edge protection?

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  #1  
Old 10-26-06, 11:41 AM
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edge protection?

I will be finishing a garage and want to find out if there is something out there to protect the edges from damage.

An example is that I have to drywall around a built-in sink, and the edges around the sink will be exposed; i.e. the exposed rock will be butted up against the sink frame. I’ve seen what looks like edge protectors at HD, but it doesn’t look to be any way to fasten them.

Hopefully this makes sense, and maybe I saw the product that will work…? I could always use the 3M contact cement to adhere it.

Thanks.
 
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Old 10-26-06, 12:34 PM
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They are called Drywall Corner Beads. they are usually held on with screws/nails/adhesive.
 
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Old 10-26-06, 01:26 PM
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This is not for a corner, it’s for the edge of a piece of drywall; something to cover the exposed area so water does not wick up into it, or if it gets bumped it doesn’t blow out.

Maybe my explanation was not the best….
 
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Old 10-26-06, 02:41 PM
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I think j-bead is what I am looking for. Seems to fit the description. Still don't know how to attach it, other than glue.
 
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Old 10-26-06, 02:48 PM
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They make 2 styles of corner bead for situations where drywall will end. One is an L-trim, the other is a J-trim.
 
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Old 10-26-06, 03:16 PM
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thanks. And what is the best way to fasten it?
 
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Old 10-26-06, 03:22 PM
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The "best" way is to ensure that there is wood backing back there before the drywall goes up, and then screw the trim on. 2nd best would be to use contact adhesive (aerosol can), spraying both surfaces, letting the glue tack up, then pressing the pieces firmly into place.
 
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Old 10-26-06, 03:26 PM
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ok. so sort of guide the drywall into the bead. Thanks !
 
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Old 10-26-06, 03:35 PM
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L-trim usually gets tacked onto the backing and up against the wall or sink or whatever. Then the drywall gets taped and mudded against the L.

If you are using J, you can either tack the J to the backing making sure it is tight against the sink, or slip the J onto the drywall, put the drywall up, and then you can still move the J up against the sink tight before you put your screws through it.
 
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