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Plaster and joint-compound mix vs 3-coat gypsum plaster

Plaster and joint-compound mix vs 3-coat gypsum plaster

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  #1  
Old 02-11-06, 02:18 PM
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Plaster and joint-compound mix vs 3-coat gypsum plaster

It was suggested that I use a mixture of plaster of Paris and joint compound (spackle) to repair damaged plaster in my house (ceiling and wall). Someone else told me that one cannot mix the two.

If I used the plaster-spackle mixture, what would be the final finish? Would I get the same hard finish one gets by using gypsum plaster (3-coats: scratch, brown, and gauging plaster + lime)? What are the pros and cons of either approach?

Thanks much!
 
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  #2  
Old 02-12-06, 05:09 PM
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Joint compound and spackle are two entirely different things. Joint compound is gypsum based, spackle isn't.

In regard to mixing plaster and joint compound, there isn't any purpose to do it (although I have seen many do it, they are fooling themselves). Joint compound dehydrates, hence it will never get hard until the moisture is gone. Plaster has a chemical reaction and will get hard as soon as that takes place; although bits of plaster, curing "here and there" within a substance will not have any structural integrity as it is only little bits here and there.

Likewise, mixing plaster in with joint compound will make joint compound with little bits of plaster debri in it.

I personally don't ever do it. If you want the joint compound to cure quicker, crank up the heat and run a dehumidifier in the room. Plaster will cure while it is still wet, as long as the reaction can occur.

I'll leave the plaster part of this to those who know the process better than me.

I hope this helps, and if anyone has information on how mixing the two does help, please let me know.
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-06, 05:57 PM
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If all you have are some dings and dents then use a setting type of joint compound like EasySand or if you want something even harder then use Durabond both by USG. There are competing brands with EasySand, I'm not so sure about Durabond. Don't intermix plaster and joint compound simply use setting joint compound. Now if you have other larger or deeper areas to fix nose around some here and read the posts about how to plaster with plaster. I don't want to do a lot of typing of information that is already here. If you have a more specific question we can surely hwlp you out.
The advice you get here is worth what you pay for it.
 
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Old 02-12-06, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by tightcoat
The advice you get here is worth what you pay for it


Gee I thought our advice was worth more than that
 
  #5  
Old 02-12-06, 07:34 PM
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Mine is worth .02 (prevailing wage for semi-solicited advice)
 
  #6  
Old 02-12-06, 07:57 PM
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My wife has been saying for a long time that I work too cheap.
 
  #7  
Old 02-13-06, 05:49 PM
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Thanks!

Thanks very much! This was very helpful.
 
  #8  
Old 02-28-06, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by tightcoat
If all you have are some dings and dents then use a setting type of joint compound like EasySand or if you want something even harder then use Durabond both by USG.
Can I use either Durabond or EasySand to cover an entire wall that is full of cracks? Do I need a bonding agent first? If so, which one do you recommend? Can I just apply the bonding agent first and then apply one coat of Durabnd or EasySand on top?

Thanks.
 
  #9  
Old 02-28-06, 05:41 PM
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Both Durabond and EasySand bond well to most things. Maybe you don't even need the bonding agent. If the wall is badly cracked the cracks may well come through whatever you use. You can use a setting typoe of compound over mesh tape or you can use paper tape which is probabaly better and fix the cracks then skim the whole thing with Easy Sand or Durabond. It might be better to skim with some regular joint compound as it is easier to sand. It's hard to lay down Durabond or EasySand so it does not need sanded. If you lay it down very tightly and use multiple coats it might work better than a thicker coat. As soon as one coat sets you can give it another coat. The numbers on the label refer to the set time in minutes. 90=ninety min etc. Some company uses a label system that denotes the set time in hours. 150 = ninety minutes. I forget who does it that way.
The previous paragraph might be confusing. Regular joint compound can be sanded. The EasySand and Durabond are setting compounds. EasySand is not as hard as Durabond therefore easier to sand. It is the setting compounds that you can recoat as soon as the previous coat has set.
Regular stuff hardes by evaporation and must be dry to recoat.
 
  #10  
Old 03-01-06, 02:29 AM
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Ditto with Tightcoats response.

If there are cracks, you need to fix them first; after which you could skim the wall if the texture of the wall is bad. Although I wouldn't skim walls to fix multiple cracks as they will reappear regardless of what is used.

Easy-sand is harder to sand than regular "dehydrating mud", and durabond is some pretty tough stuff (harder to sand than easy-sand). Personally, I would stay away from the durabond unless you are familiar with using it, and I'm familiar with it but use it far less than easy-sand.

I hope this helps.
 
  #11  
Old 03-01-06, 12:19 PM
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You can also buy sheets of fabric for multiply cracked walls which you use like tape, but cover the whole wall or big sections of it. You then coat with plaster. I don't know the name, but a search on google for plaster crack repair should find it.
 
  #12  
Old 03-01-06, 01:24 PM
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The stuff guest2 is talking about I think is NuWall or maybe it's Nu-Wall. Check the permutations of that phrase on Google and you will find it. It is a fibreglass netting, not woven. A coat of paint like material is rolled on and then the matting embedded in the wet paint like stuff. A finish coat of the same or different, I forget, stuff is then rolled on top. I haven't used this but I saw it used once. I think it will work on tight cracks if they are not still moving. Any dings and dents need to be filled before the stuff is applied or they will show right through. The finished wall looked pretty good except for the lack or prep work. Had it been prepped it would have looked almost as good as new.
 
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