hanging drywall over exsisting walls

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  #1  
Old 08-31-06, 08:03 PM
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hanging drywall over exsisting walls

We are replacing sliding doors with windows (7 of them). We have hot water baseboard heat and suspended ceilings. After we take out the sliders we have to fill in under the window and we are going to replace the damaged drywall in the rest of the room,all of which extends above the suspended ceiling. Can we hang new dry wall over the exsisting walls and trim around the baseboard heat so that we don't have to remove the strips that hold the ceiling up and take the registers apart? It doesn't matter to us that the strips would be partially covered around the perimeter of the room. If we can do this, is it best to use thinner dry wall or thicker? Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-01-06, 05:42 AM
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Yes you can overlay with new drywall. Be sure you use long enough screws to secure the new rock to the studs. 1/4" 3/8" and 1/2" - all will work fine.

When you overlay drywall you open up a new set of problems. All electrical boxes will need to have box extensions. Window/door trim will nedd to be removed and a spacer [same thickness as drywall] installed so the trim will go back up right. If you leave the trim and just drywall to it, then that edge will need to be addressed.

Is there a reason you want to install new drywall instead of repairing the old? Most times walls can be repaired so that the repairs don't show.
 
  #3  
Old 09-01-06, 09:58 AM
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Smile secrets under wallpaper

I forgot completey about the electrical outlets, doorways, etc that would have to be extended. I don't know which would be a bigger pain, dealing with the suspended ceiling or the outlets. Maybe the outlets would be easier.

The exsisting drywall would need quite a bit of repair. When I took the wallpaper down so that I could paint, I found the previous owners had patched their window changes with pieces of paneling and all sorts of things. It was such a mess that I wound up covering it back up with more wall paper, which is probably why they wall papered it to begin with. We figured as long as we had to plug the holes that 3 sliders would make, we may as well put in all new drywall so that we can paint instead of wall paper. Maybe the best thing to do would be take the wallpaper down, determine how difficult it would be to cut and fit and repair and go from there. Sound like a plan?
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Old 09-01-06, 11:16 AM
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Another option is to rip out the existing drywall entirely and start from scratch. Not as difficult a job as it would seem. Installing drywall is pretty user friendly and it goes fast, the difficult part comes with mudding and taping. You'll have to do that anyway if you sheetrock over the existing.
 
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Old 09-01-06, 01:39 PM
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Since you don't want to contend with the drop ceiling and baseboard heat, I would think cutting out the bad areas to replace sections of drywall would be simpliest. Once the repairs are finsihed, skim coating the wall should make everything uniform.
 
  #6  
Old 09-01-06, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Wayne Mitchell
Another option is to rip out the existing drywall entirely and start from scratch. Not as difficult a job as it would seem. Installing drywall is pretty user friendly and it goes fast, the difficult part comes with mudding and taping. You'll have to do that anyway if you sheetrock over the existing.

I agree. There isn't too much work in removing dryway as opposed to the huge mess in removing old plaster and lathe say. In the long run I think it would save you more work with extentions etc. Depending on how bad the overall walls are you might want to just patch like marksr said however I don't recommend skim coating an entire wall as it is not easy to do for DIY'ers (or me either for that matter) I would rather hang new then do that any day.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 09-01-06 at 02:27 PM. Reason: Created spaces between quote and post
  #7  
Old 09-02-06, 05:07 AM
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Originally Posted by BuiLDPro68
I don't recommend skim coating an entire wall as it is not easy to do for DIY'ers

Skim coating doesn't have to be difficult to do. If you break the wall up into a checkboard pattern and skim squares that are managable, once done with the 'black' squares, go back and fill in the blanks - the surrounding mud will already be dry.

Sometimes the best way to do a 'big' job is to cut it up into many 'little' jobs.
 
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