54" sheetrock

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  #1  
Old 11-15-06, 04:39 PM
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Talking 54" sheetrock

I am doing a garage conversion and once I have my joists in there, the final floor to ceiling height will come to 106". I have read that 54" sheets can be had and I figured that would make a lot less work for me. I didn't see this oversize at the local big box store, are they difficult to find? I figure I'd call a drywall outfit in the morning and ask them.

Also, this is a 17' x 20' room, I have some experience in drywalling but have never tried to handle 10 footers. I will be doing it myself, think it'd be a problem?

Oh, and one more thing since I have you on the line! Do y'all prefer paper or fiberglass tape?

Thanks once again for this invaluable website!

Howard
 
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  #2  
Old 11-15-06, 05:21 PM
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If you're renting a drywall lift for the ceiling, you can handle them alone. If not - get help. The walls shouldn't be a huge issue assuming you can lift them in place without getting a hernia.

Tape?? Paper.....Paper..... Paper......
 
  #3  
Old 11-15-06, 05:35 PM
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Worth repeating - paper tape.
 
  #4  
Old 11-15-06, 05:41 PM
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We all agree on the paper tape

Drywall supply house is the only ones who have 54" rock, at least in my neck of the woods.
 
  #5  
Old 11-15-06, 06:09 PM
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Thanks everyone, I figured the 54" was a specialty. I'll find a drywall shop somewhere, it'd certainly be worth it to me. I'll call a drywall professional tomorrow to track down a store.

The garage was previously finished but I tore the drywall down on the walls for the floor joists, new windows, electrical, insulation, etc. Thankfully I was able to keep the ceiling in place, although I need to scrape off the popcorn (yes, I am aware of possible asbestos).

I'm not very far along yet, should finish up the rim joists this weekend. Paper tape it is!!! Keep y'all posted on my progress. More than likely, it'll be in the form of a question! Thanks again!

Howard
 
  #6  
Old 11-15-06, 06:22 PM
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Asbestos was outlawed in the late 70's so if your home was built in the 80's or later there shouldn't be any worry. I think there are kits you can buy to test for asbestos. The dust is the biggest concern.
 
  #7  
Old 11-15-06, 07:52 PM
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I also vote for paper tape. I did a room with mesh tape years ago and within 6 months all the joints had cracked. I do wonder why somebody doesn't put out a paper tape with a light adhesive to eliminate a bed coat.
 
  #8  
Old 11-16-06, 04:13 AM
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I think the bed coat is one of the reasons that paper tape is superior. My living rm ceiling was taped with old mesh tape that had lost it's sticky so it was set in a bed coat. 10 yrs later and no cracks...... well except for one where the roof leaked
 
  #9  
Old 11-16-06, 06:30 AM
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Not to hijack this thread, but I am curious about the differences between mesh tape and paper, and the apparent preference for paper.

Paper gets set in a bed coat, then covered in successive layers until it matches the surrounding level.

Mesh tape goes on dry, but the first coat penetrates it resulting in essentially the same thing as a bed coat, which is then covered in successive layers just like the paper.

Both end up encapsulated in joint compound and neither seem to have much resistance to flexing on their own (leaving cracks).

It leaves me wondering if the difference is that the joint compound bonds better to the paper than it does to the fiberglass in the mesh tape. If that is the case, then maybe the best of both could be combined by making the mesh tape out of something that the joint compound adheres to like the paper. It might be that the sticky "glue" on the mesh tape actually inhibits the bonding with the joint compound (that would explain Marksr's experience with the "old mesh tape that had lost it's sticky").

Comments - opinions?
 
  #10  
Old 11-16-06, 09:54 AM
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It is my understanding that sticky tape works best if an additional adhesive is first sprayed on the joint to be taped. Apparently the sticky tape tends to loose it's bond after time.
 
  #11  
Old 11-17-06, 04:30 AM
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Paper tape makes such a nice sharp corner, too. Nearly impossible with mesh.
 
  #12  
Old 11-17-06, 06:03 AM
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The mesh tape was never intended for corners although I once repaired a rental that had a 3' crack in the corner with the sticky tape. It wasn't any fun but not having any paper tape and using hot mud, it allowed me to not have to leave the job.
 
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Old 11-27-06, 04:10 AM
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I almost always use the powdered 20 minute stuff when making repairs. Gets you in and out with 2 coats in a few hours.
 
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