Drywall over Plaster --- Technique

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-15-06, 12:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 14
Drywall over Plaster --- Technique

Hey All, I'm about to drywall my hallway and stairway. Right now it is plaster covered by wood paneling. Before I begin I am looking for advice on how to proceed. As I don't need to do any major electrical work I am thinking I could just drywall over the existing plaster once I remove the paneling.

Is 1/4" sufficient in this case or should I go 1/2"? Should I use thicker grade sheet rock on the ceiling? Is there any other things I should look out for in this situation?

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-15-06, 04:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 334
1/4" should be fine. Remember to use a good amount of glue, as the studs in old plaster houses are often "random" (not on 16" centers).

Sometimes it is easier to hammer out a strip about 2 inches wide to find the stud locations. (As always, make sure you meet your building codes, and you may need to cut a filler piece for fire ratings.)

Also remember to remove the trim first, and it will need to have a little trimmed off before you reinstall it.

P.S. You may be able to just patch the plaster walls if they are in o.k. shape, in which case you wouldn't even need to do the 1/4" (sheathing in 1/4 would look like new walls though)

I hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 02-15-06, 05:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 14
Thanks Mud, can you explain this a little bit further:

"Sometimes it is easier to hammer out a strip about 2 inches wide to find the stud locations. (As always, make sure you meet your building codes, and you may need to cut a filler piece for fire ratings.)"

I can't visualize what you mean about the 2" strip. Same with the filler piece.

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 02-15-06, 07:16 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 334
Sure I can explain more!

Your studs run vertically from the floor to the ceiling; so if you open the wall by knocking out the plaster horizontally (about 2" wide) along the entire length of the wall, you will be able to see the exact location of the studs. Screws won't bite into lathe well, so you need to find the studs. Studfinders sometimes work, although sometimes they don't pick up small lathe nails. Or, the wall might be full of expanded metal lathe mesh, which, to a stud finder, is kind of like having the Tin Man going through the metal detector at an airport.

Older houses didn't have to be exactly on 16" centers because the person nailing in the lathe could see the studs, and the plasterers don't care where the studs are because they apply the plaster over the lathe.

When blue board and especially drywall came along in exact widths, it became imperative that framing was on "16's".

Once you cut out a "trench" of plaster, covering it with 1/4" may not meet the fire code for your area, so you may need to "put back" something in the trench (drywall or durabond, easy-sand, plaster, or the like, so if a fire does occur in that room, there is more than 1/4" of drywall before the flames can get to the studs.

I hope this answers your questions, but if it doesn't, just say so, and I will try to clarify it some more.

Don't worry, we'll get there
 
  #5  
Old 02-16-06, 06:20 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,804
Originally Posted by MudSlinger
kind of like having the Tin Man going through the metal detector at an airport. :


thanks for the laugh
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes