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Stucco-like ceiling removal


PatriotsNation4's Avatar
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04-16-06, 05:53 PM   #1  
Stucco-like ceiling removal

I just bought a home with what I believe is some type of stucco on all the ceilings. It's NOT a "popcorn" accoustical ceiling. It is a jagged and pointy type of textered white substance (STUCCO? ) that is sharp enough to cut your finger, poorly done---I might add. Does anyone know how to remove this hard, jagged white (stucco?)? Please help!

 
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04-16-06, 07:23 PM   #2  
It sounds like a regular tetured ceiling. If it is, there is vitually no way to remove it short of taking the drywall or plaster out.

You can eliminate it by skim coating the ceiling with joint compound. It will most likely take 2 or 3 coats, but you will never know it was there when you are done.

If you are going to do this, you may consider sanding it with 80 or 100 grit sandpaper using a sanding pole to first to knock off the sharpest points. (don't kill yourself doing it, just run the sandpaper over it a few times).

That would probably be the easiest way to go. (It is also an "accepted" method in the industry)

I hope this helps.

 
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04-17-06, 03:35 AM   #3  
Thanks, I'll try. The jagged points are so long it lends me to believe it wasn't done properly. It's like....not just textered, but "goopy" the way the substance was pulled away fromthe wall and allowed to dry....almost like whipped cream. And I was already told by someone at work, "Sounds like you'll have to remove the drywall." How about putting drywall OVER the existing ceiling?

 
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04-17-06, 10:48 AM   #4  
Shouldn't be a problem to drywall over the ceiling but you would still need to level the texture up some so the new rock can lay level/flat. Also when adding drywall you may need to extend electrical boxes and remove and reinstall any crown moulding.

Personally I don't think hanging new rock would result in any time saved. I would scrape off what I could of the old texture and then skim coat.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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04-17-06, 12:08 PM   #5  
Thanks. One last thing.....the jagged points on this textered ceiling are LLOOOONNNNNG. Really lousy look. If it was like the one currently in my living room where I live now, I'd leave it be. But this one is goopy looking like whipped cream. I'm thinking that sanding it is an exercise in futility if my intent is to smoothen it enough to merely fill it in with a couple of more coats of stucco. Have you ever seen such a look? Just out of curiousity, is that the desired effect or perhaps the person who did it merely over-used the compound and pulled away the trowel too far in creating those long points. Your thoughts?

 
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04-17-06, 02:07 PM   #6  
Stucco-like ceiling removal

Anything as long and thin as you describe, should be able to be knocked off easily (even before sanding), so then you can proceed with sanding.

Give it a try before worrying too much. You have already decided you want to cover it, so the question is how. Once you try, then you will have a feel for a skim coat or new sheet rock.

Dick

 
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04-18-06, 04:04 AM   #7  
If they are really that long, you may be able to use a floor scraper first (a scraper with a blade about 12 inches wide and a "broom handle" sized steel handle), then sand it down, then skim with joint compound

 
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04-18-06, 09:09 PM   #8  
just a thought

I wonder how many coats of paint are on it - if any?
You can sometimes remove popcorn texture by spraying it with water with a spray bottle, letting it soak in for a bit, and then scrape it right off.. depends on what they used for texture originally... might work ..

also, some rental stores now handle power drywall sanders. it is basically a random orbital sander on the end of a pole that attaches to a vaccuum. They use hook & loop pads - I think porter-cable makes one. You could try finding one and get some 80 grit to knock it down quick.

 
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06-05-06, 12:51 AM   #9  
I could have started this thread!

My den ceiling looks like it was done by a cake decorator! I had some stalactites hanging down. I don't have the money time or patience to redo the whole thing but I took a rasp and "planed" some of the "texture" down. I still have half the room to go, I did it a few years ago when the stalactites were collecting dust. Now that I am doing some major decorating I am going to do the rest. I may redo the part that I did to see how flat I can get it.

The rasp was one of those ones where you can get replacement blades, kind of like a cheese grater.

The previous owners had unusal taste. The cake icing ceiling room also has grasscloth wall paper. The previous man of the house was a paper hanger and the lady was an artist. I guess they were creating a study in "texture" when they designed the den.

I am doing my kitchen now and have only a reasonable amount of texture in in with only a few overdone areas. They put wallpaper border on the ceiling and I am trying to get that off. The circumfrance of my ceiling is going to be smooth which will clash with the otherwise tasteful texture of the ceiling. I am trying to blend the edges. I have other issues to deal with besides redoing my ceilings. They are very dingy and yellow so I will just be glad to have them white for now. I am involved in an extensive wallpaper removal project, luckily the walls were properly primed first. It would have been a simple job if it weren't for that ceiling border. I wish I new how my project was going to look when I am finished. I am patching and skim coating rough areas on my walls and I wonder if I am overdoing it. I've been doing prep work for over a week now and would like to move on to the priming phase. I guess I can prime and if it's still not smooth enough for me do more skimcoating or somethign.

Sorry for the thread hijack, it's just that I could really relate to the origional posters problem. We must have had the same decorator at our homes at one point and I'm thinking that person does cakes on the side.

 
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