tips on skim coating ,please!

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  #1  
Old 04-11-06, 03:27 PM
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Question tips on skim coating ,please!

Hello,

i am trying to do Venetian Plaster in some areas of my house.
Unfortunately,most of my walls are textured(popcorn texture?)
It was suggested to me to do a skim coat to make it a very smooth surface.
I know nothing about skim coating or what kind of supplies i need to get to be able to do it.
Please help,

thank you,
Lana B.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-11-06, 05:44 PM
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Walls are normally textured in a texture called orange peel and it is just the ceilings that are done in popcorn. I seriously doubt your walls are popcorn as the stuff would be obnoxious to rub against and would fall off when bumped and leave gouge marks and would also trap dust, especially above heat registers.

Regardless. Whatever is sticking out...I would lightly sand so you get a flat surface with no one hump higher than any other hump. Then, *tightly* skin coat, where you apply readymix mud under force. If you tryed to say skimcoat a smooth wall, you would not have that luxury of floating over the uniform humps, and requires greater skill to keep from leaving all kinds of ridges, which then would have to be sanded afterwards. But when you do fill-type skim-coating, this is easy as literally the ridges are acting as your guide.

I am not versed in veneer plaster work, but have seen it demonstrated on tv, and this requires skill not only in application, but you also have to wait for just the right time during the setting process to go over it again to get it to come out smooth.

If you are literally trying to fill between the humps in your texture, I would just go the route of the ready mix mud, I think. It may take a couple coats, but as long as you don't try to cut corners and time by putting it on too thick, but rather bear down with the trowel, just to fill, I think time wise and mess wise, this would be the good approach for the novice.
 
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Old 04-11-06, 07:04 PM
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Thank you so much for your reply,DaVeBoy!

What is the "readymix mud "?Is it something i can buy in one of the home improvement stores?
Thanks again,

Lana B.
 
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Old 04-11-06, 07:21 PM
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Joint compound [ready mix] comes in 5 gal buckets [sometimes 1 gal] It isn't really ready for use. It should be remixed with a drill and paddle but you can use a taping knife and mix small quanities in the mud pan. For skim coat purposes you want to thin the joint compound slightly which will help it to go on smoother. If you have trouble tackling a whole wall at one time you can skim coat managable squares in a checker board pattern and go back and fill in the blanks when dry [which will probably be before you finish]

Almost forgot, it can be purchased at all big box stores and most hardware stores.
 
  #5  
Old 04-12-06, 02:27 AM
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Originally Posted by lanaana
Hello,

i am trying to do Venetian Plaster in some areas of my house.
Unfortunately,most of my walls are textured(popcorn texture?)
It was suggested to me to do a skim coat to make it a very smooth surface.
I know nothing about skim coating or what kind of supplies i need to get to be able to do it.
Please help,

thank you,
Lana B.

Sounds to me like you have either a "orange peel" texture.


Skimming a wall / walls is pretty easy, even for a unexperienced person.

But, if you are going to do some plaster texture over the skim coat, DONT use ready mixed mud. You need either some Pro Form or USG "hot mud" 45 minute mud will work fine. The reason I say this is, regular mud when applied in very thin layers (skim coat)..........will turn wet again and smear when you go to plaster it, especially if its skimmed over glossy paint. Hot mud will give you a harder layer and will not smear as easy.

I prefer ProForm hot mud, as its is very easy to mix and not as powdery as USG. USG tends to be lumpy at times as well.

You dont need to sand before applying the skim coat. You can take a 6" or 8" drywall knife and scrape the walls. After the wall is scraped, you can apply the skim coat. You dont need a heavy layer of mud, just put the mud on the wall and pull it down tight..............it will look almost transparent when its setting..... when it dries..........you can give it a light scraping with a knife not knock off any ridges. It doesnt need to be perfect.............the plaster will cover minor imperfections pretty easily.

Remember to take a wet sponge over the skimmed wall before applying plaster.............OR THE PLASTER WILL SETUP too fast.

I hope this helps................GOOD LUCK.
 
  #6  
Old 04-12-06, 02:29 AM
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Originally Posted by lanaana
Hello,

i am trying to do Venetian Plaster in some areas of my house.
Unfortunately,most of my walls are textured(popcorn texture?)
It was suggested to me to do a skim coat to make it a very smooth surface.
I know nothing about skim coating or what kind of supplies i need to get to be able to do it.
Please help,

thank you,
Lana B.

Sounds to me like you have a "orange peel" texture.


Skimming a wall / walls is pretty easy, even for a unexperienced person.

But, if you are going to do some plaster texture over the skim coat, DONT use ready mixed mud. You need either some Pro Form or USG "hot mud", and 45 minute mud will work fine. The reason I say this ?..... regular mud when applied in very thin layers (skim coat)..........will turn wet again and smear when you go to wet the wal before applying plaster, especially if its skimmed over glossy paint. Hot mud will give you a harder layer and will not smear.

I prefer ProForm hot mud, as its is very easy to mix and not as powdery as USG. USG tends to be lumpy at times as well.

You dont need to sand before applying the skim coat. You can take a 6" or 8" drywall knife and scrape the walls. After the wall is scraped, you can apply the skim coat. You dont need a heavy layer of mud, just put the mud on the wall and pull it down tight..............it will look almost transparent when its setting..... when it dries..........you can give it a light scraping with a knife not knock off any ridges. It doesnt need to be perfect.............the plaster will cover minor imperfections pretty easily.

Remember to take a wet sponge over the skimmed wall before applying plaster.............OR THE PLASTER WILL SETUP too fast.

I hope this helps................GOOD LUCK.
 
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Old 04-12-06, 11:14 AM
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thank you!

Thanks again for all the replies!
 
  #8  
Old 04-12-06, 08:14 PM
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P.S. "hot mud" is a slang term for the plaster based, setting type, joint compound. (Easy-sand, durabond, and the like.)
 
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