Help w/ Knockdown

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-26-06, 02:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2
Help w/ Knockdown

Hello,

I have a home that has what looks to be a knockdown texture on the walls (build mid 70's). I am doing some major renovations and need to reproduce the texture. It doesn't appear to have been sprayed on and then knocked down. It definitely has an overall 'grain' to it and the 'blobs' are all about quarter to silver dollar sized. Any advice on how to reproduce would be much appreciated. I would be happy to send someone a PM with a photo if you can help.

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-26-06, 02:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268
Originally Posted by cdhoke
Hello,

I have a home that has what looks to be a knockdown texture on the walls (build mid 70's). I am doing some major renovations and need to reproduce the texture. It doesn't appear to have been sprayed on and then knocked down. It definitely has an overall 'grain' to it and the 'blobs' are all about quarter to silver dollar sized. Any advice on how to reproduce would be much appreciated. I would be happy to send someone a PM with a photo if you can help.

Thanks.
You're going to have fun. Reproducing existing texture is difficult, but not impossible. Practice on scrap drywall - using a number of different "tools" to create your texture. I've used old paint brushes, sea sponges, kitchen cleaning tools, rags, etc..... to make a "close match". It's going to be "trial and error" until you find what you want....
 
  #3  
Old 03-26-06, 05:01 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 334
cdhoke,

I don't know much about posting pictures on websites, but is it possible to put a link/post it here? I know that the Moderators prefer them being posted on the forum so all can benefit from the informational exchange.

Best regards,

MudSlinger
 
  #4  
Old 03-26-06, 07:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2
  #5  
Old 03-27-06, 05:44 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,834
It was a little hard for me to tell from the photos but I believe it was sprayed on and then knocked down. Knock down texture can have a variety of finishes depending on the mixture of the texture, how heavy it was sprayed and how soon it was knocked down.

Thezster explained different ways to texture small repairs but if you are doing a whole wall/room you would be better off using a compressor and a hopper to spray the texture on. If you thin down joint compound to the neighbor hood of paint consistency you can then spray it on the walls and take a wide drywall knife to knock down the splatters. It may take some trial and error to get it close to the original texture. You can also hire someone to texture the walls for you.
 
  #6  
Old 03-27-06, 09:04 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268
Mark is right on..... For large areas - I use a hopper system.... I thin the mud to a consistency of pancake batter.... when you drag your finger through it, it closes up behind your finger trail, but you can still tell where you dragged it..... You will need to experiment with orifice sizes and air pressures to find the size "blobs" you want. Also.... if you drag your knife to soon.... you'll have a flat surface...... to late and you'll end up with a knobby surface.... I wait until the tips are turning slightly to a "dry color"... before lightly (LIGHTLY) dragging my knife at a sharp angle over the bumps..... Again... practice makes perfect. Good luck! The nice thing about texture is.... if you don't get it right the first time... you can always drag the knife with heavier pressure, remove the wet texture, and start again.....
 
  #7  
Old 03-27-06, 07:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,722
The texture in the two photos look different to me. the one on the left, the blue ond #......60 looks more like it was dabbed on then knocked down. The one on the right was sprayed. It looks just like my house. I have done some patches like this: Patch the holes and tape and mud them. Let them dry etc. etc. I use a plasterer's dash brush and mix some thin mud like the others have described then dip the brush in the mud and use my hand to bend the bristles back and let them flick the mud onto the wall. You get several flicks per brush full. You could use a whisk broom and do just as well. From there on out it is timing to knock it down. That is described by the others. I've done patches as large as a yard square this way. It's slow but it's faster than dragging out the gun and compressor and then having to wash the hopper out for such a small area. I think if it was any larger than that I would use the sprayer. All of the things that are variables with the sprayer are active with the brush, mud consistency, distance from the brush to the wall, the intensity of the flick and the timing of the knockdown. Experiment on some scraps. You do have more than one chance if you don't use Durabond.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes