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Mold on the ceiling


seachel71's Avatar
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03-21-06, 01:17 PM   #1  
Mold on the ceiling

Hi All,

There is mold on the ceiling in our laundy room. We have cleaned it off with mold remover chemicals but it keeps coming back. Our home had been seriously remuddeled before we moved in . The laundry room is connected to a bath with no vent. One wall of the laundry room is curved as it is the backside of a spiral staircase. The ceiling were the wall is curved is not attached. The wall goes up and then...... nothing in the corner. We are now redoing the room above and when we pulled off the wallpaper there was more mold. Ok, any ideas on this mess???

 
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03-21-06, 01:37 PM   #2  
You have a moisture problem. Figure out where the moisture is coming from, remove it and you'll be free of mold. First thing I'd do is find a way to get the moisture out of the bathroom to which you say your laundry room is connected, as baths and showers are major sources of moisture.

 
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03-21-06, 01:53 PM   #3  
Mold and moisture

Suggestions on how to get rid of the moisture? No windows, interior room on bottom floor.

 
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03-21-06, 02:02 PM   #4  
You would need to find the direction the ceiling joists run and then find the closest distance to an outside wall going with the direction of the joists. Then install a ceiling exhaust fan. I realize this seems like an impossible task, but it is the only way you can resolve the problem. Good luck.

 
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03-21-06, 02:25 PM   #5  
Mold loves to grow behind wallpaper, so i'd suggest you strip all the wallpaper, wash the moldy walls with TSP or Borax detergent and let it dry. Put some fans in there to aid the drying.

You have mold growing in there for several reasons: High humidity, cold walls, lack of conditioned air/ moving air.

Things you can do to prevent mold from reoccurring:

Lower the humidity by installing an exhaust fan as mentioned, or by placing a dehumidifier in the room. Cold walls might be due to a lack of insulation in the walls or ceiling. Adding insulation in those areas may help. Keeping the room warm by leaving the doors open, placing fans in the room to circulate air will also help warm the walls and reduce humidity.

Cleaning the mold with chemicals, painting the walls, even using bleach will not prevent mold from growing again. The only way to prevent mold from growing is to clean it, then lower the humidity, prevent the walls from getting cold enough to condense, and by circulating the air to promote drying.

 
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03-21-06, 02:31 PM   #6  
Mold requires 2 things to grow - moisture and heat. Depending on the source there may be different things done to prevent the return of the mold but as the others have said you have to find and remove the source of moisture.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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03-21-06, 06:53 PM   #7  
I hate to go back on a mod., But Mold needs Three things! First a spore There everywhere so no chance of stopping them! 2nd a food source and 3rd moisture! Temp has no baring on mold! Yes most mold do like temps between 60 - 80 degrees but some like teens and some like low 100! The only thing we can control is the moisture!

 
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03-21-06, 07:39 PM   #8  
The 3 things that mold spores need in order to grow on a surface are: moisture, food, oxygen.

Temperature has an indirect bearing on mold growth. Mold can grow at almost any household temperature if the 3 above conditions are all present.

Mold grows when the relative humidity reaches 60% or higher. Warm air holds more humidity than cool air, so warm air is generally more prone to cause mold growth. Thus taking a hot shower fills the room with moisture a lot faster than if you were to take a cold shower. Secondly, cold surfaces can cause relatively "dry" air to condense on the cold surface. It may be 45% humidity in the room where the temperature is 70F, but if the dewpoint in the room is 50F, and the wall is 45F due to the cold temps outside and a lack of insulation in the wall, you're going to get condensation on the wall. (just like when you take a cold bottle out of the refrigerator and into a warmer climate... it sweats.) Due to that contrast in temperatures, the relative humidity on the wall can easily be 60% or higher.

It would not be correct to say that temperature has "no bearing" on mold growth.

 
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03-21-06, 08:28 PM   #9  
Mold on the ceiling

Mold spores need moisture and food. Even old spores will come to life with the right conditions. Not all molds need the same conditions. - Some even do better on treated lumber. All organisims and chemical reactions proceed faster at higher temperatures, unless the temperature is too high for the mold to live.

Ventilation, no food and ventilation are the keys to no mold. Wallpaper and wallpaper paste can be high in cellulose, which is usually food for mold.

After 3 weeks in Gulfport, MS, I just had the ceiling in my concrete hotel room sprayed. A neighbor (next room) had his sprayed weekly because he keeps his room much warmer - Not scientific, but an observation. We are on the third floor, which was flooded. If we were in a wood/drywall building (if it lasted) we would have been a hundred miles away because there would be no rooms. Next year it may be worse.

Dick

 
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