

Also, it is more important to have the outside edge of the trim match, so if the inside of the corner has a small gap (when looking down from the top) it can be caulked but nobody but you will ever know...(and us of course!)
 
  #10  
Old 01-28-06, 09:34 PM
Do It Over Don
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Gotcha. For any miter cut to look good or look its best, you should know the angle first and cut for that and not assume everything is square. When I did my foot molding in the kitchen, I assumed all corners were square and that is why my 45's have a little gap. I have a lot of trim work ahead of me in our dining room and I want it to look good. Thanks.
 
  #11  
Old 01-29-06, 01:03 PM
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On all of your inside corners, you may consider coping the trim instead of trying to match the angles.

Although coping a piece takes a little practice, you end up with a real nice looking job, and you only need to cope one side. The mating part is a straight cut that butts right into the corner of the room.

When I coped my first piece I thought "why would anyone EVER want to do this throughout an entire room" (yes, all 4 corners ), but after you mess up the first one, get the next to fit o.k., and do the third just about right, it's a lot easier for the fourth, and every job you ever do there after!

(I also don't recommend that you start with the crown molding as I did! ... start with the floor, and then tackle the crown with confidence.)

I hope this too helps.
 
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