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Textured ceilings vs drywalled/painted ceilings


DIY Virgin's Avatar
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11-02-06, 10:53 PM   #1  
Textured ceilings vs drywalled/painted ceilings

We are adding a 28x22 foot master bedroom to our home with 12 foot cathedral ceilings. My husband wants the ceiling textured - not popcorn - and I'm not sure what I want. Can anyone advise me as to the pros and cons of a textured vs. not-textured ceiling? And what, if any, other options do I have? Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!

 
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11-02-06, 11:31 PM   #2  
With textured ceilings the sanding to a smooth finish is eliminated. So, it's easier and likely less expensive. Texture can hide imperfections and rough seams in the ceiling. Textured ceilings tend to be more popular in some areas than others. The stucco and popcorn look are not as popular as they once were. In traditional and contemporary style interiors, ceilings are generally smooth. It's a matter of personal taste. Some posters post wanting to know how to eliminate textured ceilings and walls, match texture when making repairs, and clean textured ceilings.

Textured ceilings require more paint when painting. Too, they can be a pain when it comes to cleaning. Cobwebs usually require a brush to disconnect them from the texture because they want to adhere. Cobwebs on smooth textured can be knocked down with a towel or duster. Too, if there is ever the need to do a repair, matching texture can be a challenge.

 
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11-03-06, 04:34 AM   #3  
The larger the ceiling, the harder [more work,expense] it is to get a good slick finish. My personal favorite is the knock down texture. It doesn't hide as well as popcorn and needs to be painted [all texture should be painted to protect it from moisture/humidity] but IMO makes for a classy look. All textures can be applied from very light to heavy, all depending on the look you want.


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11-03-06, 07:06 AM   #4  
There are a lot of options when it comes to texturing. See if there's one on which the both of you agree. Otherwise, a significant nap on a roller will leave stipple behind that is a bit of a texture. I like the stipple a 3/4" nap roller leaves on walls, a 1" on ceilings would probably look pretty good - you can try things like this out on a piece of cardboard to get what you like, then do the painting once you've decided.

 
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11-03-06, 07:20 AM   #5  
While nice textures can be attained with a roller, it can be difficult to achieve a uniform texture on a large ceiling with a roller.

IMO a large ceiling is best textured with a hopper gun. Popcorn, knock down, splatter and orange peel are the textures most commonly sprayed. Stomp textures are rolled on and then a design stomped into the wet mud.


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11-03-06, 08:50 AM   #6  
Mark and I have given you differing advice on the roller texture issue. His experience in this area dwarfs mine. You would be best served by following his advice over mine.

 
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